Roof intersection problem

Hey guys could you give me your thoughts on this? The other day I had a leak. From what I could find, it looked to be coming from this intersection. The valley at the bottom of the pic ends before the start of the roof with the skylight on the left. The water comes down the valley hits the wall and has to travel under and over the shingles. I cleaned out all the crap that was stuck under the shingles. I think the dirt plus the heavy winds and rain we had helped with the leak. Is there any way I can improve this location to prevent any further leaks? Thanks for any help you can give.
-Ian

http://www.streetneeds.com/uploads/misc/DSC00740.jpg

i believe the only permant solution would be to alter the roof line. i roofed a house last year that had 2 of these that have leaked since the 1950’s. i installed diamond shaped crickets/saddles to push the water past the “dead” point. sorry, i never took pics of it though.

Have fun with that one…

You are going to have to do a little bit of framing it looks like.

From what I can see it looks like the gable end of the house has to be extended to the other roof, creating a proper valley.
Is this an addition?
You must be in a warm climate, that detail won’t last too long in the snow and ice.

[quote="-Axiom-"]Have fun with that one…

You are going to have to do a little bit of framing it looks like.

From what I can see it looks like the gable end of the house has to be extended to the other roof, creating a proper valley.
Is this an addition?
You must be in a warm climate, that detail won’t last too long in the snow and ice.[/quote]

The house is only 4 years old. Just brought it a few months ago. We live in NJ 45mins north of AC. This means we can get some snow over the winter. The house has a 2-10 warranty. Would it cover design issues like this? I just left a vm for the builder. I bet hes not going to happily want to fix this.
Thanks -Ian

that is absolutly a design flaw…so if it is under warranty he should fix it. his framers and roofers should have questioned it when it was built! also expect your “valleys” to give out in about 10 more years. they are weaved which is not a recommended practice by the manufacture. it creates a pocket of air under the shingle which “bakes” the valley out prematurely. they will curl up and fall apart is what im getting at

More good news :(…What should the valley have? Could I call the manufacturer in to look at the roof and present that to the installer? Ask him to correctly install it.

well…the manufacture probably wont come out unless he is a factory certified installer and has registered a warranty with the manufacture…which in new construction is probably non existant (or close to it). he wont change the way the shingles are done in the valley. his warranty is probably for a “dry roof” not a correct roof. you probably wont run into the valley giving out until long after his roof warranty. i am just preparing you to expect to replace the roof at year 15 so its not a surprise. most manufactures recommend a closed cut valley. you can look up these terms on my website in glossary or go to www.gaf.com and you can find it.

[quote]The house is only 4 years old. Just brought it a few months ago. We live in NJ 45mins north of AC. This means we can get some snow over the winter. The house has a 2-10 warranty. Would it cover design issues like this? I just left a vm for the builder. I bet hes not going to happily want to fix this.
Thanks -Ian[/quote]

I agree 100% with Marshall, it is definitely a design flaw.
It shouldn’t have been built that way to begin with…
It is hard to believe that an architect approved that.
I usually see this type of stuff on additions, not on new builds.

IMO this needs to be framed correctly or it will be a continuous problem.
No amount of Ice & water shield is going to fix that for the long term.
It looks as though that area will hold a significant amount of water, no way for it to drain…

Do you have a couple of pics that show more of that area?
They may be helpful.

It would be a good idea to get the rest of the house checked out so that other repairs can be made while the home is still under warranty.
If they built it that way ( the roof ) from the beginning, there is probably other framing issues with the house, among other things…

I agree with Axiom who agrees with Marshal (even though Marshal keeps forgetting one additional “r” in manufacturer).

As for other photos, if you were to stand in the exact same spot & point the camera 35 degrees more to the L, we’d like to see this photo as well as a pic from the bottom of the valley pointed UP the valley.

From what I can see, the real problem is the roof line on the L that’s causing the trap needs to be / should have been extended all the way to the roof with the valley.

Or… frame a slope (steep roof deck) from the trapping wall down to the roof deck & add new valley metal in.

If I can find it, I’ll post a link to a prior thread here that discusses how to do a cutback valley vs. this nappy weave you have going on.

A have a few more pics at home but I will need to resize them. Would this be an issue the township code office should have seen? There are 30 other models in the development like this one. I wonder if they are all built like this.

Well, I don’t think “the architect shouldn’t have approved it”… I think the architect shouldn’t have DESIGNED IT that way.

Then the builder should have spotted this as a design flaw.

I don’t care how much ‘bathtubbing’ you do, this is an accident in the making; all it needs is time.

What a mess!! I will try and get the pics of the other angles today if there is light, if not tomorrow. Thanks for everyones help, it means allot.
-Ian

Well, I looked a bit but couldn’t find the thread. Not by topic title, anyhow. Often, we start with one line of questioning & diverge off into a whole new area.

Here’s a diagram on how to do a valley cutback; if you want a larger version (this site may compress the image to an unreadable size) then send me an Email or PM.

sell house.

gweedo.