New Roof doesn't look right

#1

We had our new asphalt shingle roof installed yesterday. The work crew showed up at about 7:30 a.m. and worked until dusk to finish in one day, including the demolition of the chimney and replacing the rotted fascia on one side of the garage.

Could you provide an assessment of the installation? When I got my first look at it under the light of day today, I didn’t feel very good. The shingles appear lumpy and some of the edges are raised, including edges that butt up to the gutter guards. I have insufficient knowledge to be able to evaluate the job, or even know where to aim the camera.

The job was done in a single day, including tear-off, replacement of damaged decking, demolition of the chimney, valleys, replacing “turtle” vents with ridge vents, ice and water shield and clean-up.

I would very much appreciate some feedback from industry professionals. Advice on where to aim the camera would be welcome, too!

Lifted edges and "lumps"
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs451.snc3/25832_1240538302742_1507839357_30526841_5200385_n.jpg

More lifted edges and lumps. Is that a nail under the shingle on the right?
http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs471.snc3/25832_1240538342743_1507839357_30526842_3322948_n.jpg

One of several “ripples” visible–this one close to top left
http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs471.snc3/25832_1240538422745_1507839357_30526843_1065750_n.jpg

Sample of shingles lifted by gutter guards…we are replacing the fascia on the house next.
http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs471.ash1/25832_1240538502747_1507839357_30526845_6096980_n.jpg

Another section of visible edges
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs451.snc3/25832_1240538582749_1507839357_30526847_4964725_n.jpg

New flashing?
http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs471.snc3/25832_1240538662751_1507839357_30526848_433271_n.jpg

#2

That is typical of colder weather installation. Once you get some sun on it it will all lay down.
The gutter guard looks like it wasn’t installed back in the gutter properly, and thus is holding up the shingle.

#3

Where are you located at? The reason that I am asking is that if you live in an area where the warm weather has not yet started, then the first 2 pictures will be ok when it warms up and the shingle will flatten out. The third picture might be underlayment that is not laying flat, or maybe even the decking. You should ask your roofer if he can work on getting the gutter screens to lay flat, because that shingle should be laying flat.
Also, how many layers were ripped off? Judging by the big gap in the siding, you probably had a few layers of tear off. Once again, you should ask your roofer if he can work on that detail as well, but he might say that he is not responsible for that look. And those do look like new step flashing that are going underneath the siding. Maybe he make a custom piece of J-Channel out of aluminuim for you to cover that gap between the siding and the new roof.
Good luck and let us know how it goes, or maybe even post more pictures.

#4

We are located just south of Omaha, Nebraska. The weather yesterday was sunny with a high of 55 degrees.

The existing roof was only a single layer of shingles, which was torn off. What photo has the gap between siding and/or roof that you are referencing?

I will endeavor to get more pictures this weekend. What are the potential problem areas that I should focus on?

Thank you, and have a great weekend!

#5

The first couple of “hot” days it should lay flat. the gap at the roof to side wall flashing isnt his fault. He should get gutter cover down in gutter more (although they are junk anyway & dont work). Looks pretty standard to me overall.

#6

yeah ive seen worse, but i dont like the cheap
pipe collar they used and there edge metal work
leaves a bit to be desired.

your just gonna have to get used to it.

gweedo.

#7

They will lay down flat once the summer heat hits them. Pay your bill!

#8

2 flaws eaves are butted to drip and rakes are too, water wicking can occur. gutter screen is misinstalled. other than that it will settle down but the rake and eave is incorrect there shoul be at the rake a minimum 1/4 inch and 1 inch at the rake and i do not see that. the sad part is the instructions are on the back of each shingle wrapper.

#9

It doesn’t look like they used starters.

#10

typical look of shingles installed during a cold climate. They will lay flat soon enough.

Use of starters? I think they used them, although the picture showing the gutter under the plumbing flashing which axiom is referring does look like they didnt use starters, but i think that they are there.
check on it.

The plumbing flashing could use some extra work to get it to last the lifetime of the shingles. I do.
Although, that is pretty standard the way it is.

The “ripple” that you are referring is not the fault of the roofer. the original framer installed a short piece of sheeting (2 feet) and is why you see the dip.
It looked like that on the last roof.

Yes, that pitch change metal intersection would have been installed better by a good roofer.
But i dont think it is hurting anything and would do more damage than good trying to make it look better.
Unless i did it. :slight_smile:

Yes, that screen does need to be laying flat in that one gutter photo shot.

