Single locks in gutters


#1

You guys make your bends with tongs or a trowel and hammer? Ever tried double locking box gutters?


#2

Hi,

Tongs


#3

I can double lock box gutters bending the high side 1 1/4 and the low and 1 than bending it all back down its a little laborsome though and I can’t see it in practice for box gutters. I’ve been really working on tin ideas a lot lately that’s why so many posts about it sorry guys shingling bores me to death anymore and at least tinwork is challenging. I noticed that I can fold the single locks really tight if I use a trowel and form the folds first beating them down this makes them really sharp as opposed to tongs although I hear that the stortz tongs have really sharp edges that bend sharp joints most tongs round them off and it takes more to bang them down


#4

Only thing I double lock is standing seam. Built in type gutters get a single, pre-tinned lock…then soldered with high heat to suck solder into the seams and then stitched. No reason to make anything harder than it is imo. If your locks are not coming out nice with tongs then try a rubber mallet for finish work. You can also lay a wood block in the gutter and beat it with a hammer, which works well with corners…


#5

I start them with a dead blow than tap the rounded part of the fold out with a ball peen. I hear a lot about stitching what is this technique? I put the majority of my iron on the high side and when I see it start puddling I start going (seeing it run out seams full)


#6

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7436/img_1236774345.jpg
The only place I do the double fold is the verticals. As on the back of this skylite. I also do this on flat-lock roofs when doing wall areas.
Ny doing so, it’s almost possible to completely seal it off by soldering the corner and bottom only. Almost!
Think about it. The dbl-lock is nearly watertight. Draw that solder up the backside and it’s sealed. Finish soldering the fold and it should last.

Here’s an old flat-lock of mine.
http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7436/img_1236774758.jpg

You can’t see it, but the vertical is double-locked. The flat is single. The only solder in front of the seam is what ran out during the process.


#7

I think a couple of you may be confused about what exactly constitutes a single or double lock system…

“Stitching” is when you drag the solder/iron tip back and forth across the seam. Leaving around 1/2"-3/4" an inch of solder on either side of the seam you’re closing. The process is a little different depending on if you are using an open flame or an iron. IMO it looks nicer and it seems to make for a more durable joint than just a flat, uniform solder seal. I know many people that return to fix cracked solder joints; maybe because they don’t pre-tin, maybe because they don’t stitch, all I know is that I am not among those making return calls to repair my own work. It’s something I picked up from an older Polish guy.


#8

I know what a double lock is just folded over one more time usually on sides of corners I needed them to hold my miters tight. Just was asking tar monkey of stitched the verticals works great I wouldn’t stitch flats though their kinda thick
…Stitching looks a lot more like welds hehe…yeah for sure on pretinning I don’t think its worth the risk of not doing it. Also what else would you do with all the 1" pieces of solder you have laying around