TPO vs. Duro-Last

Hi Guys,

I have been researching like crazy, but cant really come up with a direct answer. I have a residential propery in Oklahoma, so I get snow, ice, sun, etc. The roof is about 2000sqft and I am trying to determine if Duro-Last is a better product than TPO? I got a quote for both, the TPO is 60 mil. and the duro-last is their standard product. What roofing system is the best? Ive felt both materials and they are definitly a different type of material. Any guidance will be greatly appreciated!

Regards

Rance

Since everyone expects me to reply, I will. DuroLast is a PVC sheet and TPO is, well, a TPO sheet. Different chemical make up. Both are good sheets and perform well. I think you will find DuroLast is more expensive. TPO is more popular and is less expensive.

Your comfort zone with the roofing contractor should guide your choice. If you find a contractor that gives you a complete estimate, has insurance, a license and does good work (after checking his references) then go for it.

Do not get in the middle of the TPO vs PVC battle…most of it is smoke and mirrors. If a contractor pulls that on you, walk away.

Duro-Last “or almost any PVC membrane” is much better. Its more of a time proven product. I also install TPO , its just a cheaper version . There are many recent articles about the many concerns reguarding TPO, you only need to do a simple google search.

Given a choice, I will choose PVC over TPO any day of the week. To me it’s a no-brainer.

Hi Everyone,

Thanks for the replys and your great answers. I am going with the duro-last contractor, ive seen many of his jobs and also called some references, so I think he will be a good one! i am sure you guys get tired of answering these same old questions, but i do appreciate it!
Thanks

Let me know in 12 years when ur roof starts shattering. Durolast is junk. Find a good PVC if you wanna go with that over TPO.

Give us some examples, I have found Duro-Last to be a pretty ethical company.

Durolast is the worst thing that ever happened to me.

Its overpriced 1st of all and not worth the extra cost.
Because the limited leak warranty holds under ponding water,
contractors will, ironically, not try to get rid of ponds so much.
If you complain about ponds, they’ll tell you not to be concerned becuase its under warranty.

3/4 of Durolast business is recover jobs, not reroof or new construction.
If you call a durolast sales rep, he’ll tell you on the phone that you stand a great chance of being able to recover your old roof and save a lot of money. This is their way of lowballing the job. The contractor will show up and give you an estimate based on a recover job even when in reality its an obvious tearoff. Tearoff is left as a $/square foot clause which allows a price quote that is sounds deceivingly low.

They’ll also tell you that tapered insulation is way overrated and not worth it. If you leave to the contractor, like I did, any hidden ventilation problems will be ignored. They will also use osb for decking. Osb might be OK for pitched roofs but for flat roofs, its a dumb idea, especially unventilated flat roofs.

All these items are the ways they get contracts signed and defray the cost of an overpriced membrane.
I was impressed with the durolast design engineer department - not so much with QC. The QC does not always follow the design engineering specs. QC approves every job. They inspected my completed roof job while there was 4 inches of ice and snow on it.
When I complained to the QC rep about the workmanship, he just told me that I would “learn to like the roof over time.”

Say NO to durolast

Ive installed 1 durolast roof, and dozens of TPO roofs… so keep in mind, my experience with Duro is limited.

I was impressed by the duro product itself… but not any more than with TPO. For the money, I think TPO is as good as the PVC. I have yet to have a single problem with any of my TPO roofs (none are over 5 years old yet, so we will see) as long as they are installed correctly/glued, or fastened down properly.

Like previously stated, i’d be more concerned with the installer and their methods of installation, than the product itself.

I’m still lost on the question. You have a residential property that has a flat roof and you want to use commercial roofing products on it? Usually better to add pitch on residentials?

Just not sold on TPOs or any other plastic tarp roofing system. I have done a lot of repairs last year on these. Venting systems are a must. Any areas not properly fastened/glued will start making little jupiter jumps.

Squirrels, crows, and pigeons are murder on these roofs. Especially crows.