Looks like they need to do a lil bit of "punch out"
but nothing to be too alarmed about in these photos.

#11

Here in Michigan we get about 4 month of cold weather installs. We don’t install a lot of roofs in the winter, but when we do, I always warn the homeowners about the shingles not laying flat untill it warms up. But you still get people going “Holy S…t, is that how its supposed to be?”. Can’t make it real preatty when its low 20s outside :frowning:

#12

The reason and the only reason why your shingles look the way they do is because the roofers like most all roofers carry the shingles to the top of the ridge and they fold them over the ridge to keep them up on the roof.
Same old tired excuse is they will lay down when it gets warm. If the roofers knew what they were doing they would keep the shingles flat at ALL TIMES!!! Then install them. That excuse makes me want to puke.
This causes the waves you see. As stated above there is also some sloppy installation.

#13

Good point Stormer although sometimes you will get a bundle or two like that no matter how you stack them.

#14

[quote=“Stormer”]The reason and the only reason why your shingles look the way they do is because the roofers like most all roofers carry the shingles to the top of the ridge and they fold them over the ridge to keep them up on the roof.
Same old tired excuse is they will lay down when it gets warm. If the roofers knew what they were doing they would keep the shingles flat at ALL TIMES!!! Then install them. That excuse makes me want to puke.
This causes the waves you see. As stated above there is also some sloppy installation.[/quote]

you mean like THIS:

turnerroofing.com/

look at the top of their page. LOL. I still cant believe they used that as their main banner on the top of their website.

#15

[quote=“Stormer”]The reason and the only reason why your shingles look the way they do is because the roofers like most all roofers carry the shingles to the top of the ridge and they fold them over the ridge to keep them up on the roof.
Same old tired excuse is they will lay down when it gets warm. If the roofers knew what they were doing they would keep the shingles flat at ALL TIMES!!! Then install them. That excuse makes me want to puke.
This causes the waves you see. As stated above there is also some sloppy installation.[/quote]

Stormer, I never ever, ever ever have stacked bundles on the ridge. Especially in the cold, cause it will break the mat.
That being said I have installed plenty of roofs in the winter that have the lumps and bumps. Sometimes they are stored at the yard that way. It always lays flat in the heat.

#16

So according to you, Stormer, every roof I install in the winter and the shingle is not completly flat, is due to the fact that the bundles were stacked on the ridge? What about the fact that we never stack them that way at all. When we go to a job, we bring the shingles with us in a dump truck. The bundles are loaded unto the roof when they are needed and never on the ridge. And let me tell you, many of the roofs that we install in the winter look even worse than these pictures, and its not due to the fact that we stacked the bundles on the ridge. Not every shingle comes out of a bundle looking perfectly straight when its 20 outside.

#17

The ones toward the top of a pallet usually are… aw nevermind.

#18

The roof will flatten out when it gets warmer,that type of gutter guard sits flush against back of gutter and front lip it should not be under shingle like that.the reason its installed this way because its held in that way (Spring loaded so to speak) it will fall out eventually if not fixed. Also I always fold ends down tight so that there is no gaps on ends.It also looks like the gutter was not installed under drip edge.but I’ve seen alot worse roofs flatten out in hotter weather.

#19

I totally agree with roofer99.
I havent seen a roofer stack a ridge like that in my area from any company!!

And yes, i have seen shingles look much,much worse during winter installs. That is actually to be expected. Also, i believe that it happens more so with certain brands.

Any “ROOFER” or supplier knows that the shingles have to be stored/stacked as flat as possible.

Yes it’s true, the roof will look like crap if the shingles are not stacked flat.
I just always see the shingles stacked flat, and still see wavy architects during the cold.

#20

I’m willing to bet that the same carpenter was responsible for he short-sheeted decking at the rake and for the inconsistently-measured siding in the last picture. The roofer could paint that step flashing to make it disappear into the siding, and it will look better now, but in a few years the paint may start to come off and look nasty.

As for the plumbing boot, ask them to paint the metal base (you’ll be repainting it in a few years, too), and to cut the entire rubber seal out of another boot and place it down over the one you have. When the sun cracks the top one (yep, “in a few years”), then it can be replaced without lifting, replacing, or re-nailing any shingles, and the lower rubber seal will still be perfect.