Your thoughts about tear-offs


#1

Hi all,

The most awesome ripping I’ve seen is on Utube as “cedar shingle tear off” where the guy uses a Lull scoop. Man! I should’ve thought of that.

Most of the guys I’ve worked with hate stripping. They generally agree that the easier jobs aren’t too bad, but definitely dread the rougher conditions, particularly head-breakers, bent-overs, and uneven boards.

Has anybody tried, seen, or heard of equipment that actually makes it less miserable to tear off such roofs?

Any unique solutions out there?


#2

Tearing off an old roof doesn’t take a lot of special skill. Basically, you just pry up the shingles using a pitchfork or shovel. Before you begin a tear off, protect trees and shrubs near the house by leaning up plywood sheets.

Locate a construction dumpster, pickup, truck or other container close to the roof. Toss the shingles directly into the container to save from having to pick them up later and to prevent nails from getting lost in the lawn. You may even want to build a temporary chute to funnel shingles into the container. If you’re using a pickup or trailer, be careful not to overload it.

It might be helpful for you??

or You can use… EPDM

Liquid Rubber


#3

Tearing off may not require a lot of skill, but if don’t know what you are doing you can make it more difficult than what it needs to be.

The man told me a long time ago that if its hard you must be doing it wrong.


#4

[quote=“THE OUTLAW ROOFER”]Tearing off may not require a lot of skill, but if don’t know what you are doing you can make it more difficult than what it needs to be.

The man told me a long time ago that if its hard you must be doing it wrong.[/quote]

Kudos outlaw, that was exactly my point


#5

liqudroof,
roofbutcher does not need to know how to tear a roof
off.
you crack gweedo up.

gweedo.


#6

Thanks Gweedo. Pleased to meet you, btw. Sorry ‘bout the Florida thing. Hope it’s not too hot down there.

In all fairness to Liquidroof, his info could prove helpful to the noobs and the DIY-ers, who should also know about hanging a tarp to keep the black marks off the siding, and also the advent of the power ripper. :wink:

As far as using his nice coatings in a tear off, that too might help make a bull strip more enjoyable. They could possibly buy enough extra time to find someone else to do it, which is one of the more ultimate, if not overly hopeful solutions!


#7

[quote=“THE OUTLAW ROOFER”]Tearing off may not require a lot of skill, but if don’t know what you are doing you can make it more difficult than what it needs to be.

The man told me a long time ago that if its hard you must be doing it wrong.[/quote]

Me thinks 5 layer tear offs are hard.


#8

my favorite method of tearing off any roof is temp service guys the great thing about it is you get new ones every day, because they always quite about half way through the day. There are machines out that work as long as it is a 5/12 or under your supplier should be able to hook you up. Seriously I tell all my guys including foreman if you are to proud to tear-off then find a new job. We have also found the invention of yard magnets helpful.


#9

Yard magnets?
That does sound like a cool invention.
I’ll have to check that out.


#10

Me thinks 5 layer tear offs are hard.

I don’t know, I think its easier than tearing a single layer off 5 house.


#11

Roof-Lover, I assume when he said yard magnets he is talking about the magnet that is on two small wheels that is about 3 feet wide. All you do is roll it around and it should pick up any magnetic nails. I do not know if you were joking or not but I assume that is what he meant…


#12

First the Home is a 12/12 Older Victorian , in Great Condition . It had a Complete Tear Off Yrs. ago.
Plywood Looks Good . So It’s 1 Layer T-Locks and 15 lb. Felt. Home is assessable on - Two Sides for Dumpster & Lift .

Plywood Installed , and there is Metal in the Valley’s already the Two Velux Skylights - have the Heavy Gauge -E-Coat - Flashing and the - Large Chimney has a Super Flashing Job - I Inspected all Area’s and NO LEAKS .

First I Like to Start with Valley’s - This Roof is Way to much for Me to do , I’m to Old for this Stuff. - The New Methods seem to favor Closed Valleys vs Open Valleys ?

Second Item - I’d like to get a under Layment for the Shingles - like Grace , but would Prefer One that - Help Keep the Attic Cool .

Tearing It Off in the - Valley Area ?
Tearing It Off - Around the Chimney Area ?

Thanks
I’m a Tech. Guy so all the Details , Please :slight_smile:


#13

[quote=“EngTech1”]First the Home is a 12/12 Older Victorian , in Great Condition . It had a Complete Tear Off Yrs. ago.
Plywood Looks Good . So It’s 1 Layer T-Locks and 15 lb. Felt. Home is assessable on - Two Sides for Dumpster & Lift .

Plywood Installed , and there is Metal in the Valley’s already the Two Velux Skylights - have the Heavy Gauge -E-Coat - Flashing and the - Large Chimney has a Super Flashing Job - I Inspected all Area’s and NO LEAKS .

First I Like to Start with Valley’s - This Roof is Way to much for Me to do , I’m to Old for this Stuff. - The New Methods seem to favor Closed Valleys vs Open Valleys ?

Second Item - I’d like to get a under Layment for the Shingles - like Grace , but would Prefer One that - Help Keep the Attic Cool .

Tearing It Off in the - Valley Area ?
Tearing It Off - Around the Chimney Area ?

