Watertight?


#1

my roofers just finished my house today, not the singles but just the black paper that they tack down. I dont know anything about roofing. My mom was worried that it would leak if it rained and my roofer said this paper would be tacked down so tight that it would not leak, now this was earlier today and now it’s raining and its leaking everywhere in my house. My question is… is the paper really suppose to be water tight and the job was just done unproperly or was the roofer just lying? Thanks in advance.


#2

THe felt is a temp job only normally it will withstand a short rainfall without having a leak. Without seeing the felt job it is very hard to say if it is a mistake by the roofers or something else. I will never just felt a job and walk off with or without the threat of rain. I will also use the fiberglass felt that is alot more water resistant. Mind you felt is not waterproof. It is water resistant. I dont agree with tearing a whole roof of and felting it at all.


#3

Hi,

It was installed wrong. If you leave the paper exposed you need to give it a little more overlap.

I have done a house that the customer tore off the roof and felted it in. He did not have the money. So he tore it off and preped it. Took him 3 years to save the money. When I went out to give the price, I found out what he had done. He use 30# felt.

Water will not pass thru the felt. It has to do with the overlap. That is where they did not install it right.

New homes are dryed-in all the time.


#4

To add to lefty’s post, Areas like flashings, sidewalls, roof-to walls, skylights, chimneys, etc that will interrupt a clean flow of water will need special attention along with the felt.

I do it all the time, and do not think I have had a leak in 8 or 10 years, and never when I did them myself.

Your roofer did not do his due diligence. :frowning: Was he the low priced guy? New to the trade? A subcontractor of the contractor? Inexperienced, or plain old lazy?


#5

Heres the bad part…his insurance may not take care of interior damages if he did not take proper steps to watertight your roof. :frowning:


#6

well today i went onto the roof and saw some wierd things, they didn’t tack some of the black paper onto the roof good. The only used one tack on one corner and the wind blew it off. And alot of the tacks aren’t anchored good. I can pull them out with my hand with no strain and theirs alot more loose. I think this is where it started leaking. The roofer said he’s been doing roofs in texas for 25 years.


#7

hello i need money,
well its good you can get on your roof ,
alot of people cant, and have to go through what you are, goin through, without know whats happened.
what youve seen up there happens all the time, exspecially in florida.
the nails that pull rite out are probably in a crack between the boards.
tell the roofer "one of your knuckelheads put simplex cap nails in the cracks of the decking. could you bouble check the whole roof ".

as far as a section of dryin blowin off, that has happened to me.
it happens. exspecially in an area that storms alot.

so its the weekend , if you cant get a hold of the roofer then.
then get a hammer and go up there and nail it back down to the best of your ability. there should be some extra cap nails layin around in a bucket somewhere.

make sure your nail hits would. thats probably the most important thing in roofin.

good luck.
gweedo.


#8

Roofing removed should be re-applied the same day you should never strip more roofing than you can apply in the same day and if you cant roof the entire removed area you should use tarps not paper.Paper will not stop water by itself and will buckel when it gets wet sounds like you made a poor choice in a roofing company .If this were my house i would be quite pissed off . Here are Environmental Requirements:

  1. Work shall only begin when the contractor has decided to his satisfaction, that all specifications are workable as specified, and that the contractor can meet project and code requirements.

  2. Do not begin work when inclement weather is forecast to occur prior to the anticipated time of completion of the work item.

  3. The contractor shall be responsible for verifying the existing and forecasted weather conditions to determine when the conditions are acceptable for roof work.

  4. Roof application shall not proceed when there is moisture present in any form on the deck including but not limited to rain, dew, ice, frost or snow.

  5. Do not apply roofing membrane to a frozen deck.

  6. The contractor shall be prepared at all times to protect any uncompleted roof work from the rapid changes in the weather. If work continues during sudden rains to protect the interior of the building, then these areas shall be subsequently removed and replaced.

a. Areas of the substrate where ponding water occurs shall be built up prior to the installation of the roof system.

b. Do not remove anymore of the existing roof system than can be completely reinstalled with the new roofing system in the same day.

c. Ensure that the roof deck is structurally sound to support the live and dead load requirements of the new roofing system and rigid enough to support construction traffic. Do not store or load the roof deck above its load capacity.


#9

man it rains everyday in tampa bay florida.
you would never get any work done, here, with all those rules.
roofs here get torn off and dryed in the first day, shingles get loaded a day or 2 later , then the shingles get installed.
thats how most people do it here in tampa bay.

its funny how people think theres only one way to skin a cat.

gweedo.


#10

So a solid mopped base sheet and all insualtion below it would have to be replaced if it got rained on? Why?

Numbers 6 and 3 contradict each other.


#11

[quote=“jediroofwalker”]Roofing removed should be re-applied the same day you should never strip more roofing than you can apply in the same day and if you cant roof the entire removed area you should use tarps not paper.Paper will not stop water by itself and will buckel when it gets wet sounds like you made a poor choice in a roofing company .If this were my house i would be quite pissed off . Here are Environmental Requirements:

  1. Work shall only begin when the contractor has decided to his satisfaction, that all specifications are workable as specified, and that the contractor can meet project and code requirements.

  2. Do not begin work when inclement weather is forecast to occur prior to the anticipated time of completion of the work item.

  3. The contractor shall be responsible for verifying the existing and forecasted weather conditions to determine when the conditions are acceptable for roof work.

