What type of valley would you all say this is?


#1

I was looking at RooferJ’s website and saw this valley: home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 5488Lumlhc
My roofer just did this with my valley, and was wondering why they run the row of shingles 1 inch off the valley all the way up? Is this a good practice?


#2

YES ! . Its called around here a “Tamko vally” thats because Tamko started it with having it on the bundle wrappers of there Heritage laminate shingle line. Of course it also works on other brands of laminates and has recently been approved by GAF. I have vallys that are almost 20 years old this way. Yes at first I was a bit skeptical but it is fine and eliminates the need for cutting in the vally and looks just like a close cut from the ground.

RooferJim
ps
Thanks for checking out my site, I have a lot more pics im meaning to upload soon many of them very strange,unusual and artistic roof scenes.and some slightly insane.


#3

Thanks RooferJ, I knew you thought it would be a good idea =) I really like the pictures of your work and sure you do a good job… could you please answer what the purpose is? I saw a video on GAF’s webside of the closed cut valley, and they simply cut the shingle up the chalk line. From what I saw our roofer do, he ran the chalk line, put down cement, layed the line of shingles and nailed it down, then essentially lined up the corner of the single with the edge of the shingles running along the valley. This appears also what you did… Thanks for your help… roofing is pretty interesting.


#4

This is an explanation of how to do the valley shingles in that manner and the benefit of doing so that I posted in another forum, called JLC about a year ago.

I read it on the Tamko Heritage Bundle quite a few years ago too.

Ed

"Depending on the brand and the manufacturers allowable specifications, many architectural shingles allow for a valley construction which not only eliminates the cutting, but also saves on materials.

Pay attention part time roofers, this is a big time and material saver.

  1. Run you lower side of the valley shingles across the valley as you normally would.

  2. Run a full course of the architectural shingle perpendicular to the valley an the higher water shedding side of the valley. Yes, they get applied on exactly the same angle as the actual valley itself.

  3. When running your horizontal rows across the higher side of the valley, do not have them go any farther the the bottom edge of the previously applied course of shingles that you just ran perpindicular to the valley. Only the bottom corner of the horizontal row will abutt the bottom edge of the course running perpindicular to the valley.

  4. Continue all successive horizontal courses in the same fashion. The top corner portion of the shingle that did not make it all the way to the valley does not leave a visible open area. The course that has already been run up perpindicular to the valley has its bottom intended exposed portion covering this area.

A) Now, there will be no angled cutting required.

B) Assuming 27 shingles per bundle at a 5" exposure per course, you will have saved one full bundle of architectural shingles for every 11’ 3" of valley length.

C) You determine how much labor time was saved by utilizing this method.

Hey! I guess this is the “Easy” button method mentioned earlier.

P.S. Read the manufacturers instructions on the bundle wrapper to see if it is allowable on the brand of shingles you are using. It probably is, but I primarily deal with Tamko Heritage and Certainteed Landmark shingles."


#5

…was wondering why they run the row of shingles 1 inch off the valley all the way up? Is this a good practice?

We are going to have to agree to disagree here guys beause I think that type of cut is lazy and while it may look the same as a closed cut valley two stories up on a 6/12 it certainly won’t look the same 10-15’ over the front door.

I could see doing that kind of valley if your knife fell in quicksand maybe…

I have more respect for Jim and Ed than any other two roofers on this forum but I’d never run a valley like that.


#6

[quote=“Tar Monkey”]…was wondering why they run the row of shingles 1 inch off the valley all the way up? Is this a good practice?

We are going to have to agree to disagree here guys beause I think that type of cut is lazy and while it may look the same as a closed cut valley two stories up on a 6/2 it certainly won’t look the same 10-15’ over the front door.

I could see doing that kind of valley if your knife fell in quicksand maybe…

I have more respect for Jim and Ed than any other two roofers on this forum but I’d never run a valley like that.[/quote]

I agree with Tar Monkey.
We call them California valleys here, IMO it is a cheat.


#7

After having installed thousands of vallys this way, I see no logical reason to be against them. A Tamko vally isn’t only extremely fast to install,and saves material, but it is also as straight as an arrow. I can say that I have seen many more problems with closed cut vallys where some sloppy installer inadvertanly cut thru the lower shingle or just couldn’t cut straight and made it look like a hachet job. If we do install a cut vally we recommend using snips. I was a skeptic at first way back when then I talked with my Tamko rep and we were hooked.


#8

I have seen it and installed this type before. I like the closed cut myself(one cut).


#9

Hi,

The only problem with the California valley is that after a 6 pitch the joints are to close together.

You have to cut the down shingles.


#10

Yeah I agree with tar monkey too. We call them california valleys here in wisconsin because we are pretty sure they should only be done in california where they get no snow. The problem is that when we have drifts of snow, they all settle in the valleys and over time delaminate and crack the shingle a lot faster then if you just put in a regular metal valley. Im sure they work fine where you live but thats why I dont do them around here.

I did do one once on a side job though because thats how I was told to do it, It did save time but I am not a big fan of, seems like its sort of the easy way out.

Take Care.


#11

We do those half laps all the time, as a matter of fact my brother got mad at me today, because he wanted to do 3 tabs like that.
I told him we would have to cut them, because of the waterlines.


#12

Three tabs wont work that way. We get plenty of snow and ice in Massachusetts and I can tell you that Tamko vallys dont have any problems “at least ours dont”


#13

rooferj,
well,
i think someone in cali smoked a big phaty
and came up with said application.

i know it works. i have freinds that do it.
run the valleys like that.
i however do not.
when you add that 3rd layer of single in the valley
it makes nailing it impossible.
also the steeper the roof the less stagger goin up the valley when done so.
you really have to stagger , vertically , demensional shingles at least 6 "s. alot of moisture gets in at the sides of demensionals and runs a little from side to side, unlike 3 tabs that have water keyways to shed the water (i get the feeling your were waundering about that).

i typed alot rite there.

i also was very entertained by fellow members replys.

quicksand from monkey, a classic.

monkey make gweedo laugh
gweedo like monkey.

gweedo.