Shingle tear off and asbestos


#1

What are the risks associated with asbestos for house built in the early 80’s? Is there a way to tell if the shingles have asbestos in them? I also heard that felt paper had asbestos in the past. Is this a concern for houses in the 80’s?

I would think this would be a huge concern as a lot of these houses are having their roofs replaced.


#2

The EPA does not regulate asbestos removal on Residential properties, but on Commercial, it is regulated.

Contents are still to be properly bagged and taken to a dump site that will accept it, but they don’t charge much more if any for the weight.

I believe that roofing materials stopped using the mass quantities of asbestos fibers around 1978-ish.

Samples should be taken and sent into a laboratory to be tested to see if they are friable.

Tyvec full body suits and a Heps respirator should be worn for safety and the debris should be misted down or sprinkled to keep the air-borne contents from travelling.

Contact the EPA for further official information.

Ed


#3

Here in Ohio a person must be licensed with the EPA in order to even touch asbestos. A company that I used to work for got busted for removing asbestos roofing without being properly licensed with the EPA. The crew had dust masks, gloves, bagged the debris, and even wetted it down periodically to keep the dust down. The EPA fined them 25K dollars.

SO BE CAREFUL!


#4

stop watchin 20/20 documentrys on asbestos.

gweedo.


#5

[quote=“MAYNIAC”]Here in Ohio a person must be licensed with the EPA in order to even touch asbestos. A company that I used to work for got busted for removing asbestos roofing without being properly licensed with the EPA. The crew had dust masks, gloves, bagged the debris, and even wetted it down periodically to keep the dust down. The EPA fined them 25K dollars.

SO BE CAREFUL![/quote]

Was it a Residential Job or a Commercial Job?

The same rules do not apply for Residential per the EPA in Illinois.

Ed


#6

Is there a way to tell if the roofing product has asbestos? You can’t test every roof. My main concern is roofing felt.


#7

By sending it in to a laboratory and spending about $ 75.00 for the results.

Ed


#8

Here is a response about Asbestos and being unsure as an answer to a similar question posed on a home inspector site I frequent, called www.nachi.org

“What may be asbestos was visible on the boiler pipes. It appears to be friable, and, if it is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend having the material tested at a qualified laboratory.”

“Probably but only testing can make sure.”

“Having played the roll of both lead and asbestos abatement workers, I would have always err on the side of caution. Treat it as dangerous, till told (by a competent lab/etc.) otherwise.”

Do not take the potential lightly. It would be well worth finding out the procedures in your area on how to safely retrieve several test samples and have the customer pay the bill to know for sure. It is not something you get a home testing kit from the local drug store. It can possibly be life or health threatening.

Others who take it lightly have little regard for all of the victims who already have suffered.

Ed


#9

[Exterior walls] were covered with shingles of a type which has a high probability of containing asbestos. Confirmation of the presence of asbestos in the shingle material will require analysis by a qualified laboratory.

Asbestos siding may not necessarily present a health problem to the occupants of a house. Shingles are brittle and can be broken, split, or damaged. Repairs may be made by replacing asbestos shingles with cement shingles lacking the asbestos binder. To improve the appearance of cement or asbestos shingles, power wash, caulk at windows, doors, edges, etc. and repaint. If there is any question about the safety of the siding you should contact a qualified asbestos abatement contractor.

Generally, asbestos containing materials do not have to be removed from any residential property. In fact, asbestos containing material does not have to be removed from any residential structure unless it will be disturbed during renovations or demolition activities.

As long as the asbestos containing material is in good condition, intact and will not be disturbed, it does not pose a significant health risk. The only time an issue should be made of asbestos is when it’s exposed and friable, flaking or crumbling, and that it’s likely to become airborne.

Removal should never be attempted by the homeowner.
This action requires special equipment and detailed training, and is the last choice among alternatives because it poses the most risk of fiber release if not done properly. If removal is necessary it should be determined and performed by a qualified asbestos removal contractor.