  4. Roof application shall not proceed when there is moisture present in any form on the deck including but not limited to rain, dew, ice, frost or snow.

  5. Do not apply roofing membrane to a frozen deck.

  6. The contractor shall be prepared at all times to protect any uncompleted roof work from the rapid changes in the weather. If work continues during sudden rains to protect the interior of the building, then these areas shall be subsequently removed and replaced.

a. Areas of the substrate where ponding water occurs shall be built up prior to the installation of the roof system.

b. Do not remove anymore of the existing roof system than can be completely reinstalled with the new roofing system in the same day.

c. Ensure that the roof deck is structurally sound to support the live and dead load requirements of the new roofing system and rigid enough to support construction traffic. Do not store or load the roof deck above its load capacity.[/quote]

I don’t know how new this guy is, but he’s from my area. I agree with him. I would never get into something that I know I cant complete or make weather tight before any weather hits. What you’re not understanding is that this is not Florida. We get weather here in New England at the drop of a dime and the weather people suck at predicting it. Every morning before I leave I check about 5 forecasts and cross analyze them, if I do not like what I see I either do something that is not weather sensitive or I stay home. Another thing you’re not seeing is that we have NO INSPECTIONS for a roof here in Mass. Gweedo is thinking we’re just going to “dry it in” according to strict florida codes, but really here, “drying it in” cost a fortune on these roofs which mostly have to be staged to the gill and are not walkable. I don’t want to set staging 10 times because it costs money and you will not be competitive. It’s so unpredictable here, you have to be very conservative when ripping roofs off. Often, when I see like a 20% chance of rain I’ll set up a tarp before ripping and work under it. If you’re using nail guns paper DOES NOT WORK! This is a geographical thing you guys wouldn’t understand I think.


#12

[quote=“gweedo”]man it rains everyday in tampa bay florida.
you would never get any work done, here, with all those rules.
roofs here get torn off and dryed in the first day, shingles get loaded a day or 2 later , then the shingles get installed.
thats how most people do it here in tampa bay.

its funny how people think theres only one way to skin a cat.

gweedo.[/quote]

What do you guys mean, when you say you have to dry the roof in?


#13

Hi,

Everything before you shingle. Felt and drip installed.


#14

Drying in works anywhere if you do it right.

Why will felt not work if youre using nail guns? I dont get it. I use nail guns and have dried in for years successfully. You do have to take additional precautions around penetrations an other flashings, but it is 100% doable.


#15

well im just here to help,
and if the h/o has a roof that is just dryed in ( that means the underlayment installed , jordan), then debating weather or not it should
have been done that way doesnt help.
ah i just read are problem. took me a second it was in s&g’s post.
yalls roofs are un walkable ours you can square dance on.
of course you cant dryin an entire steep new england roof, you have to shingle it as ya go cause of the staging.
come on you guys are makin me do all the work.
but seriously we ripem, dryem in the first day. then we get the shingles
loaded on the roof a day or two later, then we shingle it.

thats just the way it is, in sunny florida. woo hoo!!!

eya

gweedo

ps.
Aaronb what are you talkin about 6 an 3 contradict.


#16

Hi,

We dry-in the steep ones too. This will show you a roof dried-in.

http://community.webshots.com/album/435694827wsCoBH


#17

gweedo,

number 3 said no work if inclement weather is possible (which is everyday in the summer)

number 6 says be ready to cover in case of sudden inclement weather.

if inclement weather is possible (which it is everyday in the summer) then number 6 cannot apply.

I have dried in 12/12 roofs effectively, with no list time and without extra staging setup and break downs and re-sets.

It is pretty easy to do if you ponder it for a few.


#18

Lefty, that place looks like a power line spaghetti trap. :smiley:


#19

[quote=“AaronB.”]gweedo,

number 3 said no work if inclement weather is possible (which is everyday in the summer)

number 6 says be ready to cover in case of sudden inclement weather.

if inclement weather is possible (which it is everyday in the summer) then number 6 cannot apply.

I have dried in 12/12 roofs effectively, with no list time and without extra staging setup and break downs and re-sets.

It is pretty easy to do if you ponder it for a few.[/quote]

Aaron,

I don’t think I’m a dumb guy. But enlighten me as to how you rip and dry in a steep roof without extra setups, breakdowns, and resets. I was always told to roof what you rip unless its absolutely an emergency ONLY for the purpose of not restaging it over and over and restarting often. I’m genuinely enthusiastic to learn how you rip a staged roof (fine, a hook ladder), install paper, ice and water barrier, waste time with temp protrusions, and then roof without breaking down the staging that you just set up to get to those areas. I dont know man. I’ve bounced through a lot of companies of many kinds in search of the almighty dollar, never met one that could accomplish that yet. Tell me how to do it so I can be a millionaire! You know I love and respect your posts, but you’ll have to elaborate on this one brother.


#20

In the UK we have to by law work off scaffolding which obviously makes our work much easier to do. While I realise this might not be cost effective for you guys in the US because every body will price things differently, ie some would allow for the price of scaffolding and some will not.

If you roofing guys over the pond could get together and maybe try to make it compulsory for EVERY COMPANY to price and allow for scaffolding
it would make your job that bit easier and safer to do.
I do understand this would not happen over night, but if you guys could set the ball rolling now, then maybe future generations of roofers could work in a safer enviroment.
HAPPY ROOFING :slight_smile: