Trimming fascia (With pics!)


#1

Hello guys. I have finally found a contractor with a license, referrals, a long term business history, and a clean BBB, and a fair market price.

He said that the reason that the rain run off is going between the drip edge and the fascia is because the fascia is higher than the roof deck. He wants to send a carpenter out here to trim down the fascia before installing the new roof. This will be a separate charge.

Is this a standard procedure in the industry? Will it affect my home negatively? How is this better than replacing the fascia altogether?

Also, they only offer an 18 month labor warranty. Is this standard? Most contractors offer a five year warranty. However, I have heard and am a witness that even though they offer the long warranty, it does not mean that they will honor it.

Thanks.

s165.photobucket.com/albums/u41/cyndyb_2007/


#2

I give a five year warranty on shingles always, sometimes more, and if theres a problem after that i’ll still fix it. Ask if they will do the same. Eighteen months, it seems they’re not to confident in there work. Not to mention they can’t even cut wood. Im not one to bad mouth someone but this guy has a screw loose.


#3

Hi,

If that is the length of the warranty. Then that is it. You would be better off asking him why he is giving that length warranty. He would know this, not us.

As for the fascia being higher. This does not sound like a reason for the water running behind the drip edge. Could be wrong. Show us some pictures.


#4

He said that he gives an 18 month warranty because if a roof installation has problems, it will be known within 2 years. Thanks again for your input.


#5

What he ment to say is the black tar he uses fails at about 2 years. I would not work with someone with a less than 2 year warranty. Something sounds not right.


#6

[quote=“cyndyb”]Hello guys. I have finally found a contractor with a license, referrals, a long term business history, and a clean BBB, and a fair market price.

He said that the reason that the rain run off is going between the drip edge and the fascia is because the fascia is higher than the roof deck. He wants to send a carpenter out here to trim down the fascia before installing the new roof. This will be a separate charge.

Is this a standard procedure in the industry? Will it affect my home negatively? How is this better than replacing the fascia altogether?

Also, they only offer an 18 month labor warranty. Is this standard? Most contractors offer a five year warranty. However, I have heard and am a witness that even though they offer the long warranty, it does not mean that they will honor it.

Thanks.[/quote]

I’m trying to be as partial as I can on this, but I’ve seen roofs installed where the fascia was higher than the bottom edge of the roof. First off, they weren’t any problem. Second, the best way to remedy that is to return it to the way it was when it was built that way, and reinstall cedar shingles on the bottom edge.

I’d bet, in all actuality, the drip edge didn’t extend past the necessary imaginary line to properly shed the water. Or, even simpler than that, I’ve seen drip edge nailed too high and then the wind blows it up and buckles it so that part of the drip edge is actually pointing the water right into the fascia…

Trying to be nice here, this guy doesn’t sound like the sharpest tool in the shed, any way you cut it.


#7

LoL… personally, I’m partial to work done right (which is definitely something I can’t see this guy doing).

Question: If the guy says a roof will leak within 2 years, then why the 6 month gap between then & his warranty @ 18 months?

Certainly all anyone halfway competent has to do is snap a chalk line for the distance needed to be removed & then use a saw with a guide bar tool that clamps into it (my Ridgid has one & it’s certainly not an exclusive).

Even on a 60’ long fascia, I couldn’t see asking for more than $ 75.00 provided it was a 1 story roof.

As to why it might be leaking, on a ‘typical’ A Fram roof (gabled), the rake (sloped parts that go from the top of the A to the base or eaves) is supposed to get felt UNDER the drip edge & on the eaves, the felt goes OVER the drip edge.

As it is, provided you don’t really care for how it looks with the dip on the areas near the eaves due to high fascia, this can be sealed over of sorts with a roll of Peel & Stick / Peel & Seal that has felt properly laid over it. Peel & Seal / Peel & Stick type products come in 3’ wide rolls, so if you have someone who can run a knife really well, they should be able to get 150’ worth of this product by cutting it in 1’ wide strips (I’m a native Shreveporter & know fully well that Baton Rouge doesn’t get much in the way of ice & snow).


#8

no offense ranch but peel and stick will not slove this problem.

I would find a different contractor period.


#9

Hi,

So why are you getting a new roof installed?


#10

For Lefty and others who are not familiar with my problem.

roofing.com/post-13773.html&highlight=#13773

Long story short. I had a defective roof installation 3 years ago. Drip edge put on last. Water has been running between the drip edge and the fascia board when it rains. (Improper run off) Three roofers claimed to repair the problem. No solution. I also began having leaks from nail pop-ups. I have decided to have it replaced.


#11

Sorry, Cindy - didn’t see where you were going to get an entire new roof.

As for the peel & stick, I was suggesting a drip edge with maximum deck overlay & apply Peel & Stick over the drip edge & then up the decking by a total of one foot… this was an exclusive attempt @ fixing only the perimiter leak under the 1st &2nd course of shingles.

As to the rest of it, if you ARE getting an entire new roof, again - on a 1 story with under 300 linear ft. of fascia, I couldn’t see asking for more than $ 100.00 to make this fascia cut.

Certainly a whole new roof would alleviate any of the color match issues, however a 3 year old roof won’t have that much in the way of aging to contend with.