Step Flashing - my latest technical detail


#1

Because it’s so hard to describe it & a single image just doesn’t do justice to the system…

Feel free to copy this & use it on your own work. If you’d like, send me an Email or PM & I can send you the .jpg.


#2

Why is the first step flashing exposed?


#3

Well, we’re assuming this is up slope & there are other shingles all around (not just the ones I’ve shown).

I always leave a slight 1/8" or so in exposure & don’t line it up perfectly even with the bottom of the reveal.


#4

You always run one step for every course and keep it up about a 1/4" from the reveal. corners should be done with an oversized lead step so you can wrap the corners. I dont care for the diagram.


#5

Hi,

I would not do it like that. I do not see the purpose of the diagram?


#6

This is primarily to show customers (via Email posting or for once I get my website operational) how Step Flashing is laid.

It’s often difficult to explain this to someone verbally, so that’s what this resource is for.

As for the corner portion of the detail, I could only fit so much on one page & still leave room for an informational panel.

Notice that I don’t have any overlay with siding over it or show it incorporating a reglet…


#7

No reason to leave that 1/4" exposed at the bottom of each shingle. Only flashing you will see of mine is where it meets the apron (front flashing) maybe. Normally I would do the opposite of that and hide the flashing by a 1/2" or so. As long as you lap the steps by 3" or so you’re golden.


#8

How long did it take to draw that diagram?


#9

Hi,

Do you really think a customer cares how the roof is installed? Other then correctly.


#10

Gee, guys… I’m not really feeling the love on this one.

I guess it took me about 3 hours to do it on the notebook up in the living room (would have been faster, but I’m usually wrangling 2 little kids @ the same time).

Yes, I have had customers ask me what the lump is alongside a deck to vertical connection (turnback) & I will use this as an explanation as to what an alternative is.


#11

Eh, sorry Ranch Hand. Don’t take it to heart. The diagram is nice if you meet somone who needs shoe and tell, I just run that detail different than you is all.


#12

umm wheres the diverter.?
I could just take some pictures step by step. And i dont do mine like that. On all the new construction we use diverters.
If ya want i could makes some picture of what im talking about.
It nmake alot more sense if you had pictures step by step. And maybe incorporate a diverter.
Anyways peace.


#13

roofing buster,

I’d like to see pics of the diverter you mentioned. Is that a piece you put at the corner.


#14

[quote=“roofing buster”]umm wheres the diverter.?
I could just take some pictures step by step. And i dont do mine like that. On all the new construction we use diverters.
If ya want i could makes some picture of what im talking about.
It nmake alot more sense if you had pictures step by step. And maybe incorporate a diverter.
Anyways peace.[/quote]

I am assuming you are talking about a kick-out flashing.

Ranch,

For the purposes of showing a home owner some details, I think your drawings will work fine, but I feel that actual step 1, step 2, etc…actual job photos would do yourself more justice. Also, I too disagree with the bottom step flashing baby tin being exposed, but as long as it works for you, that is what counts.

Have you considered the details from the NRCA or SMACNA manuals to import into your presentation?

I like actual photos better still though.

Ed


#15

sorry Ranch, but that is just not how I would do it.
But I know it dosent rain that much down your way :slight_smile:


#16

[quote=“roofing buster”]umm wheres the diverter.?
I could just take some pictures step by step. And i dont do mine like that. On all the new construction we use diverters.
If ya want i could makes some picture of what im talking about.
It nmake alot more sense if you had pictures step by step. And maybe incorporate a diverter.
Anyways peace.[/quote]

Well on all New construction we have to put a diverter(thats what i call them) AKA kick out flashing.
But i guess on re roofs not all flashing is done right. One of the biggest reasons i dont do reroofs. Yeah i know they make more money.yada yada…
But and on longer runs up the walls usually half way we also use another diverter.
I havent been on a re roof that has proper flashing.
Not once. I guess that says alot about the new rules and regualations and maybe alot about the roofers of the past.

And another note i pu the starter strip down first then the first flashing then diverter over top first flashing. Then i contiue on normaly.

Now i wanna draw some pics.
thanks Ranch hand for the inspiration.


#17

A diverter at the bottom AND halfway up?

I think a photo would be better than a drawing. I’m a roofer from the past and I don’t get what you are saying.


#18

Only “diverter” I can think of on a step flashing would be what we call a stucco box. When you need to kick the water out from behind the stucco wall on the very last step flashing in a straight run. No reason at all to divert water on a step flashed wall that meets an apron/front flashing.


#19

Well… we often add a kickout @ the bottom of a flashing run (any vertical to roof deck run) to prevent water from running directly down the wall, like on a chimney.

I looked @ a house just yesterday where their Masonite is in great shape everywhere on the house EXCEPT for the the bottom 2’ of the chimney. Water has been pouring onto it for years & a good sized chunk needs replacing.

It also helps to direct water into a gutter if there is one because as we all know there’s often up to an inch or so gap between a gutter termination & a wall joint.


#20

Here is a link to a good guide to kick out flashings and where they promote better roof drainage, without encoaching the exterior wall cladding materials.

ibacos.com/pubs/RoofFlashingGuidelines.pdf

Ed