Don’t panic and walk away from the purchase of a good home, just because it might have some asbestos containing material in it. Educate yourself about the asbestos issues. There are many sources of information available: the library, the internet, government agencies, and asbestos abatement contractors are a few. There are two primary methods of dealing with asbestos containing material: Encapsulation (seal it in place) and Abatement (remove it).

Visit: epa.gov/asbestos/

Ed


#10

Here is an additional supplement to the previous information from a fellow poster at that site.

Ed

Quote: Marcel R. Cyr

A little description of what is required for Homeowners attempting to remove asbestos siding or roofing materials.

Asbestos Siding and Roofing Removal Guidelines

for Homeowners

General
Based on a number of health studies, the inhalation of asbestos fibers is known to cause several respiratory diseases and research shows that asbestos in any form may constitute a potential health hazard. When untouched, asbestos siding and roofing present a minimal health hazard because the asbestos fibers are bound in a cement type mixture. However, because inhalation is the exposure route of concern, it is important to prevent asbestos fibers from becoming airborne. The health hazard occurs when the siding or roofing is drilled, sawed, sanded, or broken and the fibers are released to the air.

The removal of siding and roofing can be legally performed by home owners, general contractors, or licensed abatement contractors as long as each does not violate the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and work complies with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations delineated in 29 CFR 1926.1101. NESHAP regulations prohibit any visible emissions of asbestos fibers. As of October 1, 1995 changes in the OSHA regulations require a “competent person” to supervise all asbestos projects and a negative initial exposure assessments must be performed before employees trained in compliance with 29 CFR 1926.1101 can perform asbestos roofing and siding work. It should be noted that if the home owner has tenants then the homeowner is responsible for occupants other than the immediate family and the same regulations that apply to contractors applies to the homeowner.

Before deciding to proceed with what is believed to be an asbestos removal project, be sure that the roofing or siding actually contains asbestos. This can be verified by sending a small sample for laboratory analysis. If the siding/roofing does contain asbestos, be sure to become fully appraised of regulatory requirements before beginning the work. If the material is or becomes friable, (meaning it can be crushed by hand pressure) then it can only be removed by a licensed abatement contractor or the home owner doing the work himself. It is important to note that even under the best circumstances these procedures can be physically demanding and potentially dangerous. Breathing through a respirator places an additional stress on the heart and lungs. Employers are required to have employees medically tested and approved by a doctor to use a negative pressure respirator. For individual homeowners it would be prudent to seek a medical opinion prior to wearing such equipment. Protective clothing can become hot and restrict motion, requiring added care to be taken when working on ladders and in high places. Eye protection may result in reduced visibility. Caution must be taken around live wiring and electrical power when using the misting (water application) techniques to prevent visible emissions of asbestos fibers.

The homeowner (or contractor removing the material) is responsible for determining the condition of the asbestos material. If the asbestos siding or roofing is “non-friable” (meaning that it cannot be crushed to powder by hand pressure), the law considers it to be a solid waste which requires special handling and can be disposed of in landfill approved for that purpose with consent of the owner/operator.

There are strict regulations governing how asbestos is to be packaged, labeled, and transported to landfills permitted to accept asbestos.

Arrangements for adhering to these provisions should be made prior to starting the job of removal.
In making a decision regarding the removal of asbestos roofing or siding, the homeowner should utilize the following tests to determine the associated health risks. If any part of the siding or roofing material can be crushed into powder by hand pressure, it is to be considered potentially dangerous. If no powder can be generated by hand pressure, the material is probably relatively safe. The removal procedure to be utilized is governed by the type and condition of the asbestos material. If there is any question as to the type of roofing material confirmation should be made by laboratory analysis.

The following strategy can be used as a guideline in developing a plan of action for removal and disposal of asbestos siding and roofing:

Obtain quotes and recommendations from at least three removal contractors for removal and disposal of the siding or roofing.

