Long Island valley's without roof cement?

Can I install a Long Island valley without using any roof cement?

Here’s a couple pictures of what I am talking about.

There was no roof cement used anywhere in the valley. Not even under the shingles that run up the valley under the ones I am holding up. No cement used to hold down what I am holding up. NOTHING.

That’s a California valley and is used extensively by shortcutters so it stands to reason that the extra step of laying a 2" wide bead of plastic cement down the valley would be omitted.

I’m not a fan of California valleys but everything in the picture looks good.

It will be fine as it is.

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Here is where I picked up the name Long Island Valley

http://www.roofer911.com/roofing-articles/roofing-valleys.htm#sthash.70O6epOY.dpbs

He has his bleeder shingle upside down but otherwise looks good.

It is done correctly.
Even if there isnt any cement used here.
Know that it was never there
for water-tightness.
It is for preventative in case of a Strong hurricane.

In Northern CA where I broke in this technique was used to keep sloppy roofers from sinking their T blade into hot shingles while cutting valleys. It is definitely a short cutters detail. I love seeing other people’s work with different color 3 tab bleeders on an architectural comp.

How is this shortcut, nobody that I know of complained about this method since I started 8 yrs ago.can you elaborate potential drawbacks in your opinion .i use it too and never got any issues.
As far as I understand there is no difference qhatsoever, same run on the auxiliary side and the only difference is extra line of shingle diagonally, I use 1 3/4 nails for first row on main run because 1/4 not enough to penetrate when you use this method thru 3 shingles.so I’m not sure why everyone bitching it.yes it looks bulging and curses might be less than 6 inch but i always make sure you cut on the left.closed cut is tedious ,imma save my knuckles

You answered your own question at the end of your post. “Yes it might be bulging…”

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Cutting shingles is a basic skill easily learned.

If you have men that can’t cut shingles straight or without cutting the underlying roofing why in the hell are they installing shingles in the first place?

It’s just more dumbed down roofing.

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Lol,I haven’t said that we cant.its just unnecessary extra labor.double duty.same performance more for looks.

Asus,
Most roofers in our area run California valleys and their customers don’t know or care. I have even seen them on the old 40 and 50 year Elk. We try to do things to differentiate ourselves and little things like this all add up and lead to more company pride. You’re not doing anything wrong but to become high end, in our area at least, these little things add up to the big picture we are after. Oh and also more $$$. Easy new construction comp 5-12 we can charge $275 per all day long and single layer tear off starts at $425. That’s not even getting into what we can get for steep high end jobs with a demanding, and wealthy, clientele. It’s a process but it pays off.

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And just to add, a decent roofer can cut a 30 foot valley in about 10 minutes.

I snap a valley line and cut them as I go, I can cut 3 at a time with a shingle for a straight edge.

This way it’s easy to crop the shingles.

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If there is valley metal I can cut my left side perfectly as I shingle without a line, nail shingle on, cut it. Right side I struggle with that way because it’s kind of backhanded.

If you ever went to an ELK seminar during the 90’s, this was the preferred method for all laminate shingles. The programs were called, " A whole different animal" During the 90’s, ELK Corp discontinued the 20yr sunseal shingle and was the only manufacture exclusively making laminates. I’ve installed this same style, we in Texas call it the Cali valley, on 1000’s of homes with Never a call back.