Wrong color roof installed!


#21

Bad News:

Suing the roofer - The roofer doesn’t make the shingles, If you told him that you want a black shingle and he installed a white shingle…then it would be a different story. It sounds like he did what he promised to do. What exactly does his contract say, and what does the fine print with the shingle company say.

Suing the manufacturer - google Certainteed New Horizon’s - the shingles cracked / fell apart sometimes as early as 8yrs. old. Some people only recieved a few hundred dollars back because the problem was said to be “cosmetic”. It didn’t leak. So, it would be highly unlikely that certainteed would pay to remove and replace your roof because you don’t like the color.

The challenges with picking a shingle color for your roofing project.
This goes for all customers / contractors…
A lot of variables.
-Small samples
-Samples are viewed as close as a few ft. away
-If the roofer put the sample board on the roof while you stood on the ground
…it would look to small to even make a decision
-Brochures - the pictures never look exactly how the roof looks in real life
-Sun - The roof looks totally different when it has the sun shining at different angles / what time of the day
-Weather - the color looks way different when they are wet or damp
-Existing homes with the same color shingle - they usually have different color siding /
shudders / etc. Unless it is the same exact house, but still shingle color fades once installed,
and what’s in the background. Trees/forest vs. a home with no tree’s and just blue sky. Does
the home sit 200yds away from the rd. vs. a home that is 30 yds.

  • Roof Pitch / Angle - A shingle installed on a 4/12 roof looks completely different vs. the same
    shingle installed on a 12/12.
    -Opinions - what some people call gray, others see it as brown. I call my truck brown, but
    some of the workers call it gray, some say it’s tan. Who is wrong and who is right? Manufacturer
    may call it almond.
  • Architectural shingles - they have a dimensional / 3d look. Even a architectural shingle that has only
    one granule color (none that I know of, there is always 2 or more)…will look different because of the shading dimensional effect.
    Manufacture color match- one may love the color that the neighbor got on there home 6 yrs ago but that same color and brand may have changed the pattern/granule color blend. This is mentioned in the warranty fine print.
  • Location - shingle manufacturer’s have multiple factories across America etc. A sample board that
    was made from shingles in Pennsylvania, may look a little different vs. the one made in a factory that’s a state or two away.
    -Age of sample boards/ Is the sample board brand new or has it been dropped a bunch of times, dropped in the mud and cleaned off, coffee spilled on it etc.
    Emotions- how did the overall project go. If you feel the contractor did a horrible job as far as crushing the flowers,
    Putting the dumpster in the grass, caused a flat tire from nails laying around etc. I would feel a different set of emotions when looking at the finished product/color vs. looking at the finished roof from a contractor that operated a smooth operation and didn’t cause any headaches for me. I would be looking and expecting something wrong vs. excited to admire the finished product of the professionals I chose to work on my home.
    -Faulty sample board - I am sure it is 1 in a million, but somewhere a sample board was made with
    the wrong color labels.
    -area of the home - was the sample set up against the siding that gets a lot of shade or the siding
    that is faded on one side of the house.
  • Camera’s - even if you post a few pictures…it would be hard to tell because different camera’s / exposures can make a picture look way different vs. real life.
    When did you first see the shingles installed on the roof. Did they finish in a day or did you see them
    after they installed 1/4 to 1/2 of the roof. What did you think at that time / or what did you say to the contractor.

We could go on and on, but at this point I don’t think anybody is going to give you the answer
that you want and maybe deserve. If the contractor decided to get a lawyer to defend himself in court…the lawyer would bring up all of these points and probably even a lot more.

If you sue the manufacturer, that’s about impossible to win. I imagine they have a few full time lawyers on the staff. I imagine you aren’t the only person that this has happened to or feel the way that you do about the finished product.