When obtaining the quotes, ask that the removal and disposal prices be listed separately in the event the homeowner wishes to do only a portion of the job himself.

The homeowner may opt to remove the material himself, if the siding and/or roofing is in good condition. If the material is found to be friable, the homeowner may still elect to do the removal work but should exercise extreme caution to minimize exposure risks.
Contact the permitted facility where you intend to dispose of the asbestos material.

Removal Procedure
The process of asbestos removal involves several steps starting with personal protection, and advancing through packaging to terminal disposal. The basic steps are as follows:

Protective clothing, eye protection, and respiratory protection should be used by persons involved in asbestos removal activity. If disposable clothing such as a tyvek suit is used, it should be treated as asbestos containing waste when disposed. If medically fit, at a minimum a half-face air purifying respirator approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and equipped with High Efficiency Particulate Air filter (HEPA-type) asbestos cartridges should be worn. A dust mask does not offer adequate protection.

For commercial projects the use of barrier tape is required. For residential work performed by homeowners, the use of barrier tape is strongly recommended if in a congested area with little space between houses.

The use of plastic barriers over windows, doors, vents, etc…, would depend on the final disposition of the structure from which the material was being removed. If the building was inhabited, or going to be inhabited, the use of barriers might prove to be a good approach to fiber control. For an unoccupied, uninhabited structure it would not be necessary.
Place polyethylene on the ground surrounding the building to catch small pieces inadvertently broken off siding or shingles as they are removed. The Air Resources Division of the Department of Environmental Services recommends 10% as the maximum allowed breakage factor.

Start removal at the top and work down the sides of the building. In this manner, nail holes are exposed and nail heads can sometimes be pinched off to facilitate removal of shingles.

The removal methodology should utilize wetting techniques (misting) to minimize dust and fiber migration. This can be done effectively by adding 1 oz. of dish detergent to 1 gallon of water and applying the mix with a garden sprayer. Caution must be taken when misting in the vicinity of live electrical wiring.

Carefully remove the siding or roofing and gently place the material into double layered 6 mil thick polyethylene bags, or double lined cardboard drums or containers. The name of the generator and address at which the waste was generated must appear on each disposal container.

Wash off tools when the job is completed, restricting runoff to the immediate site.

Mist the polyethylene on the ground and carefully put it into the containers.

Dispose of material at a permitted landfill. REMEMBER: landfills approved for disposal of asbestos require 24 hours advance notice to properly handle the waste. Waste shipment records (WSR) are required by landfills and a respirator should be worn when handling asbestos waste.

The homeowner (or contractor removing the material) is responsible for safely transporting the securely packaged asbestos waste to a permitted landfill.
In summary, there are three major responsibilities that the homeowner accepts when doing the work himself:

Responsibility for the determination that the asbestos material is friable or non-friable.
Responsibility for the description of removal procedures, as necessary, to town authorities.
Responsibility for proper removal, transportation, and disposal of asbestos material.


#11

One more portion of valuable information from the same poster.

Ed

Quote: Marcel Cyr

Asbestos
Environmental
Fact Sheet

Print Version

ASB-91996

Asbestos Siding and Roofing Removal Guidelines
for Homeowners

General
Based on a number of health studies, the inhalation of asbestos fibers is known to cause several respiratory diseases and research shows that asbestos in any form may constitute a potential health hazard. When untouched, asbestos siding and roofing present a minimal health hazard because the asbestos fibers are bound in a cement type mixture. However, because inhalation is the exposure route of concern, it is important to prevent asbestos fibers from becoming airborne. The health hazard occurs when the siding or roofing is drilled, sawed, sanded, or broken and the fibers are released to the air.

