What do you make of this? (slope to masonry joint)


#1

Additionally, check out this ridge vent installation:

This drawing shows where these two are located:

[size=150]Anyhow[/size], back to the ‘original’ question:

What are my chances that the flashing is going fully up & under the brick for this chimney? My concern here is that if I break the mortar joint that I’m not going to get a good seal back in there & it should have been a ‘proper’ reglet, point or counterflashed job.

Thoughts?

This is an insurance job, Farmer’s, & I have had decent success with both USAA & AllState in getting them to compensate for these additional ‘code required’ parts. I say this because I’ve done OK even if it was code @ the time of construction vs. a roof that was done, say 15+ years ago & only now are the ‘improvements’ or design changes required.

I’m also concerned about the apron, or ‘down slope’ / base portion of this chimney where there’s no metal laying OVER the top of the shingles as it comes out from under the chimney.


#2

Hi,

I would be more concerned about the back of the chimney.

If the front is sealed in any fashion it will not leak.


#3

Lefty, the upside / high side is under 30" & therefore not required to have a cricket. Once I get in there with the shingles off, I will probably add some extra peel & stick as well as bonus metal, albeit not in a cricket fashion.

One caveat to the flashing joints is in the pitch - a faster slope with a shorter ‘high side to ridge line’ distance will prevent a lot of water from collecting. I think the total run is something like 8’ or so & as you can tell, the chimney intersects on the rake.


#4

Hi,

I have done chimneys up to 7’ without a criket or ice sheild.

They do not leak. I have to deal with snow and ice.

Butting the shingles to the chimney would be my concern. Water will hit the chimney and back up under the shingles. Ice and water shield will not stop that. It may keep the water out of the house, but it will not keep the water from going under the shingles.


#5

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

I have done chimneys up to 7’ without a criket or ice sheild.

They do not leak. I have to deal with snow and ice.

Butting the shingles to the chimney would be my concern. Water will hit the chimney and back up under the shingles. Ice and water shield will not stop that. It may keep the water out of the house, but it will not keep the water from going under the shingles.[/quote]

And that is why I would install either a metal pan, or a metal saddle behind the chimney.

The chances the flashings go behind the stone is pretty slim also, so it is possible a reglet needs to be saw-cut into the stone. However, if you do that, you could have issues with leaks in the chimney stack is not waterproof. If the masonry on the chimney leaks, they you may need to seal the masonry with a clear sealant. Of course, some sealants stop water in both directions, so not only can water not penetrate the masonry, it can’t escape either unless there are weep holes. Anyway, you might also want to take a look at the chimney cap (especially if it is mortar), before you open a can of worms.


#6

Ranchhand,

Is that the best you got.

That’s pathetic.

Check this out. Our idiots are way worse than your idiots. :smiley:

%between%http://www.roofersreview.com/d/9763-2/Cultured+stone+chimney+flashing+1.jpg

%between%http://www.roofersreview.com/d/9766-2/Cultured+stone+chimney+flashing+2.jpg

Excellent construction by all.


#7

I have seen that coultured stone quite frequently recently. That stone is probably on a metal lathe(with or without felt behind it) over top of either a block or wood foundation for the chimney. I would not just flash and counter flash directly over those stones as that stone over time has a tendency to become pouris and soak up water which will eventually make its way down that wood or block foundation. I have seen this happen every time these stones are used. You probably need to remove about 2’ of those stone to flash around the foundation, if is is block, flash and counterflash into the mortar joints, or install a riglet. If it is wood, flash around it and install ice and water shield over you flashings.Make sure you solder your seams and have a stone mason reinstall the stones.


#8

Cultured stone leaks, simple as that.


#9

Cultured Stone on Wiki (I am a link; you can click me)

I’m not a rock guy by any measure of the idea… so, am I working with ‘cultured stone’ here? This is a common “Hill Country Limestone” product you’re seeing on my chimney photos.

[quote]Today, cast stone is a Portland cement-based architectural precast concrete product manufactured using high quality fine and coarse aggregate as its primary constituents. Simulated stone, or look-alike products made with alternative ingredients such as gypsum, lightweight products, glass fiber, calcium silicate, stucco and other materials are less durable and not nearly as well time-tested. The use of a high percentage of fine aggregate creates a very smooth, consistent texture for the building elements being cast, resembling natural cut stone. Other ingredients such as chemical admixtures, pozzolans, and pigments also may be added.

Cast stone frequently is produced with a low water-to-cement ratio mixture with a “dry” (or “earth moist”) consistency. The mixture is consolidated into a mould using an air-driven tamping device or vibration under pressure, which is much like the formation of natural sedimentary rock. Products manufactured in this manner are referred to as vibrant-dry-tamped (VDT) cast stone. For cast stone mixtures produced with a slumpable consistency mixture, the concrete typically is consolidated using internal or external vibration applied to the production mould.

Over the last decade, new types of admixtures have been developed for VDT concrete products. These new admixtures do not normally work with “wet cast” concrete. These new plasticizers are more efficient than using air-entraining agents to increase compaction in VDT concrete. Some plasticizers have chemical properties that react with the cement to increase ultimate strengths of semi-dry concrete. Another important type of admixture for VDT concrete is integral waterproofing formulas. Tests have shown that some of these integral waterproofing admixtures have improved strength by as much as 20% while reducing the absorption by 40%. The increased strength and reduced absorption results in improved freeze/thaw durability.[/quote]


#10

I have done chimneys up to 7’ without a criket or ice sheild.

They do not leak. I have to deal with snow and ice.

Butting the shingles to the chimney would be my concern.

ditto that much of lefty.

first off ranch,
is the damn thing leakin?
if not, then leave it alone.
it looks fine other than the peace of metal
over the shingles at top corner, looks like normal southeastern u.s. shingle to cimney tyin to me. dont worry bout not seein the metal over the shingles at chimney bottom.
alot of people put the last shingle on top of the metal, in tar, instead of under it.
to answer your first question
What are my chances that the flashing is going fully up & under the brick for this chimney?
pretty damn good imo,
when the last time you seen no flashin around a chimney.
we can see the metal in the pics ide say its atleast
behind the stucco.

gweedo.

p.s. damn thats a nice drawing of the house
what program is that?


#11

[quote=“gweedo”]
p.s. damn thats a nice drawing of the house
what program is that?[/quote]

PaintBrush.


#12

thank you.

gweedo.


#13

HOLY SHIT!!!

[quote=“dennis”]Ranchhand,

Is that the best you got.

That’s pathetic.

Check this out. Our idiots are way worse than your idiots. :smiley:

%between%http://www.roofersreview.com/d/9763-2/Cultured+stone+chimney+flashing+1.jpg

%between%http://www.roofersreview.com/d/9766-2/Cultured+stone+chimney+flashing+2.jpg

Excellent construction by all.[/quote]

WOW!!!THAT IS BAD!good luck


#14

!!


#15

Looks like crap. No term flashing. No exposed back pan. No telling the condition of the metal. It stays wet like that.