Homeowner seeking ideas for asphalt product that replicates look of cedar shake

Hello. I live in Connecticut and have a 1977 white colonial-style house and the roof needs to be replaced (has 2 layers of asphalt on there now). Though I always dreamed of adding a cedar roof, the pricing and maintenance required (plus insurance etc) has me revisiting asphalt, which I usually don’t love (when I see it on most houses that is).

I would like some ideas for products that replicate the look of a wood shake, particularly the thickness and shadow lines. The best one I have found so far is Certainteed Grand Manor - I like that it is not just thick but uniform. Some of the shingles in this category seem to try to replicate the look by being obviously irregular, and I am not a fan (like Certainteed Presidential).

Thank you for your time and ideas.

Grand manor will only look good on a steep roof or a roof that sits below the road. It is an impressive shingle, like a lot of other high end products, and is very thick. However it doesn’t translate to curb appeal on standard pitch houses. Pay double and it looks like most limited lifetime shingles.

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This is good to know; I don’t know what my roof pitch is but I do know it looks like it’s flat from the 1970s vs. steep from the 18th and 19th century homes in my town.

Just a thought, but have you considered a stone coated steel product? Some of the profiles look more like shakes than any asphalt shingle.

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Interesting. I will check it out some more - a quick browse makes me think it does a better job mimicking clay tile than anything, but maybe I just need to find better photos.

Appreciate the tip!

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GAF Glenwood is the closest to a shake in my opinion.

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Just took a look at the GAF glenwood.
Man that looks nice!
Im interested.
I believe them about the thickness.
Their ultras are crazy thick.

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How often do you guys install specialty shingles? I honestly think it’s been 10 years since I installed anything other than a standard arch or 3 tab. If they want something more exotic I try to sell metal/slate/ect.

Actually wait, I installed grand manor on a new construction job early 2019 but probably the 10 years prior didn’t touch a specialty shingle.

Definitely recommend Glenwood - GAF product

Just realized Glenwood was something my roofer mentioned in an email to check out. Thank you!

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Island,
We install miles of Presidential and Pres TL but any comp that costs more than that, like Glenwood, we usually steer the customer towards metal if they like it. Glenwood is a very thick shingle but I am not confident in any composition at this point. No matter how thick a shingle is if the granules don’t stay on or cracks occur it will fail. We are tearing off a 27 year old Presidential roof right now (125 sq 8-12 home) and it was just toasted on Southern exposures. Three tab used to last longer. Discouraging but good for business.

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Yeah, I try to steer clear for the same reason. If someone has extra $ to spend I try to use a product I have more faith will actually have a really long lifespan.

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This is a great point. I like metal roofing as a homeowner (though the hickory tree we live under would be loud each fall!). Our ballpark est from the roofer we’ve been talking to put a standing seam at more $$ than the cedar (not factoring maintenance). But if it is a forever kind of thing, I’d be open to it. Not many standing seam houses here in CT though I have seen a few. Maybe I should be looking at metal shingles.

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Standing seam is a lifetime roof…provided it is installed by a great roofer. Trouble is it’s one of the most difficult systems for mediocre roofers to do the detail and flashing work in ways that make it a true lifetime roof

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Island you are correct. By the time I price these 9 bundle per sq, starter and specialty ridge, I’m offering a concealed, 26 gauge Mueller panel. My glenwood option came up because the existing home had an aluminum shake shingle. I’m not going to name them, because the manufacture would not sell me material. They refer you to an “authorized dealer” who happens to be an exclusive installer in my area. Forget that. I was bidding a pool house, about 2500 sq ft for one of my remodelers that I have done 100,000 sq ft of roofing for, since we met. Once I told him the deal, I looked at Glenwood as the closest option. It’s crazy money, but it’s an option.
Sorry for off topic, but I’m not a fan of exclusive products. How many thousands of roofs do they screw themselves out of.
P.S. y’all like my 100000 sq ft of roofing, don’t you. I bet yall are editing your websites with that one. Feel free to use it. I’m using talk to text so if it spells things crazy, you know. I’ve had to edit it 3 times.

Island, you are spot on. People ask me for a ‘per square’ price for metal and I laugh (without them hearing hopefully). I tell them I can have a three man crew install a 20 square gable to gable shop building in 8 hours. Add three skylights and a few valleys and that same square footage takes three days. Detail work takes longer on metal than any other type of roofing in my opinion and we do tons of tile. Also, we don’t install 26 gauge unless it is a low budget job. In our area we have 50 degree swings in the spring and 30-40 all summer. Oil canning is terrible with 26 gauge.

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And the guys who ask you for a price “per sq” are always the ones with 5 skylights,2 chimneys and every panel is a hip or a valley panel (no square edge panels). :sweat_smile:

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“Ball park. I won’t hold you to it”

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My favorite tool is my 3 month old, makita 20volt, cordless nibbler. How did I ever live without the cordless.

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