New roof sloppy install

I recently had a roof installed on my house by Best Choice Roofing. The work was subcontracted out, which made me nervous from the begining. I have been in the house 10 years and I am just an educated home owner not a roofer.

There were some time line issues and scheduling delays but that is another story. Some things that I noted install wise was they did not strip all of the original tar paper from the decking on the back of the house. This was in the contract and leads me to believe the decking was not checked properly for water damage which is a possibility because I had quite a few blow offs on this part of the roof. They proceeded to install #15 paper over the existing and secured it loose fitting. They also did not replace all of the drip edge in areas where it looks like it would take extra work and cutting to fit it correctly, basically being lazy. Some of the drip edge is bent and damaged. They used Owens Corning starter strip plus but did not secure it close enough to the Eves and rake edges so you can pretty much lift the whole roof edge up easily and stick your hand under it.

There is 1.5-2 inches of overhang on the whole roof which is incorrect according to Owens Corning installation instructions with drip edge. They also botched up the flashing and siding on my screened in porch and did not bother to fix it correctly or say anything about it. I have uploaded a few picture and will upload a few more tomorrow when I get home from work.

It sounds like you’re more interested in bashing Best Choice Roofing than you are looking for a solution. It would be somewhat painful but not impossible to fix most of the things you bring up. Make up your punch list and call your Sales Rep or the Owner. Make them fix it.

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Not trying to nit pick, I just want the job done correctly and not a hacked fix. They did get back with me not to long after I made this thread and I expressed my concerns with the production manager. He says they are sending the roofers out again tomorrow.

What would be the proper way to replace the drip edge they didn’t replace? Is the overhang really a concern? All I know is the packaging for Owens Corning states 1/2 to 3/4 over hang when using drip edge.

It’s a PITA but they can remove the old drip edge and install new. While it isn’t a huge deal, they can trim the overhangs. Removing and replacing the starter would likely require removing some courses of shingles. While it is indicative of sloppy work, I wouldn’t get overly concerned about the felt left on. Only way to fix that is to remove the back slope.

Sounds like you got stuck with a poor crew. Subcontracting out crews isn’t a huge deal, probably 90% of the roofing contractors do it now. We do it but we tend to vet the crews, teach them our standards and monitor them fairly close until they prove themselves. We keep the good ones for years and mostly are their only or primary employer, so it is the next best thing to having an in house crew. For all kind of reasons, subcontracting out is the most financially feasible solutions these days. I do admire the “old time” roofers who can maintain an inhouse crew. Many of those though have to subcontract out some work if they get over loaded.

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Thanks for the insight. My only concern with trimming the overhang is trimming the adhesive off and having to reseal with roof cement. I’m going to see how things go tomorrow. I will update. Ill upload a couple more pictures of the job. As you can see it’s a pretty small house, 17 squares. I tried to not be super annoying and take pictures when they weren’t looking plus I was gone half of the day so I wasn’t home for most of it. Thanks again for the wisdom.

I will say I have seen other jobs(neighbors) that were way sloppier. Incorrect nail patterns, leaving the old felt with ripped portions from removal and shingling over it, not replacing any drip edge, running architectural shingles straight up and down. No ice and water shield in valley.

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