Will new shingles be damaged if walked on in heat?


#1

Hello - this forum was very helpful as I researched our roofing project earlier this year!

Now we have a beautiful new shingle roof (Pabco Premiere 30-yr), about one month old. Unfortunately we have to have some window work done now, which will require those workers to get up on the roof and wrestle with windows (the back side of the house has a 4’ shingled eave under the windows, which all need to be replaced).

HERE’S THE QUESTION: the temp is going to be in the 80s when the window guys are here (yes, even in Seattle), and I’m concerned about the window guys damaging the new shingles. Is this a legitimate concern?

(When the roofers put on the new roof, we also had a couple of 80 degree days, and they had to hose down the shingles to keep them cool. They said in hot weather they had to take extra care not to scuff the shingles as they worked. We have a 12:12 pitch, 3-stories high on the back side, so it’s not easy for roofers or window guys or anyone to work on this thing.)

Appreciate your help!
(And I can also call Pabco directly, since they’re local)

Thanks!
Angela

By the way, we would have done the windows first, but the roofers moved us WAY up on the schedule and we jumped at the chance to get the roof done first. Oh well.)


#2

Hi,

Yes scuffing the shingles is a real concern.

Most trades have no respect for the roof. So watch out for the window guys. When they come take a picture of the roof before they start. Let the window contractor know of your concern asap.


#3

If it’s 12/12 they won’t be walking on it.


#4

No, they’ll be sliding down it! :wink: That’s why I’m worried. It’s a really hard working situation (and was for the roofers too – but at least they cared about keeping it looking good!)


#5

if they twist on them alot you’ll get them scuffed to death. you should be ok in the 80 degree weather from the melting of the tar on the shingles. but if its 90-100 degrees forget it as any walking on it will destroy the shingles


#6

No, they’ll be sliding down it! :wink: That’s why I’m worried. It’s a really hard working situation (and was for the roofers too – but at least they cared about keeping it looking good!)


#7

ha, sounds like someone could use a couple sets of roof brackets and a walk board?
Keep ya off shingles on a steep pitch! Gotta Use Brackets And Boards on steep slope anyway!


#8

yeah if ya have a steep roof your gonna tear the shingles up tryin to work off of them,
even with toe boards

i would make window installers biuld a 2x4/plywood
work surface that would lay over the shingls and protect them at the same time give good footing to
the window dudes.

eya

gweedo


#9

[quote=“gweedo”]yeah if ya have a steep roof your gonna tear the shingles up tryin to work off of them,
even with toe boards

i would make window installers biuld a 2x4/plywood
work surface that would lay over the shingls and protect them at the same time give good footing to
the window dudes.

eya

gweedo[/quote]

The sad part is, you know they’ll probably use toe-boards, and they will nail them down through the shingles. When it is time to leave, they’ll probably just dab a little caulk over the nail holes in the shingles.


#10

I would not get in a panic about it. Make your concerns known to the window crew and treat them good (ie. put water or soda out). Take pictures both of the roof before they get there and take some while they are installing the windows. Those guys do their job everyday, I’m fairly sure they know how to not scar a roof. If you act nice but a little nervous and make your concerns known to both the owner and the foreman they will be extra careful.


#11

What about having the roofer come back out & installing / removing the toe boards? A cost, to be sure, however you can rest assured that they’ll take better care with this end of it.

You can also get egg crating & / or thicker couch cushion foam to have the window guys work over. It tends to move a lot easier than a piece of plywood.

If you’ve got a painting crew that will be in the same area, you might want them in & out before removing the toe boards. Same goes for… um… a weather vane technician, lightning rod installer, a weather station specialist & maybe Snoopy if he’s got a scheduled mission vs. the Red Baron that day.


#12

[quote=“RanchHandRoofing”]What about having the roofer come back out & installing / removing the toe boards? A cost, to be sure, however you can rest assured that they’ll take better care with this end of it.

You can also get egg crating & / or thicker couch cushion foam to have the window guys work over. It tends to move a lot easier than a piece of plywood.

If you’ve got a painting crew that will be in the same area, you might want them in & out before removing the toe boards. Same goes for… um… a weather vane technician, lightning rod installer, a weather station specialist & maybe Snoopy if he’s got a scheduled mission vs. the Red Baron that day.[/quote]

That’s a good idea about leaving some boards for the window guys. Did a lot of new roofs and while taking out the boards thought how nice it would be for the siders to use them but more then likely they wouldn’t take them out and I’d have to go back out for free to take them out. On a couple steep jobs 3 stories up left on the bottom boards for the siders who took them out of course.

Got a call a couple years ago from a builder who said the new house was leaking. Sider just finished and he was out and said it wasn’t his fault. I got up on the roof and counted about 30 16 penny nail holes in the roof. Called the builder and told him what I found and guess who did the caulking for free? Me. Since I was there and it was raining.

My father tells the story best about the builder who called him and asked if he could come over and try to help figure out why his new roof was leaking. The roofer pulled out all the 2x4’s and didn’t caulk one hole! Sitting in the attic looking out in the day you could see holes every were.

A siding crew for a builder used to not only dab an inch of silicone under every tab on 15 jobs but on three jobs they tore up the shingles so bad on the front porch roofs that it looked like they had on cleats and stood and twisted there feet all over the roof. On one job I had to spud out 3sq’s of gray shingles that had turned black by the siders feet.

Scuffing is a huge problem and it seems worse with the laminate shingles. For some reason most laminate roofs seem to be hotter than organic roofs.


#13

Thanks everyone for your replies. The windows are in and the roof is fine. I did express my concerns about heat and scuffing to the owner of the window co, and the 2-man crew who worked here for the 2 days was very careful and worked deliberately and carefully. They did all the high work with just ladders, and worked their way around the house either ahead of or behind the sun to avoid having the shingles really heated up.
All things considered, I would definitely prefer to try to do all of the work together in one timeframe as some of you have suggested – leaving up jacks/walkboards for windows, painting, etc. But it was hard enough logistically (and financially) to get just the roof and windows done and we won’t even be able to afford the repainting until next year. So at that point perhaps I will have the roof guys come over and put up walkboards for the painters.
Anyhow, thanks again for your replies.
Angela