Where to begin your first row on a hip roof?


#1

I have a 4/12 hip roof with one valley. I have been told to start the first row of shingles in the middle:

Find the middle top and bottom chaulk verticle line(check with the gutter edge to make sure the line is at a right angle to the gutter edge. Use the 3-4-5 or multiple of, example if the base is 3 the height is 4 the long side of the triangle has to be 5. 6-8-10,12-16-20 etc.

This way the shingles will be parallel with the gutter edge. Start nailing from this line in both directions then cut at the hip.

I will be using Timberline Prestique 30 year shingle. Any tips on keeping them straight as you install them? Should I chalk line each row?
Thanks,
Pat


#2

With that shingle you do not need to snap vertical lines.

I would snap horizontal lines and start at the valley. You can start at either end it doesn’t matter too much, it is a matter of preference.
Just follow the instructions on the package, it is fairly straight forward, basic shingling.

For lines, I use 18" for the first line then the rest are spaced 22 1/4" apart.
There are other equally good methods, this one works for me.

For your valley, the roof with the greatest area of run off is the cut side.
If you have 2 different pitches involved it is up to your discretion.
Cut your ears/points and tar down your valley like the instructions say, keep the shingle joints 12" away from the valley on both the cut side and the side that you run onto the plane of the other roof, measuring from the bottom of the shingle.


#3

[quote="-Axiom-"]

For lines, I use 18" for the first line then the rest are spaced 22 1/4" apart.
There are other equally good methods, this one works for me.

For your valley, the roof with the greatest area of run off is the cut side.
If you have 2 different pitches involved it is up to your discretion.
Cut your ears/points and tar down your valley like the instructions say, keep the shingle joints 12" away from the valley on both the cut side and the side that you run onto the plane of the other roof, measuring from the bottom of the shingle.[/quote]

Axiom, I’m not following you on your explanation for lines. Sorry, first time roofer here.

On the valley, I will be putting down the weather seal and would like to do a California closed cut valley. I’ve been looking through the other posts here to figure out how to do it. the greatest run off side is the cut off side…does that mean that side is the side you want overlapping in the valley then cutting the edge? So on my roof, I would lay down the smaller side first, overlapping the valley. Then shingle over from my garage…the larger surface area and cut the shingle in the center and asphalt cement the ends where I cut? Here’s a pic of the valley:

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/6937/img_1223155739.jpg


#4

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/6937/img_1223158147.jpg

Does this help?

The exposed metal you see at the eave edge is a gutter helmet, not drip edge.


#5

Yes… roof over your living space, then the little 4’ part, then the garage.

Pay very close attention to your chimney flashing. If you ever have a leak i would bet chances are 99% it would leak there for a rookie.


#6

When you get to the hip ridge, do you overlap the shingles at the ridge too? or do you cut them at the ridge then place the ridge cap shingle?


#7

Certainteed says to run the Landmarks from left to right.


#8

-Axiom- says start at the valley.
This way you have more control over how close the stagger (joints) is to the valley.


#9

[quote="-Axiom-"]-Axiom- says start at the valley.
This way you have more control over how close the stagger (joints) is to the valley.[/quote]

Dougger says,

“That looks like some real cheap felt paper”.

Certaintly aint no Roofer Sellect…

Sorry,

I hear you but today had to run some cheap felt for a cheap builder. The pics look like some real cheap felt. Great shingles good method, horrible underlayment.

Every roof sold in the past 3+ years have had Winterguard, Roofer Sellect, and Certainteed starters.


#10

15# is crud, but it is what commoners use.

Please look at the diagrams on the bundle wrappers for a visual of how to install them and how much of a cut off each shingle needs.

Ed


#11

With the prices the way they are today,I cant blame anyone for the cheap felt thing…I still can’t bring myself to use anything but shingle mate…38.50 per 4 sq. now…#15 gen. felt 25.00 did someone say cheap?..when #15 felt was 9.00 shingle mate was 25.00


#12

That is 30# felt, it costs more than Roofer Select…
Roofer Select has holes in it so I don’t use it on existing buildings.

