Straight shooting coil nailer


#1

Can anybody tell me why the highly advanced makers of air tools have not come out with a straight shooting coil nailer? Senco had one, and then they discontinued it.


#2

Hi,

Sometimes it is the nails.

Sometimes it is the way you hold the gun.

Never had the gun shoot crooked.


#3

Why would They Make A Crooked shooting
Nail Gun?


#4

you keep your straight nail gun…i like mine gay :shock:


#5

LOL


#6

Its all in the way you are holding your gun. Every gun i have used shot straight once i learned how to use it.


#7

I noticed with Bostich If you use the cheap nails from home deopot and even some suplly houses it affects the way the gun shoots. Look at the wires on the coils. If it has a lo wire it wont work with Bostich but shoots fine with Hitachi.


#8

O.k. so I’ve used the Makita, Hitachi, Bostich, Porter Cable, and the new Senco Extreme Pro 455XP. The worst two are definitely Makita and Hitachi, one out of two nails aren’t straight. The Makita cannot even shoot a 3/4 inch nail. The other three are good for a while but not consistent.

Holding the gun right will work if don’t mind putting on 1 square an hour. The old Senco SCN 40 R was consistently straight, no matter how you held it and no matter how fast you went. Another advantage of the old Senco was that there was no bounce after you shot the nail.


#9

Every Senco nailgun I have been tricked into purchasing has failed prematurely, that is both stick fed framers and their horrible excuse for a roofing nailer.
Senco nailers keep the repairman very busy.

Best nailguns I ever had were Bostich N-12’s, why they changed these and started producing rn-45’s is beyond me…

I hope you are nailing felt with those 3\4 inchers because they are too short for any shingle I can think of.

In my humble opinion the only roofing nailers that are worth a crap are Bostich, Hitachi, and Paslode.
I never used a Makita…
My Hitachi’s work very well for many months before they need rings.
I don’t tolerate my men throwing my hoses in the sand though… :evil:


#10

3/4 inch nails are for the overhang. So they don’t poke through. It’s a pretty common practice in Western Washington.

All things considered, none of the nail guns do the job right. I find this to be quite upsetting.


#11

A 3/4 inch nail will not provide the required 3/4 inch deck penetration, therefore voiding your wind warranty. 7/8 inch nail is the shortest you can use, and that is only on a 3 tab shingle.


#12

You are right, a 3/4 inch nail does not satisfy the nailing code, but it’s still the standard practice in Western Washington. Most of the homes are built with a two foot exposed overhang. Homeowners hate to look up and see nails poking through the plywood.

Bye the way, it’s superroofer, with a u.


#13

All the exposed overhangs I run into have at least 1\2" osb or plywood with another 1\2" (usually beadboard) piece of wood on the underside (exposed to the weather).
This is almost always an architectural detail on high end homes, 1 1\4" nails do not penetrate the underside if the detail is built correctly.

I have never seen coil nails shorter than 7\8".
You won’t find a nail gun that will shoot nails this short straight.
They tend to tumble inside the chamber and they jam a lot.


#14

Well most builders don’t do that in Western Washington. Not even the high end $600,000 plus homes. Some enclose the overhangs, some don’t


#15

Hi,

Hand nail


#16

I can barely hold a 1" roofing nail in my fat little fingers.
Sore fingers at the end of the day. :frowning:


#17

[quote=“jaredpritchett”]You are right, a 3/4 inch nail does not satisfy the nailing code, but it’s still the standard practice in Western Washington. Most of the homes are built with a two foot exposed overhang. Homeowners hate to look up and see nails poking through the plywood.

Bye the way, it’s superroofer, with a u.[/quote]

Gee, I sure am glad you told me that. Couldn’t have figured it out without your help. :roll:

super was already taken.


#18

I’ve found that Hitachi’s don’t like shooting one inch nails. 1 1/4in work like clock work.


#19

Question for Sooper…

Do you give your clients an option for the shorter nails on the exposed soffit or do you go right for this?

I have so many customers who select the short nail choice (or staples, which I don’t ever like to use) that I am now considering a separate form to have them sign explaining that it’s not code & neither I nor the mfg. cannot guarantee the shingle will stand up to moderate muchless light gale force winds.