The removal of siding and roofing can be legally performed by home owners, general contractors, or licensed abatement contractors as long as each does not violate the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and work complies with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations delineated in 29 CFR 1926.1101. NESHAP regulations prohibit any visible emissions of asbestos fibers. As of October 1, 1995 changes in the OSHA regulations require a “competent person” to supervise all asbestos projects and a negative initial exposure assessments must be performed before employees trained in compliance with 29 CFR 1926.1101 can perform asbestos roofing and siding work. It should be noted that if the home owner has tenants then the homeowner is responsible for occupants other than the immediate family and the same regulations that apply to contractors applies to the homeowner. Asbestos projects must be performed in a manner which conforms to the New Hampshire Solid Waste Rules.

Before deciding to proceed with what is believed to be an asbestos removal project, be sure that the roofing or siding actually contains asbestos. This can be verified by sending a small sample for laboratory analysis. If the siding/roofing does contain asbestos, be sure to become fully appraised of regulatory requirements before beginning the work. If the material is or becomes friable, (meaning it can be crushed by hand pressure) then it can only be removed by a licensed abatement contractor or the home owner doing the work himself. It is important to note that even under the best circumstances these procedures can be physically demanding and potentially dangerous. Breathing through a respirator places an additional stress on the heart and lungs. Employers are required to have employees medically tested and approved by a doctor to use a negative pressure respirator. For individual homeowners it would be prudent to seek a medical opinion prior to wearing such equipment. Protective clothing can become hot and restrict motion, requiring added care to be taken when working on ladders and in high places. Eye protection may result in reduced visibility. Caution must be taken around live wiring and electrical power when using the misting (water application) techniques to prevent visible emissions of asbestos fibers.

The homeowner (or contractor removing the material) is responsible for determining the condition of the asbestos material. If the asbestos siding or roofing is “non-friable” (meaning that it cannot be crushed to powder by hand pressure), the law considers it to be a solid waste which requires special handling and can be disposed of in landfill approved for that purpose with consent of the owner/operator. The asbestos wastes may not be placed in demolition landfills or “brush and stump” areas in the State of N.H.

There are strict regulations governing how asbestos is to be packaged, labeled, and transported to landfills permitted to accept asbestos (see Fact Sheet ASB-13). Arrangements for adhering to these provisions should be made prior to starting the job of removal.

In making a decision regarding the removal of asbestos roofing or siding, the homeowner should utilize the following tests to determine the associated health risks. If any part of the siding or roofing material can be crushed into powder by hand pressure, it is to be considered potentially dangerous. If no powder can be generated by hand pressure, the material is probably relatively safe. The removal procedure to be utilized is governed by the type and condition of the asbestos material. If there is any question as to the type of roofing material confirmation should be made by laboratory analysis.

The following strategy can be used as a guideline in developing a plan of action for removal and disposal of asbestos siding and roofing:

Obtain quotes and recommendations from at least three removal contractors for removal and disposal of the siding or roofing.

When obtaining the quotes, ask that the removal and disposal prices be listed separately in the event the homeowner wishes to do only a portion of the job himself.

The homeowner may opt to remove the material himself, if the siding and/or roofing is in good condition. If the material is found to be friable, the homeowner may still elect to do the removal work but should exercise extreme caution to minimize exposure risks.
Contact the permitted facility where you intend to dispose of the asbestos material. (See Fact Sheet ASB-14 which lists all facilities permitted to receive asbestos for disposal.)

Marcel


#12

holy BS batman. dont sweat it buddy shingle underlayment felts from the 1980s did not contain asbestos. the old asbestos felts were heavy felts used for flashing on bur"tar&gravel" roofs. the shingles that had it way back when were fiber cement “transite”.your fine


#13

And some more information:

Ed

Quote: Marcel Cyr

A little added info;

Asbestos, the very name makes many people nervous. It’s a hazardous material that can kill; who wants a home with asbestos in or on it?