Thanks
I’m a Tech. Guy so all the Details , Please :)[/quote]

I like a 20 inch 26 gauge roll valley for the valleys. First I run 36 inches of Certainteed Weatherguard and Certainteed Roofer Sellect 15 pound weaved in the valleys before the roll valley is put in place. You can do open valleys too but either do factory painted or better yet go copper.

When you draw a mental picture of your roof I picture a Certainteed Carriage House, Centential Slate, or Grand Manor (in order of expensive to really expensive). With copper flashing of course.

As far as tearing off in the valleys and around the chimnneys. The valley metal will need to be removed. The chimney flashing could be re-used but I like to replace it.

If I did your roof I would first set up tarps drapped along the siding and then put roof jacks and 2x6’s at the eaves around the entire perimeter. Plywood to protect first level doors and window, a/c units, ponds, etc. For plants you have to get creative with 12/12’s to protect them. I like using large totes or 5 gallon buckets. The trick on hot days is to quickly do what you gotta do to ensure that you don’t suffocate the plant. Some home owners really like plants. My wife loves plants and know what she goes through when they die.


#14

Great posts guys.

Temp workers and magna-sweepers can definitely make this task go smoother.

I believe that low-pitch machine is called “shingles peelerâ€Â


#15

Dude if the Chimney is A-OK , Leave It the ^%$$^%^ alone ( dougger222 ) . Inspect It If it’s High and Dry all around the Chimney - don’t Go There Your Insurance Company will Love You for It !

LOL , as Most Roofing Contractors will be the First to Say - Hey I’m not a Mason !


#16

[quote=“EngTech1”]Dude if the Chimney is A-OK , Leave It the ^%$$^%^ alone ( dougger222 ) . Inspect It If it’s High and Dry all around the Chimney - don’t Go There Your Insurance Company will Love You for It !

LOL , as Most Roofing Contractors will be the First to Say - Hey I’m not a Mason ![/quote]

Most “high grade” roofers will never re-use flashing.
As a matter of fact in order to get a 5 Star Certainteed warranty ALL FLASHING MUST BE REPLACED. That would include step flashing, kick out flashing, skylight flashing, valley flashing, dormer flashing and of course chimney flashing.

Of the many hundred tear offs I’ve done in the past half dozen years I can’t recall ever re-using chimney flashing. Of course 95% of my tear offs are insurance jobs and they pay for replacing all flashing 95% of the time and 100% of the time on chimneys.

Are you a roofing contractor???


#17

I just bid on a roof last week for a home owner who’s getting a loan from the county to replace her roof amoung a bunch of other things.

A couple details of interest were,
All flashing must be replaced
Yard must be manget swept when complete
Valleys must be open cut

The city will inspect the roof then the county will inspect the roof.

Upon inspection of her roof I found none of the step flashing nailed to the roof. The siding is the old masonite garbage and will not be replaced. Four kick out diverters need to be installed to pass the city inspection.

Got three magnet sweeps one in each work vehicle. Not the cheap ones either the $130 ones that have the magnet release.


#18

Alright Kick It Up a Notch , I have $300.00 in Copper Flashing On a $10,000 Dollar Chimney Rebuild all Tucked and Button Down 10 Yrs.

It has Been Water Proof - Not even Condensation -NO
Sweating -either so , excellent - Newer Masonry !

Your Going to Rip - That Out ?

I could see some Older Crap that’s not Flashed Properly or was done in - Alu. .


#19

[quote=“EngTech1”]Alright Kick It Up a Notch , I have $300.00 in Copper Flashing On a $10,000 Dollar Chimney Rebuild all Tucked and Button Down 10 Yrs.

It has Been Water Proof - Not even Condensation -NO
Sweating -either so , excellent - Newer Masonry !

Your Going to Rip - That Out ?

I could see some Older Crap that’s not Flashed Properly or was done in - Alu. .[/quote]

IF the flashing got bent or torn in the process of replacing the step flashing then absolutely would it need to be replaced. That is of course IF the step flashing would be replaced.

BTW, you got a killer deal on that chimney rebuild.

Oh, and IF the roof were to get a five star warranty (via Certainteed) than oh ya the “copper” flashing would also have to be replaced. What would say $300 be on say a $30K roof? Not much… That being said $300 to copper flash a 52 inch chimney would be a killer deal. I get $350 to flash smaller chimneys with factory baked paint on counter/riglet, dormer, and step flashing.

So to answer your question YES I would rip that out…


#20

If a Little Care was Taken on a One Layer Peel
Nothing would get Damaged .
That’s Like If Care Isn’t taken on Flashing around
a Cedar Skirt then the Entire Peak would have to be Re shingled in Cedar - to Clear Out the 18" of
Flashing and Cedar Shingles - that would be Damaged during Your Tear-Off - I Suppose the Owner would Shoot You on the Spot .
Well Maybe wait till You Had Breakfast at the Local Dinner .

Flashing that is Designed to Last 50 yrs. Better just do Just That !

Your Insurance Company Is going to Love Your
Workmanship Claims. As Home Owners are Video Taping and Now Use Wireless Camera’s to Watch what’s Going On !

Book _Hmm - Dan-O