Circular saw blade for shingles?

I’ve just done a shingle job on a 150 year old barn and it looks great. Only thing I’m unhappy with is the hangover on the edges. I want to snap a line and cut the hangover on all edges so that it’s straight and true. Are there any good 7 1/4" circular saw blades that are up to this task?


havent tried them but looks ok for single deal

I don’t think a saw blade will clean up a rake edge unless it’s a really thick shingle. I and all of my better roofers could do it with a hook blade on a warm day. Is that not an option for you?

Yeah I don’t know. It’s an architectural shingle and is pretty thick. If I could snap a chalk line and saw off the excess easily without having to hack out it with a utility knife then that would be fantastic.

If it was only that easy. I don’t think it’ll do much more than tear the shingles and ball up in the saw. Hook blades are designed to cut shingles. I trim as I go, using the top edge of a shingle as a guide. Anyway, definitely let us know how that works out!

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Cicural saw Will make a mess. Hook blade would be the standard, also have heard guys say the dewalt hook blade for the oscilating saw works great, bought one but never tried it.

DEWALT Oscillating Tool Blade, Multi-Material (DWA4214) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FMHPX62/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_InZ6EbSB2Z646

If you are having a hard time using a hook blade, try an old paid of large tin snips. We use them in the winter and they work great, just realize they won’t be any good for cutting metal after.

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Not only would a circular saw make a mess, I think it presents a very real potential safety hazard. I like MPA’s recommendation of the Oscillating Tool Blade for a cleaner cut and hopefully, safer.

I cringe anytime someone suggests using a circular saw to cut shingles.

I’ve done this, it makes a mess, ruins your saw, throws granules and little specks of asphalt all over the place and makes poor cuts to boot.

I file this under “utterly retarded”.

The proper way to cut shingles is with a hook blade, the only other acceptable way would be with tin snips or other scissor type device.

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All I use for grand manors and dimentionals below 50 degrees is shears, but if you try to cut a rake with shears after it is installed it can get really hacked up.

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