There is no doubt that asbestos is a hazardous material and can cause certain types of lung cancer; however, like most environmental health issues, a lack of knowledge can cause undo concern in some cases. Over the years we have often had to answer questions and concerns regarding asbestos containing materials found both on the exterior and interior of the home. In this news letter we will be addressing one of those materials found on the exterior of the home, and try to provide answers to the most common questions we are asked.
ASBESTOS-CEMENT SIDING

A little history:
Asbestos-cement products could be found in the U.S. from about the 1920’s on. Around 1940 a construction boom was underway and the use of asbestos-cement in building products boomed as well. Far from the feared health risk some see it today, it was celebrated as a kind of miracle material. It could be produced to look like wood for siding and roofing homes, therefore just as attractive. However, it was fireproof and termite proof, where as wood is not. Because of this, the view point of that time was, a home with asbestos-cement siding or roofing shingles was considered safer than a home with wood. Sales did well, about a billion sq. ft. produced for building materials by the 1950’s

THE DEATH OF ASBESTOS-CEMENT SIDING PRODUCTION:

In 1970 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established. Use of asbestos-cement products, including siding and roofing, continued to grow for another three years. Production and sales came to a crashing halt when the EPA implemented the first ban on asbestos in 1973.

Once celebrated as a wonder material, making homes safer from fire, wood destroying insects and rot; asbestos was now considered a hazardous material.

ASBESTOS-CEMENT SIDING & ROOFING - A HAZARD?
The EPA defines an asbestos containing material as a potential hazard when it becomes “friable.” Friable means the asbestos containing material can be crumbled, pulverized, or reduced to powder by hand pressure. In this condition, the asbestos fibers can be released into the air and breathed in, which of course is the hazard to our health.

With any asbestos containing material, the EPA recommends that if it is in good condition (not friable), the best thing to do is to LEAVE IT ALONE. Removing or covering it creates a greater potential for the release of asbestos than leaving it untouched when in good condition.

The fortunate thing about asbestos-cement products like siding and roofing shingles, is that it is typically not in a friable condition. The cement binds the asbestos fibers together and prevents release of the asbestos. This is not to say asbestos-cement products cannot be a hazard. It can become a hazard if severe deterioration disturbs the asbestos. Improper handling such as chipping, grinding, sawing, scrapping, or sanding can also release asbestos, creating a hazard.

So what do you do if you have damaged asbestos-cement siding or roofing and you want to repair it, or side over it, or re-roof your home?

PAINTING:
Hairline cracks can often be repaired by inserting a clear epoxy into the crack. Epoxy will not last for ever. Over time it will loose its effectiveness due to Ultra Violet Rays. For cracks that are a little larger, portland cement mixed to a flowing consistency is recommended.

REPAIR:
Hairline cracks can often be repaired by working a clear epoxy into the crack Epoxy will not last for ever. Over time it will loose its effectiveness due to UV. For cracks that are a little larger, portland cement mixed to a flowing consistency is recommended.
When the siding is actually broken and pieces are missing, then the damaged sections should be replaced (see below for disposal of damaged sections). Since asbestos-cement is no longer manufactured in the U.S. a substitute must be found. According to an article provided to us by both the EPA and the CT Dept. of Public Health, some materials have been manufactured to replicate asbestos-cement building components such as non-asbestos reinforced cement, fiberboard with asphalt, metal and vinyl. However, we do not believe these are easily found and some searching may be required.

SIDING OVER ASBESTOS-CEMENT SIDING WITH VINYL:
You are allowed to side over asbestos-cement siding, it does not have to be removed. Remember, removal is the last option because this is where the greatest potential to create a hazard exists. A covering of insulation board should be applied first, than the vinyl siding can be installed over

Sometimes removal of asbestos-cement products are necessary. While siding over asbestos-cement siding is preferred there may be times when its removal is warranted. Asbestos roof shingles should not be roofed over. When it is time to re-roof, the asbestos-cement shingles will have to be carefully and properly removed and disposed of.