Unfortunately you don’t have a lot of options. Is it worth it to pay to have it removed and another color installed, or is it something that you can get used to and are more upset about the situation and how you feel that you have been treated? Do you plan on moving in the next few years… or do you plan on living in that home for the remainder of your life here on earth. I say that because I see people with houses painted pink, so someone may absolutely love how your color looks and may purchase the home because of that.

It is a horrible situation, because a roof is a huge investment and it’s not as fun as buying a new vehicle, but you expect some joy from the large investment. I’m not sure what option is best for you but I think a lawsuit would eat up a lot of time and money with very minimal chance of winning. I wish you the best with whatever you decide to do and check back in and write a post about the final result with this dilemma.

Sincerely,

Onarooftop


#22

> It sounds like he did what he promised to do.

Thank you for the thorough and thoughtful post, but I think this sums it up, and we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

I think that showing me brown, then installing gray, especially with no warning of a possibly gray outcome, after meeting three times and spending hours to state exactly what I want, is wrong.

gallery/daventry-a496/brownvsgray-i1865.jpg


#23

[quote=“Daventry”]> It sounds like he did what he promised to do.

Thank you for the thorough and thoughtful post, but I think this sums it up, and we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

I think that showing me brown, then installing gray, especially with no warning of a possibly gray outcome, after meeting three times and spending hours to state exactly what I want, is wrong.

gallery/daventry-a496/brownvsgray-i1865.jpg[/quote]

Can you post a picture of your new roof?


#24

If you signed a contract that had " Install the brand Certainteed in the color weathered wood" on it and that’s what they did, then they are not in breach of the contract.

If said contract had "payment is due upon completion written on it, the work has been done but has not been paid for yet, then you are in breach of contract!

If said case goes to court you may very well end up paying the full contract amount, the defendant’s attorneys fees, court costs, filing fees, late charges and possibly lost wages.

Probably won’t be much fun getting the lien taken off your property either.


#25

I did a job years ago where the lady went INTO the supplier and chose a black 3-tab for her roof. A couple days later she comes to the jobsite where I had about 6 sq on. She yelled and screamed from the ground that I was installing the wrong colour. I grabbed a bundle wrapper and went down to talk to her. That’s when SHE realized she made a mistake by looking at the shingle INSIDE under interior lighting. When the same shingle was outside in the sun, it had a sparkle to it that she hated. She agreed to pay for tearing off, unloading and reloading the roof because she realized SHE made the mistake.


#26

[quote=“LuckyChucky”]If you signed a contract that had " Install the brand Certainteed in the color weathered wood" on it and that’s what they did, then they are not in breach of the contract.

If said contract had "payment is due upon completion written on it, the work has been done but has not been paid for yet, then you are in breach of contract!

If said case goes to court you may very well end up paying the full contract amount, the defendant’s attorneys fees, court costs, filing fees, late charges and possibly lost wages.

Probably won’t be much fun getting the lien taken off your property either.[/quote]

In all likelihood, what LC said. This sounds a bit like two ugly people having an ugly baby and blaming the obstetrician.


#27

I really don’t think “It sounds like he did what he promised to do” summed up my post, but
anyhow what your saying isn’t 100% making sense.

Your words - "After much research on roofing companies in my area and on shingle manufacturers, I hired a company to install CertainTeed Landmark in Weathered Wood. (they installed landmark weathered wood, right?) It would be a different story if you said install brown shingles, and on your contract it said brown shingles, and he/she installed fox hollow gray shingles.

I think that showing me brown, then installing gray, especially with no warning of a possibly gray outcome, after meeting three times and spending hours to state exactly what I want, is wrong.
(he met with you 3 times and spent hrs. with you to decide on a color)? That doesn’t sound like a contractor that’s trying to pull a fast one.

Sounds like he did what he promised to do. That leaves the manufacturer. I would say if all you say
is true…Certainteed should be the one to be mad at…
Your not answering half the questions that some have asked so I am
curious why you decided to come here to post.
1 - to vent your frustration (ok yeah, I understand that)
2 - attempt to get contractors to side with you and use that in court against him/her.
(I don’t see that happening. Not with this situation, He did what he promised to do).
Question: Did you pay him? Because if you haven’t then technically you are the only
one that isn’t doing what you promised. What was on the contract.
3 - advice on what options you realistically have going forward.

