New guy - did I pick the wrong company to work for?

#1

Hello.
I’ve been reading this form and trying to do this job for 2 to 3 months now. In some ways I am very much enjoying the job and can see a lot of potential. Not only to make money, but also to help people by delivering them a product that they both need and have largely paid for.
The group that I have just started working with – the group that introduced me to the idea of this career – is quite poorly managed on my local level, and I am unsure of the management above that.
Right now I am sitting outside of my very first build (day 4 of what I was told and told my customer was a 1 day job), hoping and praying that I actually get paid fairly. I don’t have much trust in my manager because much of what he said would happen has not come true. The training program is non existent and I’m finding myself in really uncomfortable situations. Today I was accused by a ladder guy on an insurance adjustment of causing missing shingles. I’m not even knowledgeable enough to know how to fake damage much less defend myself against accusations of doing it. I wasn’t prepared for that at all. I also had a company check declined at Home Depot while trying to buy furnace caps. There have been a lot of things that have made me question my decision to work for this company- but not really the job. I’m in debt by draw at the moment, week by week I feel myself drowning.
Do you have any advice?
Am I just a paranoid new guy?
What is the best way to find a company that is going to prepare me to do this work at my full potential?

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#2

I would tell you that if someone messes with my money (pay) that is it, I’m gone! I think you know the right decision and don’t need us to tell you what to do.

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#3

I am in the same position almost. I was working for a company, had some differences in opinion that boiled over, went to a different company, and am having problems again. They just have so much work they can’t handle it and don’t want to make changes to fix the problems. I’ve offered some ideas.

It is risky sometimes. Can get out and sign up a bunch of jobs, get down payments, and then they sit for a month, two months. Yeah, can be some weird positions with homeowners. Sometimes you have to take a shot and move on if it doesn’t work out. The goal should be either to get with a company that you can grow with, or start a company that people can grow with.

The next time I switch companies, it is me doing the interviewing. Why do I want to work for you? Are you looking to grow, or are you avoiding some issues and getting stuck in a rut? Big one. How much debt do you carry? How’s your taxes? What are you supplier relations? These are all big questions and some that won’t be answered until months down the road when you’ve got $200k worth of work signed up and one a week is going on.

BTW, if you are reading this, are you hiring? LOL

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#4

Where are you located. We have zero debt, we pay for material before it is delivered. Always have.

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#5

I’m in Louisiana. I use your waste calculator all the time too! Very accurate.

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#6

I have only ever worked on the commercial side but I know all the reputable residential contractors in my town. I would ask around with other people in the industry to see what they say. Suppliers often know who is a good company and who isn’t.

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#7

Dtris has the best idea. Take a suppliers salesman (or two) to lunch and pick his brain. Let him know why you want to have the discussion. Most supply guys may not want to go to lunch, but insist, this will give them a chance to think about a response before just giving you a name. At lunch, dive right in to your discussion about the potential you see in this industry, talk little about the company you work for, maybe just talk about the lack of training and/or mismanagement. Do not slam them, that makes you look mad or weak, rise above the past and just look to the future. Good luck!

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#8

i would look for a new company to work for

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