Transition from pitched to flat roof at dormer

Does anyone have a link to an illustration of a better flashing technique for this transition than just adhering the edge of the sheet material to the dormer fascia? (Sorry no closer pics, but the roof of this three story building was beyond the reach of my 32’ ladder).

Well Michael, step flashing could have been made out of just about anything and slid behind the eve metal.That looks sick, my dog does better work than that.

Your dog could do better work than much of what I see, but it’s not much help if I report that to my client. What I need is an illustration from a industry or trade source showing a better way to do it.

I will have to look for a pic with a better angle, but this is what the top should look like.

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have to put som l metal under shingles and under edge metal.

gweedo

Sorry I couldn’t have been more help to you, I just don’t have pictures of what I was talking about. Dennis has a good pic of copper with soldered joints which should last a lifetime, however a simple fix that any real roofer could do with a common brain function is to use step flashing. The step flashing can be set in roofing cement as long as none of it is exposed and will be there longer than the roof. I have to do these all the time and the contractors never allow for any extra , I simply have to make chicken caserole out of chicken schit. Its not rocket science to roof something like this ,any roofer could fix it where it won’t leak without covering it with bull.

Why don’t you get a roofer to fix the mess?

[quote=“bushhog109”]

Sorry I couldn’t have been more help to you, I just don’t have pictures of what I was talking about. Dennis has a good pic of copper with soldered joints which should last a lifetime, however a simple fix that any real roofer could do with a common brain function is to use step flashing. The step flashing can be set in roofing cement as long as none of it is exposed and will be there longer than the roof. I have to do these all the time and the contractors never allow for any extra , I simply have to make chicken caserole out of chicken schit. Its not rocket science to roof something like this ,any roofer could fix it where it won’t leak without covering it with bull.

Why don’t you get a roofer to fix the mess?[/quote]

Amen, Brother.

Michael,
I hope this helps. Not a close up, but you can see an example(torch down on low sloped) of how it could look if someone takes the time to remove fascia,and add step flashing,and install shingles in a manner that goes under low sloped roofing,and then overlaps low sloped…This can be achieved without the use of any tar…by a professional roofer that has a little pride. By the way, those shingles are showing signs of either poor ventilation,or moisture between shingles and underlayment…curling,and buckling…I would tear off entire roof and start from scratch…(imo)

They have to pop off any trim and install metal flashing behind it. I like to use a piece of lead at the top because it bends in nice. Tar is a very bad singn on a new roof.

Did I hear this right? That pic is a new roof? I would call them back, and tell them to bring 20Sq. more shingles,and a saw to cut in a ridgevent,lol…and don’t forget a dumpster to put those shingles in , and some stepflashing…lol, and a pro. to install all of the above…

Looks like the discontinued 10X16 Ecostar Colonial slate. It was just to thin, which resulted in the curling that you see. It can get a lot worse!