Shingles, lower slope overlap those on high slope in valley


#1

Can anyone tell me if these shingles have been installed incorrectly? It seems that water coming down off the high slope could potentially run underneath the shingles on the lower slope? Shouldn’t the shingles have been installed with the higher slope overlapping the lower? How much could this potentially cost to remedy? Seems like it could get expensive if a lot of the shingles have to be ripped off and re-done the right way.

Thank you for any advice.

http://www.roofing.com/gallery/albums/userpics/23005/valley.jpg


#2

I leave it .

I have seen many like this without any problems .

altough is good practice to shingle the lower side in first

If it becomes a problem then redo-it

i dont believe in “fixing small areas”


#3

Hi,

The bigger problem is the shingles cut tight in the valley.

They should be up 2". That would be the only thing that I would fix.

Water hits both sides of the valley. This will minimize the effects of installing the valley this way. The shingles being cut tight will hold water under the shingles. This is a big potential for future leaks. With the shingles up 2" out of the valley, the water will drain faster.


#4

I agree with lefty. That cut is mighty close to center. Aside from that all looks normal. It is the way i would do it except the tight cut in the valley.


#5

Thanks for the advice, I appreciate it. I altered the image to make sure I understand what you meant. By no means to scale, the red line would represent the 2" out from the center of the valley where more shingles were to be added out to and then the other side of the valley would be duped the same way?

Thanks.

http://www.roofing.com/gallery/albums/userpics/23005/valley2.JPG


#6

Hi,

quote]Shouldn’t the shingles have been installed with the higher slope overlapping the lower? How much could

You were right with this. Your altered picture is correct.

No shingles need to be added. They already run under the other shingles. The 2" need to be cut out that is all.


#7

Yes it is wrong to have the cut on that side. I also dont like there sloppy ridge vent job.


#8

Who did the shingle installation? Looks to be about an 8:12 to me, but the angle is somewhat decieving…

I don’t like your photo(s) for a few reasons:

  1. Valley does need to be cut to the high side.
    a. So the higher volume of water will not run up under the shingles on the ridge line we see.
  2. If you were to cut back the additional 2" off the valley center, this could be a problem due to the shingles underneath - how far do they extend under the L side of your valley? (with the R side being the high side).

Do you know why the installer didn’t put ridge venting almost all the way down the ridgeline to the valley?


#9

it is wrong…however, i have seen a million times worse. i have seen roofs like this that have never had problems. it all depends on the details that you cant see (shingle underlap in valley).


#10

Heck, Marshall, it’s stuff like this that has us wondering if they even used the right valley product or even valley all the way up the slope vs. just ‘faking it’ with a short 5’ of metal to show something poking out the bottom.

…Or nails in the center of the valley.

…Or a minimum of 4 nails per shingle.

…Or nails in “range” of the nail line.


#11

When the shingle from the higher slope under the shingle from the lower slope going( 6 inches), you have not problems with water or leaks.


#12

Not trying to hijack a post but , went to your web site ,man you & company do great work in all roofing material’s keep up the great work


#13

uh exscuse me fellas,
roofing god here.

the taller side usually goes over the smaller doormer,
unless,
ah ha!
precisely.
unless the smaller/lower side is steeper in pitch, then it must go over.

i have spoken.

gweedo.


#14

As it is, from the photo it appears that both slopes are similar however we can’t be 100% sure due to the angle of the picture.

However if the higher of the two slopes is much larger in the volume of water it would shed towards the lower / potentially steeper dormer, then the high side should carry the cut (which is opposite of our provided photo).

I have listened.


#15

Here is another image that might help show the angles a little better.

http://www.roofing.com/gallery/albums/userpics/23005/roof2.jpg


#16

The cut is backwards, they should have cut the main deck, not the dormer. I would change it. People who say a dead center cut will leak don’t know how to crop cut their valleys. Dead center cuts look best IMO.

**“the taller side usually goes over the smaller doormer,
unless,
ah ha!
precisely.
unless the smaller/lower side is steeper in pitch, then it must go over.” **

This stands as a general rule but you need to use your own judgement too! In this case there is 10X the amount of water coming off the main deck so even if that small dormer is steeper I’d still cut the main.


#17

funny how my roofing god knowledge, is a general rule.

it does look backwards , but can still work.
ive seen em work.

gweedo