Starting a roofing company


#1

I’ve been flat roofing for almost 4 years now and i’m interested in one day starting a company of my own. i know i don’t have enough experience now to run an entire company with multiple crews as well i do not have the money to do so. I do however have the experience to put a roof on myself. I would like to start doing repairs and side jobs on the side maybe on weekends or after work some days to get started and get some clients so that when i do one day open a real company i’m not starting from scratch. What i’m wondering is what i need to do on the business end of it. I mean roofing isn’t rocket science but iamb a roofer not a business man. Do i need licenses and insurance and what not (excluding a hot works permit). What if i only do residentials?? what is my best way to go about starting to do side jobs and repairs???


#2

Dopey Roofing LLC


#3

lol thats just the kind of message i want to portray in my advertising i’m a dopey roofer hehe


#4

you live in Canadia, so i have no idea what kinds of local laws you would have there.

but i’ll tell you this… if you work for a roofing company, and you do “side jobs”, as far as i am concerned (and im sure your boss feels the same way) you are stealing.

stealing = fired.

and getting fired may just be the motivation you need to get your own roofing company started. I know its worked for a few of my former employees. lol


#5

You would need business license,liablty insurance,and wcb if you have anyone workin for ya,and I agree with Agape,if you did all this workin for me you would be canned,why would I give work to my competion? :roll:


#6

Agape - Why are side jobs stealing? And I’m not talking stealing leads from your boss.


#7

im sorry dopey.
but im not shure about dopey,
bein the first word the customer heres.

sorry .

gweedo.


#8

You are stealing from the shingle roofing market place. Why would your sisters best friend pay $5000.00 to do a roof properly, when they can pay you $3000.00 to do a roof what they think is being done properly. This takes that potential job off of the market and drives the market price down which means less work and benefits for your co-workers.(stealing from your co-workers) You think you are making good money because you aren’t paying taxes, insurance, and any overhead needed to warrant, provide safety,or proper equipment for a project that is required for a quality job.(stealing from the government) What your sister’s best friend doesn’t know is that if you fall and get badly injured, it’s possible that her homeowners insurance will have to pick up the tab. As well as if there are any problems, she’ll most likely hire a professional to fix it.(stealing from your sisters best friend) Last but not least, since you’ve been spending week nights and week ends to trying and get this completed, you’re not giving 100% on your main job that your boss is paying for. (stealing from your boss) One more, you need 2 more pcs of drip edge and a handfull of nails to finish…hmmm, I wonder where you might get it. (maybe steal it?) You asked how is this stealing. My question is how is it not?


#9

[quote=“d531”]

You are stealing from the shingle roofing market place. Why would your sisters best friend pay $5000.00 to do a roof properly, when they can pay you $3000.00 to do a roof what they think is being done properly. This takes that potential job off of the market and drives the market price down which means less work and benefits for your co-workers.(stealing from your co-workers) You think you are making good money because you aren’t paying taxes, insurance, and any overhead needed to warrant, provide safety,or proper equipment for a project that is required for a quality job.(stealing from the government) What your sister’s best friend doesn’t know is that if you fall and get badly injured, it’s possible that her homeowners insurance will have to pick up the tab. As well as if there are any problems, she’ll most likely hire a professional to fix it.(stealing from your sisters best friend) Last but not least, since you’ve been spending week nights and week ends to trying and get this completed, you’re not giving 100% on your main job that your boss is paying for. (stealing from your boss) One more, you need 2 more pcs of drip edge and a handfull of nails to finish…hmmm, I wonder where you might get it. (maybe steal it?) You asked how is this stealing. My question is how is it not?[/quote]

Convoluted logic…


#10

“Convoluted logic…”

You must do side jobs.


#11

I did side jobs while I worked for others, they never had a problem with it.
My men have done side jobs while working for me, I let them use all my tools.

If they want to do some honest work on their days off because they want or need more money, more power to them.

To call it stealing is a monumental leap.
Convoluted logic is used to justify this monumental leap.


