Allstate Insurance new formula to Adjust roof


#21

[quote=“rooferama”]I agree with Authentic Dad.

The state of Texas sent out a memo to my office and I assume since it was a form letter, most every other Roofing, Siding, Remodeling company…etc… in the state. Cutting to the chase, it was a warning for listing anything that represented the company as being an insurance claim specialist or similar.
This letter was followed up with a curt call from the Texas Department of Insurance. It was to threaten us about a line on our website that said, we will meet with your adjuster to see that you receive a fair claim. Ok, I understand, but that line was buried in one of our outdated pages from 1997 that no one even knew existed. They sure found it. We removed it. We were then told that when meeting an adjuster, we were not to discuss money. We could point out damage, submit our appraisal, but not to discuss cost because we are not the insured. If we act as an adjuster for the HO, then we are to be licensed. If we act as the licensed adjuster, we cannot legally participate in the project.
Texas has some new points that surfaced during the past summer.

***nsurers cannot utilize roofers as de facto public insurance adjusters nor provide commissions to them in the form of direct or indirect payments or rebates that are in excess of amounts owed under the policy.

Insurance claims managers should take this warning to heart when developing internal claims guidelines. Insurance company and independent adjusters should not encourage illegal conduct by negotiating claims with roofers or insurance restoration contractors. At the same time, it is important for those same insurance adjusters to fully investigate claims and carefully consider roofers’ and contractors’ professional estimates and opinions. Legitimate contractors have expertise that can aid all adjusters in arriving at accurate estimates of loss.

The distinction between negotiating a loss and seeking information might be fine, but it is legally significant. The policyholder, not the contractor, has the right to negotiate the insurance claim. A roofing contractor cannot determine the rights and benefits owed to a policyholder. In fact, roofers and contractors who interpret policy language and negotiate policy benefits are acting illegally. These bulletins should be taken seriously because continued illegal activities could lead to significant civil and criminal penalties. ***

Too bad TDI isn’t doing much of anything to resolve the root cause problem, that is, all the bad faith claim practice going on. The Contractor shouldn’t have to discuss price and wouldn’t have to if the claims were scoped properly. Just more crooks sucking up our tax dollars and then jamming up our behinds. Pathetic. I can’t believe CatCONtractor hasn’t done an eight page cut and paste post on this thread. LOL[/quote]


#22

:lol: I think CatContractor cape must at the drycleaners. He is powerless without it.


#23

UPDATE: So my customer asked for a re-inspection and All State told him that they would just send out the same adjuster. He then contacted the adjuster and asked him why he didn’t get on the roof, the adjuster told him it was to steep. My customer is now emailing the adjuster and his agent asking for an appraisal to be done, along with letting his agent know that he will be taking his business elsewhere if nothing is done.


#24

I wish you luck. The agent, unless his book of business is very large will have very little effect on this claim. The adjuster might have to reinspect the property but it will likely be with a ladder assist or 3rd party contractor who’s opinion is bought and paid for by insurance dollars.

Depending on your location appraisal may be a problem also. You may consider speaking with a good public adjuster or bad faith attorney before moving forward.

Good luck.


#25

I had a 156 shingles being repaired, I let the adjuster finish his ridiculous inspection, I then waited for the adjuster to get down off of the roof… He said well we are going to pay to repair 156 shingles… I played along and acted like he was doing the homeowner justice… He was all smiles until he started walking to his car and I asked him if was on his way to another adjuster appointment, he replied yes… I said well I need you to finish up this appointment first, he replied I already did… I said no we are just getting started I said we need to get back on the roof and show me which 156 shingles we are replacing… He responded that is impossible, I said well it cannot be because you came up with the number and I just need to make sure we replace the right 156… I said surely you know which shingles that you deemed damage, He got pissed and bought the whole roof.


#26

Hello All,
I am new to this forum. Being a third generation insurance repair contractor (Macon, GA) I have extensive experience in insurance repair and all the processes involved. I am also experienced in the insurance appraisal process, both as an appraiser and an umpire.

Using the appraisal clause detailed in the policy can be a useful tool to settle an insurance claim, but it is not a magic bullet. For example, the only issues that can be settled in appraisal pertain to value. All other issues (coverage, for example) cannot be decided by appraisal. So, if an insurance company decides that a roof failed due to improper installation rather than wind (their current favorites are high nailed and/or overdriven fasteners), then the appraisal clause cannot be invoked to decide that issue.

There are plenty of other tools available to work with insurers to provide a fair claim settlement.

Rooferama and other posters are correct regarding contractors actings as an advocate for homeowners. Care must be taken so that the contractor is not viewed as acting as a clams adjuster without a license. the fines and penalties for adjusting without a license can be severe. One defense against that is to secure a public adjusters license. You don’t have to use the license or even tell anyone you have it.

Chris Cole
Sentry Construction Company, Inc.
Macon, GA


#27

Allstate now uses a “matrix” which the adjuster inputs the size of the slope and the number of damaged shingles on that slope. Their matrix will figure a repair unless there are 14 or more damaged shingles per square. It is easier to get a full roof replacement for hail than it is for wind because for hail they want a test square on each directional facing slope, as long as each slope has 14+ hail hits in the square the matrix should approve it for replacement. For wind on the other hand, each slope must have 14+ damaged shingles/square for the entire slope!! So if the front slope is 10 squares for example the matrix will repair it unless it has over 140 wind damaged shingles. Then you will need another 140 damaged shingles on the back as well to get the entire roof(gable style, hip all 4 sides).