My previousl post was directed towards number 1 and number 3.


#28

The picture of the two samples look way off. The cut and angle of the laminated sections makes me think they are both CT Landmark shingles. The top shingle looks more like Georgetown Gray than Weathered Wood.

We do a lot of Landmark Weathered Woods roofs and they have quite a bit of brown in them. From region to region the shingle names and colors change.

Several years ago did a job with my Uncle for a builder. We had the roof mostly shingled when the homeowner showed up and voiced his opinion about the new roof. He said it didn’t look anything like the brochure he looked at. The shingle he picked out was CT Landmark Pewter. The builder showed up with my Uncle and the homeowner to compare the shingle to the sample board. The sample board and shingle looked way off although they were both named Landmark Pewter. I looked at the date of the sample board and said it was 6 years old! The builder looked at me and didn’t seem very happy! It’s been a lot of years but thinking may have been 16 years old at the time! The builder paid for the new roof on the new house.

We had two builders mess on shingles and both had to be replaced.

A couple years ago got a bunch of sample boards from a supply house. Before taking them to the customers always look them over to make sure they look decent. To my amazement found one that was labeled the wrong color! Called the manufacturer rep and he picked it up. This mistake could have cost the manufacturer A LOT of money! Of course the samples are third party to my knowledge.

In the case of the OP going to have to side with them on this one, the two shingles look quite off…


#29

Hate to say it but those 2 shingles you posted are the same color. You can have that much variation in a single bundle. Both of those are landmark weathered wood which is a grey ish brown. At least that’s how I always describe it… Add in things like lighting, was it cloudy the day you looked at the sample, did you hold the sample at an angle equal to your roofs pitch, etc? All of these things affect the look once its finally on your roof. Neither the roofer nor CT appear to be in the wrong here in my opinion.


#30

certainteeds weathered wood is a grey and brown mix.
brown highlights.
it will look more grey-ish or brown-ish depending on pitch and siding.
its a true chameleon color.

The only true brown is the burnt sienna.
And she probably would think that’s too brown…and unacceptable
sigh…

need pics with the sun behind your back!!
maybe you can get some support! :slight_smile:


#31

I think Daventry is right…
I don’t think that top shingle is indeed weatherwood.
Maybe bad labeling mistake at the plant?
the bottem shingle is indeed weatherwood.
I believe the top shingle to be driftwood…


#32

You did mention:
manufacturer took a sample from the roof and says it’s within specifications

…So the contractor installed the Weathered Wood shingle that you agreed upon verbally.
So hopefully you paid him in full or he would actually have a case against you.

What does it say on your contract. Weathered Wood or light/dark brown?
Do you feel the shingle manufacturer is lying?


#33

I just had a roof installed this week, may 2018.
I picked 'Nickel Grey" Certainteed. It is installed and looks exactly like “black Pepper”. The roofer did nothing wrong, the packages are labeled “nickel Grey”. Its outrageously different. I am totally bummed but can’t for the life of me figure out what I can do. I have screen shots of the colors on the web, even the one where I put the color on the house…All the “Nickel Grey” Images look dary grey, closer to the black end of the scale.
What is on my roof is very light.
Does anyone have any advice for me? How can I get Certainteed to deal?


#34

You can contact certainteed and request a rep look at your roof. But I imagine you have about a 1% chance of them doing anything about it. The thing is shingle colors can actually look quite different when installed on different houses. If you install gray shingles on a white house, but then install those same shingles on the black house next door with a different pitch they will look much different.


#35

I’m too busy to find it ATM but the manufacturers all have a disclaimer stating to look at some full size samples, not just pics or the small square in the sample book before making a final decision.