Flat roof to pitched roof

I’m interested in purchasing a building that’s 25 X 100ft for a loft conversion in the North Side of Pittsburgh PA. The trouble is that it has a leaky flat roof. What am I looking at to pull off the old flat roof (Approx cost per sq foot)and replace it with a pitched roof? Is this a doable thing or will the costs be prohibitive?

Hi,

Why do you want to put on a pitched roof?

How old is the roofing material that is on there now?

Dear Drums45,

It’s a smart move to put some slope on that roof if there is none.

It would be a pricey proposition to truss it out for a sloped roofing, and you don’t really need to do that. All you really need is enough slope so the roof drains rather than ponding water. A 1/4" slope per foot is sufficient.

The easiest way to do that is to install a tapered system between the roof deck and the new roofing.

John C Bishop
www.roofingsecrets.com

SPAMMER!!!

We need to eliminate this guy’s post, and inform him this is not a place to advertise his “secrets.” And this is coming from me, a consultant, who could do nothing but profit from homeowners and businessmen trying to roof their own buildings.

First of all, you are more likely to have a low-sloped roof than you are a flat-roof.

Next, you need to tell me what kind of low-sloped roof is currently on the building, and does it transition to a sloped metal, shingle, slate, shake, etc., type roof.

Then, we can talk about maybe adding slope to your roof, or what type of roof system would be best for you.

BTW, if you have a stone-aggregate surfaced built-up roof system, it could be either asphalt or coal-tar pitch. The best way for YOU to know, would be to find some of the bitumen that you can smell. If it smells like road-work, it is asphalt. If it smells like telephone poles, it is coal-tar pitch. :mrgreen:

Dear Cerberus,

I’ve been called a lot of things over my life but this is the first time I’ve been called a spammer!

I’m new to this forum and haven’t been able to find the Terms of Service regarding signatures. I think most forums allow leaving a URL to one’s website, which seems like a fair exchange for taking the time to answer questions.

I’ve noticed other posters doing this on this forum and assumed it was an acceptable practice. If not, perhaps the moderator could clarify this for me?

Thanks much,

John C Bishop
www.roofingsecrets.com

[quote=“John C Bishop”]Dear Cerberus,

I’ve been called a lot of things over my life but this is the first time I’ve been called a spammer!

I’m new to this forum and haven’t been able to find the Terms of Service regarding signatures. I think most forums allow leaving a URL to one’s website, which seems like a fair exchange for taking the time to answer questions.

I’ve noticed other posters doing this on this forum and assumed it was an acceptable practice. If not, perhaps the moderator could clarify this for me?

Thanks much,

John C Bishop
www.roofingsecrets.com[/quote]

It doesn’t affect me one way or another, since almost all of my work is commercial. However, do you really expect a roofing forum to embrace you telling people to do it themselves and not use a roofer?

Actually, the more I think about it, this could be a boom for the roofers. :mrgreen: Of course, it will also end up costing the homeowner more if they screw-up, since doing it twice is always more expensive than doing it right the first time (hiring a professional).

Of course, you now have me wondering what it is that you are selling to people for $17. And would I be correct in assuming you generally address sloped shingle roofs? Naturally, someone could also log on here ask the very question they need answered for free. But I guess if you can get people to pony-up $17, good for you! I bill out my services at $90/hr, but in here I provide my services for free.

Dear Cerberus,

We could probably sort this out better over a beer or a cup of coffee, but barring that, perhaps Drum45 will forgive us for straying off topic.

I guess I’m missing something here. I thought this forum is for “Roofers and People With Roofsâ€Â

I don’t drink much coffee, so it would have to be over a beer. Then again, I don’t drink much beer either, but when I do it has to be a Bass Ale or something along those lines.

John, I’m not trying to give you a hard time. That was not my intention. I just thought it strange that you would come here looking to sell your product; that’s all. At first, I thought you were a spammer, but I guess not.

Yes, $90 and hour is cheap, but it is because I live in Houston. I was billed out at a higher rate more than 10 years ago when I was living on the east coast. Then again, my house here would have cost 2 - 3 times as much on the east coast.

As for your 22 years as a roofer. What kind of background do you have in roofing? Were/are you a shingler? Slater? Sheet-metal worker? Just curious, that’s all!

As for me, the first roof I ever worked on was back in 1981. It was 36,000 squares (over 82.6 acres) of 4-ply coal-tar pitch over two layers of fiberglass insulation. It took over a year to roof, flash, and finalize as it was new construction. After that project, I continued doing BUR, Mod. Bit., EPDM, GRM, PVC, Mod. Asphalt, 3M, sheet-metal, and on and on, including bituthene and Vulkem below-grade waterproofing. I have done some shingle and slate work, but don’t list roofs like that since it isn’t ever how I made a living.

Dear Cerberus,

I am going to answer your questions about my roofing background here, but after that I think we should shift to private messaging because we are straying so far off topic. So anyway, here’s my bio…

I was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1953.

After High School, I enlisted in the Navy and graduated from Basic Underwater Demolition Seal Class #66. I mention that experience because it has influenced my attitude ever since. I feel like I can do any damn thing I set my mind to… but have learned otherwise on occasion!

After four years in the Navy I attended two years of community college and married Martha, my high school sweet heart. We’ve been married 31 years now and have three great kids who are grown and off on their own.

In 1978, I started my business career as a design draftsman for a machine tool company in Michigan. It was there I first learned and embraced some universal design principles such as “Form FOLLOWS Functionâ€Â