Saving Removed Shingles


#1

I’m building a new attached screen porch, and its roof will meet the house’s roof at the drip edge. Due to a very low pitch, the porch roof will have to be rubber membrane, which should go under the house’s shingles about 3’ to prevent leaks. There will be over 30’ to deal with. House pitch is 4/12.

The problem is, the house shingles are no longer made (Harbor Blue 3-tab), so I see three choices: Re-roof that slope of the house with Harbor Blue architectural (most expensive option); Re-roof as above but only the bottom 3’ (might look strange); or carefully remove the 3-tabs and re-use (risky). BTW, the shingles on this slope were all double-nailed due to bad wind exposure.

I’ve done the re-use option for small areas, but for this I’d like to have an easier method of popping the nails to reduce the chance of damaging the shingles, because I only have about 3 spare shingles left over.

I’ve thought of two improvements over the standard Wonder Bar approach. One is to use a small pneumatic grinder to grind the centers of the heads off (being careful not to grind the shingles) and lift the shingles off the nail shanks. Another is to take an old carpenter’s framing saw, grind off the teeth, and weld a hacksaw blade onto that edge. Then I could work the saw underneath the shingles and cut off the nails underneath.

Any thoughts on these ideas, or any better ideas? Thanks in advance!


#2

Even in that situation i would not reuse any used shingle.


#3

i would say new roof on that slope!


#4

Hi,

Most of the shingles would not go back in. The rubber will run up the shingle side. Leave as much of this exposed as you can.

This would allow enough shingles to reuse. If you can reuse for a small area. You can do this.


#5

Thanks all for good advice.

Lefty, I don’t quite understand. The manufacturer of the membrane says it should go about 3’ under the shingles. That means that many shingles (at least) have to be removed and replaced over the membrane. Below the “break” from 4/12 to low pitch will be just membrane over the porch. Above the break has to be shingles. Hard to describe, hope my choice of words is understandable!


#6

Hello,

You could call some of the roofing companies in your area and see if they have any bundles left over from previous jobs. We had to do that for a color that was discontinued and found what we needed plus some.

Keith


#7

Hi,

I would not put shingles all the way down. I would leave a least a 3 courses out.

I was just on one yesterday. They did what you want to do. It did not work.


#8

Well a good slate puller could get them out nice AJC makes a good one but the only problem is that once you separate the shingles, all the bonds won’t be good anymore so you’ll have ti tar them down when you reuse them


#9

take em out carfully and reinstall them.
tar the old nail holes, and the rips you make.

worse things have been done.

gweedo.


#10

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

I would not put shingles all the way down. I would leave a least a 3 courses out.

I was just on one yesterday. They did what you want to do. It did not work.[/quote]

Wow, that sure is news to me! Can you tell me why it didn’t work, what went wrong? Did it leak or what? I think it would look funny with the membrane going up the slope a ways. BTW, the membrane mfr still says to go under the shingles 3’, so I’d have to remove & replace that many more courses.


#11

[quote]="jimjomac

Wow, that sure is news to me! Can you tell me why it didn’t work, what went wrong? Did it leak or what? I think it would look funny with the membrane going up the slope a ways. BTW, the membrane mfr still says to go under the shingles 3’, so I’d have to remove & replace that many more courses.[/quote]

I do like Lefty so that my nails arent through the membrane in a possible ice dam build up area.

Yes you will have to remove more courses.


#12

Several problems with this, as I see it. One, E.P.D.M. and asphalt do not mix. The asphalt will eventually eat holes in the E.P.D.M., unless you use a separator. You can use any of the synthetic underlayments, as long as they don’t have asphalt in them. A mod bit product would work for this project. Two, if you start nailing right at the apex where the two roofs meet, it WILL leak. The nails used to hold the shingles down will perforate the membrane, and E.P.D.M., unlike your asphalt products, will split and tear away from the nail, not adhere to it.
My suggestion, if you are going to use the E.P.D.M., is to carry it through the pitch change, and up the 4/12 about three ft. Then bring the shingles (With the appropriate separator) over the top one foot of rubber. If you do it that way, it will never leak, and you will have plenty of existing shingles to work with.

Just my .02 worth,
Mike


#13

Can’t you bridge over that area where the two join by covering it with either shingle underlayment or a roll-out of either sheet metal or aluminum as a cover piece.


#14

Hi,

There is not enough asphalt in shingles to effect the edpm.


#15

[quote=“Lefty”]Hi,

There is not enough asphalt in shingles to effect the edpm.[/quote]

i agree. i actually just took apart a roof that had the same transition and the EPDM was fine after 26 years. I have pictures some where.


#16

Shingles are almost 100% asphalt. That said they have a low oil content which is what eats at the epdm. Shingles will not effect the epdm.
Stay up at least a foot from the angle change with the last course.