The Federal government has no regulations on this subject. The State of Connecticut has no laws prohibiting a homeowner or general contractor from removing asbestos-cement siding or roofing as long as they follow these provisions:

The asbestos-cement material must be disposed as asbestos waste. Waste must be adequately wet, double bagged, labeled with generator name (person doing the removal), and site address. A licensed waste hauler must be used to haul the asbestos. All asbestos waste is sent out of the state.

Power tools cannot be used – because no cutting, sanding, abrading is permitted.

A layer of 6-mil polyethylene sheeting should be installed or placed on the ground around the foundation of the building, so that when pieces fall, you will not have to remove soil, just roll up the poly, to contain the asbestos.

When removing material higher than 15 ft. A chute must be used which is terminated at a covered waste trailer.

The Marvin H. Schaefer Inspection Service is providing this information in hopes of answering the many questions we have received over the years concerning asbestos-cement material. This does not mean we are endorsing the use of these methods to anyone who is not skilled enough to handle this material properly. We cannot determine your own skill level; therefore if you decide to implement any methods mentioned in this newsletter, you do so at your own risk.

WARNING:

This newsletter contains information provided by government agencies such as the EPA and the CT Dept. of Public Health.

It was represented to us by an EPA official that there are no Federal laws concerning removal or maintenance of asbestos-cement material. Because of this we were refereed to the CT. Dept. of Public Heath. They indicated to us that home owners can repair, or remove asbestos-cement material provided certain safety precautions are applied. There are however, State regulations for the disposal of this material (see above).

Although the public may perform these home repairs and improvements, it should be understood that some risk is involved. If you are not absolutely sure you are able to perform these activities safely, you should contact a qualified professional to do them for you.The information contained on this page is not exhaustive and is meant to be only an overview. For complete documentation on this subject please contact local or State heath officials.

I installed and repaired all kinds of this siding when a kid working with my father, he died of a stroke at 60 with a heart an lung stronger than a horse and I am still alive.

We are here to recognize the hazard and to make sure that we do not condone it’s removal or handling by the potential buyers of property that may contain such material.

At best, it would be wise to always advise Clients to encapsulate or have it professionally removed.
As far as Contractors installing vinyl siding over it, we can always hope they have been educated in it’s matrix and hazard to comply with OSHA regulations.

Hope this helps some.

Marcel


#14

By the way, I am posting all of this information just so people can get more familiar with the rules and regulations regarding asbestos, not so much for this OP.

It may come in handy some day.

Ed

So, as my final note on this topic:

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussell
I think I would be more concerned with the installation of fiber cement siding, which is used quite often now, than installing vinyl over asbestos.

You are correct Peter;

**Since most Contractors in the Residential Arena are not quite informed on safety procedures as should be, the hazards of working with this Product surely exist. **

Actual lung injury from acute exposure is rare but possible.

**Chronic inhalation from cutting and sawing of this material repeatedly or prolonged overexposures to dust containing crystalline Silica may result in chest pain, difficulty breathing, lung damage and silicosis. Silicosis is the permanent deposition of Silica in lung tissue which may result in lung damage. **

There may exist a relationship between silicosis and certain cancers.

**So no matter what products we work with, just wait 30 years or so and find out if it is a hazard to our health as is asbestos. **

Kind of scary isn’t it?

Marcel


#15

The dangers of asbestos is way overblown.
This stuff is not toxic like people would have you believe.
It is a naturally occurring mineral, yes it is mined not manufactured.

The reason asbestos is demonized is that people who worked with it daily got asbestosis from inhaling the particulates.
They took no precautions against inhalation of asbestos dust.
Fiberglass isn’t much better in this respect…

That being said, it does need to be handled properly, and yes I did asbestos abatement for a few years.
We know more about asbestos now than we did 30 yrs ago, it is no longer widely used but it is still used.
As long as it is not being inhaled, asbestos is a harmless useful substance.

Adhesives and primers used in commercial roofing are far more dangerous than Asbestos, as is the fumes from hot air welding.


#16

geeze.

gweedo.