Should I trust this roofer?


#1

ork suburban area and is it a good idea to replace shingles in the middle of the roof like that? I’m finding it hard to believe anything he’s telling me now because I feel he just agreed to the 6’ to persuade me to sign the contract and thought I wouldn’t notice.


#2

What are you talking about?


#3

sorry- I’m new at this and half the message didn’t get sent. I’ll try again- a roofer changed his proposal from 2.5 feet of ice and snow shield to 6’ to match what 2 other contractors had quoted. But they are only putting up 3’. He says they can take off the middle shingles and add 3 more feet.Is 2.5’ enough and is replacing a good option? I don’t know what to believe now.


#4

Sounds like he broke your trust already. Maybe there was some mis-communication between the owner and his crew. He is willing to fix the ‘mistake’.

How did you find out there isn’t 6’ of I&W?

Its hard to give a good opinion on trusting someone on limited info. Doesn’t look good so far.


#5

The Ice & water shield is supposed to extend 2’ beyond the interior wall line of your house, this generally takes a minimum of 4 1/2’.
Some homes require much more, I can’t think of a good reason to use just 2 1/2’, the rolls are 3’ wide…

More information is needed here.
Do you live in a cold climate?
Do you have icicles?
If so, how big are they?

Let’s start here.
The collective knowledge/experience here has the right answer for you.


#6

I think he said 2.5’ up the roof because the rest of it is extending down behind the gutter? we live in suburbs of NYC and have had icicles some winters and water coming into the house through window frames. he said they can take off the shingles in the middle of the roof to add 3 more feet, but wouldn’t that cause more problems?


#7

No, it will not cause more problems, it is an easy thing to do.

Is it needed?
That is the question.
If they are going to do this at no extra cost, have them do it.

Ice & water shield on the eaves is really just extra protection against poor ventilation.
If you have good ventilation, you don’t need Ice & water shield on the eaves at all.
It is required by code in most areas though…

If the roofer brought this up and offered the fix, you should probably have it done.
Taking for granted that the roofer knows what he is doing.
Perhaps he feels this is needed and was overlooked by his crew, who knows.

If the roofer is going to charge for this, many more questions arise…


#8

They left the roof without shingles on it overnight one day and I came home during the day one day and saw the different layers- ice shield and roof felt and asked the workers who said 3’.
The owner isn’t on site, but I don’t know how the workers would put up only 3’ unless that’s the norm for them and if so, shouldn’t he have told them to do 6’ this time?
He is offering to take off the middle shingles and put the ice shield on as per contract, but he knows I’m going away and I’ve lost trust in him. what’s the best thing to do?


#9

To go against what every manufacturer is trying to sell you, and what most contractors are trying to tell you, ice dams and the damage they cause are from heat loss.
Adding Ice and Water Shield and ridge vent sound good. But find the source of the problem first.
Signed,
The Man in the Wilderness


#10

Have them take a picture to prove that the additional Ice & water shield was applied.

Once it is done there is no easy way to verify it.
You could look at the shingles 6’ - 7’ up the roof and look for removed /replaced nails.
This would indicate a “tie in”.
It is not something I wouldn’t expect someone outside the trade to be able to recognize.


#11

thanks so much all of you for your advice. I really appreciate it. It’s so hard as a woman to deal with contractors when you don’t know anything about the job. He has references, no complaints with Better Business etc, answered all my questions politely and quickly, so I was pretty shocked when this happened. I guess I will ask them for a photo proof.
Thank you.


#12

We always do six feet of I&W as well as in the valleys under flashing and a 18"strip on rakes. 3’not code in Massachusetts. Ventilation or not you still should have it, ventilation some guys will use it as a buzz word for every single situation.True It will reduce the threat of the amount of ice damming you get if you have a cold roof deck from balanced attic ventilation but when you get wacked with multiple snow storms followed by rain all roofs can have issues.Thats is why Ice shield is now code.


#13

All these guys make excellent points regarding ice shield protection. However none managed to touch on the importance of adequate ventilation. Did the contractor install a ridge vent at the peak? If so, did he install vents on the soffits, or underside of the eave of your home? In order for a shingle manufacturer, to honor their 30 yr, or 50 yr warranties, there must be adequate ventilation. Most require at least 50% of the open space to be intake at the eaves. The rest exhaust on the peak. This is very important to maximize the life of your roof, which I’m sure was quite an investment.


#14

I will agree to the importance of adequate and balanced ventilation for your roof system. However this is a post on contract interpretation and ice & water shield application.There are several other posts that touch on proper attic ventilation.

This is situation that took 1 of 2 turns.

  1. When estimator agreed to apply an extra row of ice & water shield he didn’t notate it on the contract or the installation crew didn’t get the memo and the norm may be 1 layer .

  2. They hoped you weren’t looking. Either way the contractor needs to be held accountable for the mistake. The expense is on his dime not yours.

If icicles at your eaves has been a constant problem your insulation situation may need to be addressed. Contact a reputable professional for a consultation.


#15

Could be a common mis-communication with the owner and his crew. Not that big of a deal. It is an easy fix and I’m sure he’ll do it without incident. Six feet of Ice and water shield should be pretty common in your area, after all N.Y. can get pretty icy. I like the idea of having his crew take some pics of the repair in progress. It will put your mind at ease at a minimum and help assure it is done right. He should not have a problem with this and both paries will be satisfied in the end.


#16

Good point Roofer J. I should’ve said “Almost always”.
Seems like some of the repair work we do involves replacing sheeting ( lots of it) and fixing the insulation. A lot of these trouble prone, damaged roofs we are replacing pretty much got the 20 yrs out of 'em. 15 + anyway. However, to have to replace the decking and shim the rafters too??? Fix the drywall and insulation. Paint… again. That is illogical and that is the TRUE damage being done— not whether the shingles last 14 yrs instead of 19.
Patching this w/ I&W & ridge vent is treating the symptom and not the disease and I’ll see you again in 12 yrs. if that is what you want.
What did you say your last heating bill cost you? How much for A/C in the summer?
Oh well Americans will spend more for cable TV than their roof and structure. So what do I care?