Tar Paper Required before 2nd Layer?


#1

I will be installing a new roof over a single layer of 3 tab shingles. I’ll be installing 30 year architectural singles. Do I need to install tar paper before laying the new shingles? I’ve torn off multiple layers of shingles on a couple of my rental houses and none of them have had tar paper between layers.


#2

well, first of all, i would never do a layover.

but the simple answer to your question, is no.


#3

Not on layover


#4

[quote=“Agape”]well, first of all, i would never do a layover.

but the simple answer to your question, is no.[/quote]

Well said on both accounts. Although I once saw a roof in Florida with 5 layers I wish I would have kept the picture.


#5

Hi,

There is a lot of good information on the wrapper.


#6

"well, first of all, i would never do a layover.

but the simple answer to your question, is no."
Well said.

Why would you want to do this so that you’ll shorten the life of the roof? A 30 year roof is lucky to see 20 years nowadays when done right. You’ll possibly be doing this again in 10 years or so.


#7

CertainTeed does not recomend the practice of felt in between layers. a “nesting” method is required to meet warrenty specifications.


#8

Thanks for the replies. I expected to get questioned as to why would I want to do a layover. My usual preference is to tear off as well. The quote I received for a tear off and installation of 20 year three tab shingles is $6000 (probably a reasonable price). However, a local Lowes store had a clearance on Owens 30 year Oakridge Laminated shingles for under $10 per bundle. They are normally $27 but this particular store will no longer carry Estate Grey so they marked them down to get them out of inventory. My total cost for materials including new vent flashing and exhust fans is $1500. Professional contractors only install material they provide. So, the issue is time and cost. I’m not a professional but I’ve installed new roofs on 4 of my rental houses. It’s a matter of time and money. The decking is solid and there are no leaks. My thinking is that a layover is a job I can do in a couple of days with a helper. While the layover will shorten the life of the shingles this would be mitigated somewhat by using 30 year shingles. I’m adding electric fans to help remove heat. I’ll bank the $4000 I save and replace both layers in 10 to 15 years.

Still think it’s a bad idea?


#9

yes. its a terrible idea.

but its your house, do what you want with it.

let me ask you this…

if replacing the brakes on your car, and only the pads on the outside of the rotor were worn down, would you go ahead and replace them both? turn the rotors? bleed the fluid when you are finished?

why do anything half ass? especially when its something as big of an investment like a HOUSE.


#10

you cant find somebody that will do a tear off and install with your materials? That seams strange to me but then again Ive never been asked to do that. if your in houston by chance I could find you a crew that would do it.

Im with the other guys though… do it right the first time and I assure you that your long term investment will be well worth it.


#11

[quote=“cwtowne”]Thanks for the replies. I expected to get questioned as to why would I want to do a layover. My usual preference is to tear off as well. The quote I received for a tear off and installation of 20 year three tab shingles is $6000 (probably a reasonable price). However, a local Lowes store had a clearance on Owens 30 year Oakridge Laminated shingles for under $10 per bundle. They are normally $27 but this particular store will no longer carry Estate Grey so they marked them down to get them out of inventory. My total cost for materials including new vent flashing and exhust fans is $1500. Professional contractors only install material they provide. So, the issue is time and cost. I’m not a professional but I’ve installed new roofs on 4 of my rental houses. It’s a matter of time and money. The decking is solid and there are no leaks. My thinking is that a layover is a job I can do in a couple of days with a helper. While the layover will shorten the life of the shingles this would be mitigated somewhat by using 30 year shingles. I’m adding electric fans to help remove heat. I’ll bank the $4000 I save and replace both layers in 10 to 15 years.

Still think it’s a bad idea?[/quote]

You are not saving any money if you plan to keep the place.
In addition to your roof failing before its time you will have to pay substantially more to remove and dispose of your 2 layer roof.

Remember you are asking a bunch of professional roofers, any decent roofer will recommend a tear off as opposed to a roof over.
Somebody pushing a roofover is somebody you don’t want working on your roof.


#12

go down to the day labor place, and hire 4 guys at $50/each a day to tear that sucker off. they should have it all down to the decking in 4-6 hours even if they have no idea what they are doing. lol

best $200 you will spend.


#13

not that I condone hiring illegal workers but its not really a bad idea.

chances are most of them have tore off a roof before anyways. Hell just today I saw the competition picking up some day laborers in his fully wrapped truck! LMAO!


#14

not everybody at the day labor place is illegal.

around here, there are a lot of out of work legal americans looking for a decent days pay.

i dont hire them, but if i was just a landlord, installing my own roof, and trying to save some $$, i would hire a few for a day.


#15

gotcha. Im not used to that being down here in houston.

I shouldnt make the assumption that they are all illegal so my apologies if I offended anyone.


#16

Although I personally reccomend a tear-off, you CAN do a roofover as long as you use nals long enough to go into the deck at least 3/4" on decks 3/4" or thicker OR on thinner decks nails must go at least 1/8" through the deck. You must have proper ventilation, and replace the flashings. If a roofover is not allowed then why is it an approved and warranted installation method from the MANUFACTURER. Assuming you have a solid deck and do all of the above, a roofover will last as long as a tear-off.


#17

ok now that you know all the pros here dont like
recovers.
no you dont need any felt.
nail the damn things up there.

gweedo.


#18

[quote=“gweedo”]ok now that you know all the pros here dont like
recovers.
no you dont need any felt.
nail the damn things up there.

gweedo.[/quote]

LOL

i love you gweedo


#19

Not ALL the “pros” Gweed


#20

I thoroughly disagree with the majority here with my belief in recovers on one or two current roof coverings. Preface these remarks with the qualification the it must be that the current roof deck must be with a good sheathing surface free from rot or other defects. Current roof coverings must not be thoroughly wore out or exposed down to felt base with granules missing. That said many roofs can be recovered with another roof covering with quality materials.
By not doing a recover for whatever reason leaves the consumer with the false belief that roofing manufacturers are making a chit product which is so untrue.
I can not believe that so many roofers are parroting the same line of crap just to get the sale for a complete tear off when one is not needed. IMHO.