Torch down base sheet fastner question


#1

I’m pricing a torch down roof on long island here in NY.
Small job. approx. 15x35 right next to the driveway so I can drop a roll off in the driveway and throw the two layers I’m ripping off right into the dumpster. Dumpsters about $600…ouch.

Thing is its real competitive around here (I know, where isn’t it?) and I have no base sheet nails left from other jobs. The nails with the square metal heads (sorry, don’t know exactly what they’re called). I have to buy a 50# box at about $120.
So the question is…can I use the regular 1 1/4" roofers if I use extras?

I basically do all home improvements so I don’t always have extra roofing material left over like that.
Also…There’s aluminum flashing there now…up under the house cedar shingles and over two layers of roofing which looks good(the flashing looks good). The first layer looks like regular tab shingles and the top layer is granular roll roofing.
Normally I’d install a kant on the inside corner (against the sidewall of the house and onto the roof) but do you think I could slip the rubber roof under the existing flashing or should I rip the flashing off…rip off a layer or two of sidewall shingles and roll the rubber roof up onto the sidewall over a kant? I already know what I think I should do but it’d be nice for you to tell me I don’t really have to…lol. Sometimes I do go over board and I’d love to think this was one of those times…lol. I know, I know.
I also know its hard to get a price online being ya’ll are from different parts of the country but what do you get for “labor” for a rip off like this and to install the base sheet and rubber torch down along with drip edges?
Also…anyone ever rip a 2x3 diagonally to make your own Kant?
Thanks
andy on Long Island, NY
cliffordrenovations.com


#2

You should use 1" steel round top cap nails or 3" plates w/screws.
The head on a roofing nail is too small of a diameter to hold the base sheet well.
Coil nail heads are smaller than hand nails.

What is the pitch of the low slope going into the wall?
Is this a pitch transition?

You probably should just remove the cedar sidewall shingles and run your base sheet and modified 8" up the wall.
then replace the sidewall shingles.


#3

I doubt your insured to install torch down roofing if you dont know what nails to use or dont want to buy a full box so you should probably get a roofer.

If you do decide to do it yourself the best way to tell if your torch is hot enough is to run it accross the cedar shingles first. If they dont catch on fire the first time keep going until you hear fire engines.

PS. Make sure the homeowners are out of the house first.


#4

call an experienced,liscensed,insured,bonded roofing contractor. you are in over your head


#5

[quote="-Axiom-"]You should use 1" steel round top cap nails or 3" plates w/screws.
The head on a roofing nail is too small of a diameter to hold the base sheet well.
Coil nail heads are smaller than hand nails.

What is the pitch of the low slope going into the wall?
Is this a pitch transition?

You probably should just remove the cedar sidewall shingles and run your base sheet and modified 8" up the wall.
then replace the sidewall shingles.[/quote]

Don’t know the exact pitch but there’s a pitch just a tad more than being able to call it a “flat” roof and a bit too much pitch to use a tabbed shingle in my opinion so I’m just playing it safe and doing a torch down. Seems to me a torch down rubber roof is the best job as compared to say a mineral coated tar down roof and to me torching a roof is actually no more difficult than taring a mineral roof down…maybe even easier to torch it down and I’d have to say hands down a better job to boot.

Just wish I didn’t have to buy a 50# box of those square head nails. Oh well…is what it is.

One other thought…When I run the rubber up the side wall then nail back a course of shingles…I’m thinking I should trowel some karney flashing cement along my nail line to seal up my shingle nail holes.
I tend to always go a bit overboard. Better safer than sorry.
I’m figuring all in all I have about 5 square.

edit to the other posters: And this is far from my first torch down roof. None of my other roofs have ever leaked. And obviously I know what nails to use being I’m talking about it in my question. My only question about them was whether or not I might be able to use roofers if I used extras. I’ve seen roofing companies do parapit walls and never use Kants so don’t tell me about how perfect every “roofer” is. and I’m fully licensed and insured.


#6

Andy, if you are not in a high wind area, you can use roofing nails for the underlayment. Nail it tight and for extra measure nail the top of the “modified bitumen” rolls at the seam.
Although there is really no reason you should balk at buying the right material for the job. Around here we compete on quality, not price.

You can seal your nails with Karnak as long as the cement is covered with the sidewall shingles and does not show.

Pull the wall shingles and replace the old flashing. No way to slip roll roofing under there and do a decent job.
Make sure your insurer knows you are using a torch on the roof, or you won’t be covered if there is an accident.

Going rate around here is $125.00 per hour for labor if you know what you are doing.


#7

Thanks Dennis,
I think I’ll just spring for the 50# box of nails. Seems I eventually end up doing a torch down a cpl a times a year on average in one instance or another. Last one I did was under a mahogany porch floor I did. I screwed 5/4" x 6 CCA sleepers over the roofing. I sandwiched Karnak flashing cement between the sleepers where the screws were going and the rubber roof. worked out great and I can imagine I’ll be doing more like that so with that in mind the extra hundred bucks for the nails will be water over the roof…lol.

Good idea about the nails in the seams though. http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/6143/img_1201928446.jpg


#8

some morehttp://www.roofing.com/images/topics/6143/img_1201928995.jpghttp://www.roofing.com/images/topics/6143/img_1201929060.jpg


#9

The proper fastening pattern for base is 9" on center for headlap and 12" staggered in center.Axioms correct on sidewall code dictates 8" min height on side,headwall and curb.I would recommend 3-coursing the top of your wall flashing and not your wood shingles.High nail your wood shingles so you don’t penetrate your base flashing.Helpful hint never torch over aluminum flashing.


#10

one more
That was three years ago and zero leaks : )


#11

I do have a question for you guys. How do “you all” do the last sheet that goes up the wall from the decking?
Say on a 30’ length. What I’ve done is split it into 3-10’ers. torch the end length (torching the 10’ way) onto the previous sheet thats down and torch the roll…and roll it out and up onto the wall.


#12

i rest my case


#13

Get a life…LOL


#14

[quote=“Anonymous”]…Jane …you ignorant slut…
…[/quote]

POOF… YOUR A ROOFER …& YA DON"T NEED NO BADGES… LOL


#15

i have a life. it is running a 150 employee ROOFING business. i am not a jackleg of all trades.but, i am a master of one. can you guess.
the fact that you screwed thru your modified roof and then sealed it with mastic shows me a little something.
hint; modified bitumin and mastic are not permanantly compatible.
if i called your insurance agent and asked him if you are insured for torch applied roofing what would he say or do?


#16

I forgot to post this part of fm 1-90 50% increase on perimeter and 75% in corner defined as 40% of building height or 10% of roof area the lesser of the two.


#17

[quote=“roofboss”]i have a life. it is running a 150 employee ROOFING business. i am not a jackleg of all trades.but, i am a master of one. can you guess.
the fact that you screwed thru your modified roof and then sealed it with mastic shows me a little something.
hint; modified bitumin and mastic are not permanantly compatible.
if i called your insurance agent and asked him if you are insured for torch applied roofing what would he say or do?[/quote]

LOL, I almost fell out of my comfy hair laughing at that. :smiley:
I tend to agree.