#12

Thats a weird logic. Whenever I used to do sidejobs I always let the boss know I was going to do it. He was a good guy so it didnt matter. I always told whoever I was doing the roof for that I will bring my boss along and he usually ordered the shingles under the company name so the prices would be cheaper for the homeowner and they would get delieverd like it was a normal job of ours. He did not do the full mark up but he did mark it up a few dollars a square to make money that way. He also made sure I understood that my job for him was my number one priority and it needed to stay that way. At the time I had no tools of my own so he let me “rent” his from him for 100 dollars for the job. In the end, he also made money and fully knew what I was doing. I even had him help me on one of them.

Is that still stealing from my boss?


#13

I dont see how it is stealing at all if you buy your own materials and tools and do it on your off days.

Ive been doing exactly that for about 2 months with my current job so that I could build up the cash flow to break out of the company and go it on my own. The company I work for doesn’t screw around with small spot repairs so I tell the customer if they would like I can do it for them instead of them having to have another guy out.

Im also moving to a completely different market so Im not going to be taking any of their customers or anything like that. I never like to burn bridges in the roofing industry. You never know when the last guy you worked for will call you up for help or vice versa.


#14

If the boss knows, you’re not stealing from him. My frustration lies with this. As long as customers know that they can work around legitimate contractors, customers will keep the value of professional roofing down. It’s the same principle as foreigners coming in, not paying taxes, and taking over a substantial amount of our construction workforce. Point is, we are doing this to ourselves as long as it’s supported. Whoever supports it, shouldn’t complain about low ballers. And if you run a legite business, there is absolutley no way you can alwqays be the cheap guy and stay alive. It’s just not there. What would it look like if we were able to raise the roofing industry as a whole, actually be close to being low bid, and still be able to run a profiting business?


#15

[quote="-Axiom-"]I did side jobs while I worked for others, they never had a problem with it.
My men have done side jobs while working for me, I let them use all my tools.

If they want to do some honest work on their days off because they want or need more money, more power to them.

To call it stealing is a monumental leap.
Convoluted logic is used to justify this monumental leap.[/quote]

I agree. And unless you’ve made your roofers sign a no-compete contract, as long as they aren’t stealing your leads or materials it should all be good.


#16

I dont care if guys do a side-job and ask me if they can use my equipment. What I do have a problem is having someone accept a sidejob while they are on the clock working for me.

The way I see it, if you got the lead because you put your own name out there. Then Fine. If you get the job because someone came on my jobsite and asked for contact information and you gave them your own to do it as a side job, then there is a problem.


#17

I agree with bam. Don’t mess with my customers or your fired. However i can think of 2 instances off the top of my head where an employee of mine got a side job and I helped him. I take a small pay cut and he takes a pay raise. I let them use tools and even my dump trailer once. If you break a tool you buy it, but that goes without saying. My only stipulation is that it cannot take away from their day job. What they do with their own time is their business.

As far as driving the price of roofing down-here is something to consider: there are a lot of people out there who need roofs or repairs that simply cannot afford it from a legitimate contractor. Their options are:

  1. do it themselves, which can be dangerous and often results in more trouble than its worth
  2. hire their brother-in-law the roofer to do it when he has time and give him some cash.

This is just the way the world works. The people who are hiring guys on the side through a friend of a friend can’t afford a legitimate contractors prices, and most legitimate contractors can’t make a living for what these people can afford. I don’t think they should have to live in squalor because of that.

There’s plenty of customers out there who will pay for a job well done and piece of mind.


#18

Sorry, thats PEACE of mind.


#19

its obvious that the difference between stealing, and not stealing is:

NOT stealing: ASKING your bosses permission, and getting the lead totally from your own sources. possibly even allowing your boss to make a few bucks off of your job.

Stealing: taking a job that could have been, or should have been a lead for the company, and doing it on, or off company time (doesnt matter) using company tools, and possibly materials, and hiding it all from your boss. if ANY of those things are happening, its stealing. period.


#20

i’d like to think that, I pay my guys enough, and my guys are well rested after a hard weeks work, and can live a comfortable life style without saturdays or sundays, and can have a family life. It kills me when I find out that one of my guys worked all weekend somewhere else, for less money than I might have paid him, If he asked me for work…I know a guy that runs two shops, and he has guys that work 60-70 hours a week for him, one shop or the other…avoids overtime, but seems dicey to me…When I get in the hole financially…I’ll work sun up til dark thirty 7 days a week until I get caught up, but asking my guys for more than 8 hours of hard work a day ain’t in me…If they ask…that’s another story…I’ll always find something for them to do…