I just inspected a 700 square 45 mil TPO last week that was a new install. Tons of problems with the job. Holes everywhere already. Property owner looks like he is witholding final payment. I would also worry about residential tree drops?

[quote=“famous”]I’m still lost on the question. You have a residential property that has a flat roof and you want to use commercial roofing products on it? Usually better to add pitch on residentials?

Just not sold on TPOs or any other plastic tarp roofing system. I have done a lot of repairs last year on these. Venting systems are a must. Any areas not properly fastened/glued will start making little jupiter jumps.

Squirrels, crows, and pigeons are murder on these roofs. Especially crows.

I just inspected a 700 square 45 mil TPO last week that was a new install. Tons of problems with the job. Holes everywhere already. Property owner looks like he is witholding final payment. I would also worry about residential tree drops?[/quote]

i put a TPO Flat roof on a $1,000,000 Stucco house with a flat roof 2 years ago. Should I have suggested that he add a pitched roof and completely ruin the aesthetics, and architectural design of the house?

tree drops? would falling trees not damage a shingle roof? (TPO is MUCH more resilient than asphalt shingles)

what types of repairs were you doing on TPO jobs? do you have a welder? if you were just slapping tar on top of TPO, thats not going to fix anything. and im going to keep disagreeing with you on this one too… birds? how does the bird damage TPO? next chance you get, pick up a TPO sample sheet. then take a flat head screw driver, and try to stab a hole in it. or cut a line in the center of the sheet, leaving only a couple of inches in tact on each end of the cut. then try your hardest to rip it apart. then weld two sheets together, and try to rip that apart.

now… installation problems are a different story. dont blame the product on a crappy install.

Jason,

Some people love TPO. I don’t. I believe torch down is superior. My opinion. I have a little experience with 45 mil and am just not impressed at all. I hear 60 mil is better. From what I have heard/seen, birds tend to pick at TPO. It has that little square pattern that just seems to intrigue crows and pigeons. That new roof I checked out was notorious for pigeons and I found what appeared to be some pecking marks already on a roof less than a month old.

I have a commercial roof buddy that first told me about this and I started looking for it. He is a torch down/hot tar guy so he is biased.

I get to see the bad on TPO’s since they are leaking and I don’t install them. I have also seen several tar patches which are a joke. Like putting gasoline in a styrofoam cup.

TPO, in my opinion, likes to fail at vertical corners and unsecured penetrations. Like you said earlier, likely installation errors.

In tree verses roof, I’ll take anything over metal or TPO. A blue tarp is even better because they are at least easy and cheap to replace.

To the OP, have you considered EPDM? From what I have seen you can save a lot of the cost and get nearly the same reliability as PVC.

Famous, doing a repair from a tree limb fallen on a membrane roof is no harder than a shingle roof if you know what you are doing. The tar patches that you have seen are not the proper way, obviously. In fact, its really easier to repair for a number of reasons, mainly cause the roof is flat and easy to get on.

EPDM is an exellent roof for the money, but like anything its critical thats its installed by a crew that knows what there doing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0WWGkY_1SE)

Im going next week to Saginaw, Michigan to see the factory for myself. Flying in style in there private jet, Looking forward to it.

I really don’t want to fan the flames in the pvc vs. tpo argument but I am somewhere in the middle. I agree with the other posts that say PVC is a proven product and has a performance history to back it’s performance. TPO does not have the same history of performance behind it. Now with that said, there are huge differences between PVC membranes. Sarnafil and Fibertite are some of the best ones out there while Durolast is one of the lower end PVC products. The 60 mil TPO membrane if installed correctly is a 20 year system. The Durolast is not. I would go with the TPO.

Sarnifil,FiberTite and also IB are very good membranes. Duro-Last also is a good membrane as far as we are concerned, there are some around the area over twenty years old. there are also Sarnafil roofs that are around thirty years old still in service. Will TPO last that long ? I do not know, but as a roofer I prefer working with PVC.