Valley confusion


#1

Hello. I know next to nothing about the best types of roof valleys. My roofer wants to use what he calls a California Cut. This is appealing to me visually, but I am concerned that is not recommended by the NRCA. Also, in perusing this board, some people feel that metal either under the shingle or over it is best. Should I move forward with the California Cut valley or consider something else??

I live in Ohio, if that matters.

brand


#2

I think the California cut is the same as we call the Tamko vally in these parts, if it is it is fine.


#3

California and Tamko = same = ok.


#4

Depending upon the pitch California valleys encourage smaller staggers.

I don’t like them but they do work.


#5

[quote="-Axiom-"]Depending upon the pitch California valleys encourage smaller staggers.

I don’t like them but they do work.[/quote]

Why do you not like them? Ad should I ask the roofer to place metal valleys underneath the shingles?


#6

I prefer Ice and water barrier to metel under the valleys, if the metel isn’t perfectly flat underneath you can get bubbles in the metel that will show through, but metel is better then nothing.

I don’t care for the California cut as most do it unless it’s a laminate shingle. We do somthing similar called a closed cut, basically it’s the same but we cut out and lap any slots that are in or near the valley on the under side. The look is the same but the life of the valley is longer. The reason for that is the water has a clean flow down the valley without being redirected by every slot in the shingle.


#7

I have fixed several that were leaking, this was because of workmanship.

I my area the guys that use California valleys seem to put out lower quality work in general.
Because of this I equate a California valley with sloppy workmanship and a California valley as being a shortcut.

Properly done they will work fine, but to do it right involves cutting the shingles.
Not having to cut the shingles in the valley is supposed to be one of the features of this type of valley.
It is faster.

Also the shingle that is layed in the valley creates a small hump.
As mentioned in my previous post they also encourage smaller staggers depending upon the pitch of the roof.
As the pitch increases the stagger gets smaller.

Unless you are requesting open metal valleys it would be best to let your roofer do the type of valley that he is comfortable with.

This is just my opinion and others experiences may differ.

I prefer a closed cut valley or open metal.


#8

Just to be sure, can someone describe the California cut?

I know the Tamko valley and the closed cut. THe Tamko is when they lay the “bleeder” up the valley and run the shingles until the bottom corner meets the valley side of the bleeder?


#9

short cut…period!


#10

[quote=“AaronB.”]Just to be sure, can someone describe the California cut?

I know the Tamko valley and the closed cut. THe Tamko is when they lay the “bleeder” up the valley and run the shingles until the bottom corner meets the valley side of the bleeder?[/quote]

The roof across the street uses what he calls a California Cut. It looks a lot like this picture which some have called a Tamko.

home-and-garden.webshots.com/pho … 5488Lumlhc


#11

LOL . thats my picture from a job in Hingham,Ma. We installed it about ten years ago and it still looks good as I drive by. You will notice the proper spacing of the offf set.


#12

nice job J. Bennet,hickory, my favorite flavor,lol…
I have never tried that short cut, I do closed cut myself… Would be good when shingles are cold I guess…or for 40-50 yr thicker shingles…


#13

jbennettroofing of hingham mass did the “roof across the street” in ohio? im probably reading this wrong


#14

No we don’t go to Ohio. to long a ride. A Tamko vally is no shortcut it is an acceptable vally and is even on some bundle wrappers. I will admit that I once was a skeptic and would not allow it, but my concerns about it were unfounded and we have now done thousands of them.


#15

I have had the same experience and feel the same way. It is actually less waste and you are assured that no knife blade ever touches the center of that valley.
Some people might actually call that better.
Not a cheap shortcut!
It is faster(bonus), but only slightly.
I wouldn’t do it if i thought the integrity of the roof was less in any way.
Though it is not for every closed valley roof.

I only do it on certain pitches…
It’s perfect for certain in-between pitches.
Don’t do it on certain lower pitches.
Don’t do it on certain steeper pitches.

Axiom is right about how with this style(on some roofs) you still have to cut the shingles to do it right.
On steeper roofs, If you don’t cut them, the seam runs will be shorter
(and shorter with every pitch increase)

So cut em!
Its still 100 times less cutting, less chance of gouging the center of the valley…,less waste,faster.


#16

please do not lay a couple a shingles long ways in the valley and then but the corner of every shingle, stair stepping up the valley.

dont like it.
just dont.

gweedo.


#17

You guys ever run open valleys that way? Chalk a line each side an inch and a half each side I run my valleys open that way.


#18

no we havent tried that.


#19

Thank to all of you who have replied. Based on your responses, I have decided to go with the California Cut. The roofer in question has done a ton of them and says that is the best way to go.


#20

I run all my valleys open I started doing that way because even when I cut them I still bead and edge my valleys and since you have to clip the corners when you cut them, why not just run it in straight. I think it looks better because its not so thick and I save 1 bundle of shingle for every 8’ of valley.