I don’t particularly like that 30# either, as you can see it bubbles up when it gets wet…
It does stand up to wind well and provides good footing.
Most importantly, there are no holes in it.
It doesn’t always lay out flat and straight.
I have asked my supplier to provide Certainteed 30# but they just won’t…


#13

excellent picture demonstrating how to do a closed valley.

We all do things different. The only thing i would have done different is i wouldn’t have brought all my shingles so far to the other side of that valley.
That roofer likes to bring his shingles a lil farther than the halfway center point of the valley.
I bring mine a lil shorter than the halfway point of the valley.

We do the same thing on the popping of lines.

PB, you said you didn’t understand what axiom meant with the lines. Look at his picture and you will see blue chalk lines popped on the felt in line with how the shingles go.

Axiom uses the first line measurement of 18 inches
up from the very bottom part of the roof.

I would do this too if i wasn’t using evedrip metal.
I use evedrip around the entire perimeter of every shingle structure i do.
So i start my first line measurement at 19 inches.
Axiom pops each new line up at every 22 1/4 inches.
I make mine at 22 1/8.
The crew if i am not there, will pop 22 inches even.

According to “manufacture specs” lol 22 1/4 would be the measurement. But i find that there are too many exposed nails at that measurement. Because
I am a stickler for “NO HIGH NAILING”

I would rather have exposed nails(low nails), that i can fix and hide rather than the roof all being
"high nailed" = not nailed every time through the double thickness of the shingle)
and the roof leaks or blows off or falls out.

i dont care how many low nails there are.
No high nails.

And i tell my crew not to fix their low nails.
I fix every low nail on the job personally.
I make it look nice.

Other roofers(most) will argue with me
and they will tell you they dont have any low nails on their jobs. But the truth is, all their jobs are high nailed and crap in my opinion.

And i can run a hitachi/bostitch roofing gun like you have NEVER seen in your life. Fast and perfection.

The nails are in the double thickness of the shingle and flush.
If i shoot high(rare), i stop and put roofing cement over the nail area that i thought shot too deep. I am not afraid to get my finger dirty.
I keep some roofing cement on a spare shingle piece next to me at all times while i shingle.
Only one man have i seen besides me that does that
and i trained that man.


#14

Oh yeah. If it is available in your region, All yall need to try Atlas D226 underlayment 15 or 30 pound. Its gonna blow your minds. Its just a massive roll of goodness.
Atlas “weathermaster” peel n seal ice and water shield is great too.

I do not like the Atlas 3 tabs.
I do not like the Atlas charcoal architect.
But their other architect colors are a real nice color with a deep shadow line that really looks good on the roof.


#15

Thanks for the explanation Roof lover. That helps. I will strip the whole roof, make a roof ridge vent hole then I plan to put down weather watch around entire perimeter and in the valley and around the chimney and plumbing. I have the starter strip and using Z-ridge cap. Color: Barkwood.

The underlayment I bought is called Rex Synfelt. Anyone use this product?

Hopefully all goes well. I will post up some pics of my progress and you all can beat me up on my novice shingling! :slight_smile:


#16

[quote="-Axiom-"]That is 30# felt, it costs more than Roofer Select…
Roofer Select has holes in it so I don’t use it on existing buildings.

I don’t particularly like that 30# either, as you can see it bubbles up when it gets wet…
It does stand up to wind well and provides good footing.
Most importantly, there are no holes in it.
It doesn’t always lay out flat and straight.
I have asked my supplier to provide Certainteed 30# but they just won’t…[/quote]

Never found any holes in the Roofer Sellect felt. The rep at one of the distributors I go through said he cannot get his hands on any Certainteed 30 pound felt. One of the large shingle houses in MN (4 locations) has not had Roofer Sellect in months. I have had no problem getting my hands on the Roofer Sellect at a cost of $44 per roll.

30# does get way to wrinkly. I saw the wrinkles and figured it was the cheap stuff. Heck if you spit on it you will get a wrinkle!


#17

What is the proper procedure for this?
Thanks, DaveB