Covering the whole roof with water and ice guard for low slope roof

#1

I have a low-sloped roof, somewhere between 2/12 to 3/12 max. It has been shingled and reshingled since it was built. A roofer gave me an estimate, which includes water and ice guard some 3 feet past the warm wall. When I read the manufacturers’ warranty (Certainteed) requirements, it said that for low slope roofs the whole roof should be covered with water and iceguard. I told this to the roofer, and he said OK.

What bothers me, why is it that I - the client - have to do the research for the professional roofer. He surely must have known about it, and the cost saving is not that great. The saving grace is that he always complies with my requests. How should I read this situation?

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#2

If you had to guess, how old is he?

I suspect inexperience.

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#3

Thank you, Axiom. The guy is in his early 60s and has been in the business for some 40 years. I suspect that the gentleman is given to hype and hyperbole. While he does a good job overall, he has a tendency to cut corners, and I have to watch him to make sure he does not. Otherwise, he does a good job (he did another roof job for me before), keeps his word, does not argue when I make a suggestion, comes when he says he would come - qualities that I do not often find with many contractors. So, it is a mixed bag.
P. S. I can say all this since I am overall a do-it-yourselfer with quite a bit of experience in construction. In any case, I research the technology, the newest materials and techniques before I do anything or let anyone do anything for me.

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#4

Hopefully he wasnt trying to cut corners.
He does have another correct option that he was probably going to do besides the Ice and water shield along the bottom and that is Two -ply the felt underlayment on the rest of the roof.
But if he didnt originally say he was going to do that, than that is an important detail to leave out.
i only suggest this in areas where there is not significant snow.
And dont two-ply synthetic underlayment on low slopes because it still sucks…

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#5

Thank you, roof_lover. I will consider this option after I check with the manufacturer regarding their warranty.

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#6

Is the installer Shingle Master Certified?

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#7

I refuse to shingle anything under 3/12 if they want to shingle a 2/12 they can find somebody else. Under 4/12 all ice and water.

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#8

Thank you. Yes, one roofer would only do EPDM.

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#9

Yeah, i’m a big believer that any roof that I wouldn’t be confident installing shingles without 100% ice and water really has no business having shingles installed in the first place.

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#10

He probably thought the cost would be too high and you wouldn’t choose him for the job so he left off some I&W.

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#11

Thank you, donl. This makes sense, but I am an idealist and hope this isn’t true. Anyway, I told the roofer to cover the whole roof with the I&W and add the cost of the rolls to the total. The work starts in a couple of weeks.
My other problem with contractors (roofing, plumbing, construction, etc.) is that they come, appear full of ideas, and then do not send me an estimate or even return my phone calls. Rude. What gives?
“My” roofer keeps his word, at least, and does a good job, but requires some “supervision.”

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#12

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

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#13

Thank you, Justin. I have EPDM on the garage roof, and even here we applied tapered ISO. For the main house, we did not think that EPDM would look good (correct me, if I am wrong), so we are doing the best we can by using I&W guard over the entire roof, which bumped the cost up almost a grand. The house was built in 1955 and has had a shingled roof all that time, with nary a problem. I guess we will have to be vigilant going forward.

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#14

Are you installing 3 tab singles and do you live where there is no snow or ice?

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#15

Just an FYI, the old three tab style roofs have better water shedding ability than the new dimensional style shingles. If you really insist on shingles I really recommend you stick with that style.

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#16

Thank you for asking. I live in southwest Ohio, and we have rain, snow, and wind… at the northern edge of the tornado alley. The manufacturer (Certainteed) will warranty the shingles if the entire roof is covered with the I&W.

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#17

Interesting, never thought of that. I guess the dimensional shingles present more surface area for the wind to catch on and lift the shingles. Makes aerodynamic sense. The exisiting shingles are the three-tab variety, and there is no hint of them being bent backwards by the wind. I am, obviously, more worried about rain being driven upwards under the shingles.

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#18

No, that’s not what I meant. What you are describing would be their ability to withstand strong winds. Dimensional shingles (provided they are nailed correctly) do hold up better to high winds.

What I meant was because dimensional shingles don’t lay as flat (by design) as 3 tab shingles they are more prone to water wicking in horizontally (esp on lower pitches). I’ll see if I can find a link anywhere that describes my point.

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#19

Watch at 6:55 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xwReRwQYO0

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#20

Agreed with island roofing.
Great Great video!
Everyone needs to see this!
Malarky Explains why almost all these other manufactures designs are inferior.
And it is super important on these lower slope shingle roofs.
So even with full ice and water shield or two ply of asphalt saturated felt…
I would ONLY use a 3-tab shingle design
Or Atlas or Malarky architect shingles because of their proper nailing zone…

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