As far as a brittle test, I have found it comes down to the adjuster. Most I have met will do the brittle test and pass it no matter what, but the last one I met was in NC for CAT and failed the brittle test, took a picture of it, told both myself and the homeowner he was going to try to do a full replacement due to the brittleness of the shingles. I even heard him talking on the phone to his manager about how the shingles had no granules left and crumbled in his hands doing a BT but then the homeowner gets their estimate to repair per shingle!! Any suggestions for this one? I was dumbfounded!

By my experience Allstate has all their adjusters so scared to approve an entire roof they repair them all, even when they know it should be replaced. I had one adjuster say how Allstate reinspected 13 roofs and 11 of the 13 shouldn’t have been replaced and those adjusters were charged back for the overpayments.(They may have been “let go” as well!!). Apparently, this is the reason they came up with this matrix which is completely unfair to their customers and mine as well!!

Just my two cents…


#28

[quote=“RhinoNC”]Allstate now uses a “matrix” which the adjuster inputs the size of the slope and the number of damaged shingles on that slope. Their matrix will figure a repair unless there are 14 or more damaged shingles per square. It is easier to get a full roof replacement for hail than it is for wind because for hail they want a test square on each directional facing slope, as long as each slope has 14+ hail hits in the square the matrix should approve it for replacement. For wind on the other hand, each slope must have 14+ damaged shingles/square for the entire slope!! So if the front slope is 10 squares for example the matrix will repair it unless it has over 140 wind damaged shingles. Then you will need another 140 damaged shingles on the back as well to get the entire roof(gable style, hip all 4 sides).

As far as a brittle test, I have found it comes down to the adjuster. Most I have met will do the brittle test and pass it no matter what, but the last one I met was in NC for CAT and failed the brittle test, took a picture of it, told both myself and the homeowner he was going to try to do a full replacement due to the brittleness of the shingles. I even heard him talking on the phone to his manager about how the shingles had no granules left and crumbled in his hands doing a BT but then the homeowner gets their estimate to repair per shingle!! Any suggestions for this one? I was dumbfounded!

By my experience Allstate has all their adjusters so scared to approve an entire roof they repair them all, even when they know it should be replaced. I had one adjuster say how Allstate reinspected 13 roofs and 11 of the 13 shouldn’t have been replaced and those adjusters were charged back for the overpayments.(They may have been “let go” as well!!). Apparently, this is the reason they came up with this matrix which is completely unfair to their customers and mine as well!!

Just my two cents…[/quote]

You are absolutely correct, adjusters tend to err on the side of the company in situations like this. The appraisal process is tailor made for these situations, and I use it exclusively for these types of issues, with 100% effectiveness. Ultimately the use of appraisal will swing the pendulum back to the center, after all nobody in business likes to pay to pay.

Joe Grasso
Grasso Public Adjusters
TX / OK / NJ
855-247-2776


#29

Lol at the letter from the Department of Insurance. Here in Georgia at least, and I quote my homeowner, “The Insurance Commission is a total joke and it seems like they just cannibalized the DMV for incompetent hourly workers.” (Again, that line is courtesy of one of my homeowners! I laughed when she said it. Hard.)

If I want to read my client what their policy says, then I will. Without pulling a CatContractor, I will simply say “First Amendment” and anybody who doesn’t like it can piss and moan into a jar all they want. As long as I am not “practicing law without a license” by representing them in court, which I am not paid enough to do anyways, I just plan on doing as I damn well please.

Look guys, the Appraisal Clause is simple, and it is worth its weight in gold. Every Allstate claim I take to Appraisal gets bought. Period, no exceptions. Travelers Insurance however, has decided there is “no such thing as the appraisal clause.” They have tried to pull that on several of my claims in the past two weeks. However, I advise both them and my homeowner that it is written on page 13 of every standard Travelers policy in Georgia. I can understand why Travelers Insurance hates me having that knowledge, and why they and the other Carriers pay their lobyists to shut us up. Knowledge is power, and that power costs them a lot of money.


#30

Reroofga, give me a call sometime. I believe that we can benefit each other.


#31

What do I need to do for the appraisal form? How does this work? Allstate is turning down every roof.


#32

Where would we get Envoke The Right To Appraisal Form and Do we send back thru their General Fax/Email? Do you have a Sample of the form I can use as a guide?


#33

Word of caution…if you repair a roof that has the Atlas Chalet or Alpine shingle then you are in violation of IRC building code chapter 9. Atlas has issued letters to insurance carriers and others about making repairs. The warranty would be void for any remaining shingles and Atlas has refused to issue repair instructions/guidelines for those shingles as they are opposed to it. Manufacturer instructions must be followed.

Also, in GA appraisal only works for disputes over price not coverage. So, if you are disputing that the roof needs to be replaced and not repaired…you must take it to court. Appraisal will not work.


#34

Do you service the Buford/ Dacula area. I’ve never filed a claim however I’ve been told don’t even try so I haven’t.


#35

Sounds to me like he gave you that one because he didn’t want to get on the roof and you let him off the hook. I’d take that every time. Every. Time.