Salesman Needed


#1

I own a small company with little overhead. We are in desperate need of salesmen. We can’t follow up on leads we have currently and have several thousand names from local storm paths to follow up with as well. Please call me at 903-218-5207 if interested. We pay 8% of gross sales. YOu don’t even have to call insurance or put estimates into exactimate. Our secretary does that. Come be rt of a Great locally owned team!
East Texas, Ft. Smith, AR. & Tulsa, OK.
Thanks
Tim


#2

So, on a 20 square roof at 140.00 per square, the salesmans commission would be 224.00, right?

Ed


#3

No we have 250 minimums and often times I will ask the salesmen for his input, if he wants to make 400 a pop i’ll give him that option and we will raise price by 150.
most of my guys would rather have a bunch of $250’s and let the $500-800 home runs come as they may. There out there and if you don’t push for them and take the $250 as serious as the $1000 then it seems to work well.


#4

So, please run me through your typical salesman scenario for acquiring a Hail Renovation contract.

By the way, I am Not interested in the job, just so you are clear about the posts.

I am interested in finding out how and what do you say and do, that should ingratiate a home owner to sign up with your company when there are more than likely 2 dozen other contractors canvassing the same Hail Struck neighborhoods.

Also, if you were not doing Hail work, would you be at the same price levels, which seem less than 1/2 price to me, but is probably par for the course in Texas. (I’m around the Chicago area, by the way)

How does your company handle supplementals to the initial Xactimate numbers?

What do you do when the adjuster says, “Well, I Guess We Will Agree To Disagree?”

Do your salesmen estimate the roofs by measuring on the roof top or just do a ground footprint measurement?

How much time per home does a salesman have invested before the claim is signed and approved by the insurance company?

At those minimum fees, does your company still offer a “Sign” or “Cover Deductible” discount?

Also, if you would not mind sharing your version of the Agreement paperwork in private to my e-mail at eddiesdad@sbcglobal.net

Thanks,

Ed


#5

Ed,
Your wisdom shows in your questions (you probably know 95% of what i’m going to say)

No there’s not 2 dozen contractors here (about 10-12) 1/2 of which are local the rest are from Texas but some from south of the border.
We are local that helps, we do use exactimateand try and get o & p like most if not no big deal teh company tries to make 1,000 per job, not getting rich but in the long run… u don’t go broke making money

we measure roofs from the top

we bend and give with adjuster, I’ve never had a roof we couldn’t make 1k on and that suits me fine
we spend on average 1-2 hours with a customer before they sign, after that I have 2 ladies in the office in addition to myself who deal with inputting into exactimate and haggling with insurance. insurance adjusters seem to be getting better

saw one estimate from them the other day for 29% o & p they gave that to them before we became involved. I said sign em up we can make it work.

we have a $250 off coupon in paper and yes we will pay for referralls and putting sign up, bottom line, you got a $2000 deductible or more your paying for your roof out of pocket. no way around it.


#6

Thanks for the forthright answers. Yeah, I know what “Most” contractors do, but I always like to see how others shake the leaves off of the trees.

Are homes about an average of 20 squares in that area, or are their some McMansions that you are targeting?

I operate on between a 49% to 52% Gross Profit, but have a lot of overhead to be taken out before I get to the Net.

At $ 1,000.00 Profit, I am presuming you mean Gross as well. (I don’t need to know your Net)

So, on a 20 square at 140.00 per square = $2,800.00, so your just a bit above 35% to 36%.

Seems good with work flowing in volumes like that.

If I could afford a reduction in my OH, that Model would make sense to me too.

I was serious about the forms if you wouldn’t mind. If not, I understand.

Ed


#7

my pricing is this i pay my subs $35 for a tear off and reroof, dump costs me 200 bucks on a 20 sq. haven’t done many 20 sq’s or smaller avg job is 28-35. materials cost 49 sq for 3 tab 69 sq for arch.

on a 2800 job at 20 sqs (if i pay salesman 250) i make 750 ish i would probably bid this job at 3150 realistically.

email me at texasroofing@hotmail.com and I’ll send you our contract / bid form if that’s what you mean?

p.s. I was born in willoughby and much of family lives in painesville. where u work?


#8

if you email me first Ed, it’s easier on me.
thanks!


#9

Done. I was busy typing.

Ed


#10

Any salesmen finishing up their areas adn looking for new work?


#11

Ed,

Paying for deductibles even partially is illegal in Texas.

Paying for placing a sign in an insureds yard is in fact considered a rebate since the insured receive a betterment from their loss. When you submit an invoice to the insurance company to recover the depreciation do you show that you payed the insured? If you did then the insurance company would reduce the recoverable depreciation by the amount you payed.
I’m seeing language on claim summaries now that address this issue informing insureds that it’s illegal.

Now you can pay to place a sign in someones yard you are not re-roofing, that’s legal but not likely.

Since roofing is by its very nature dangerous and potentially deadly these kickbacks can be considered a first degree felony offense. At the minimum it’s a state jail felony. If you get caught doing it multiple times they will aggregate the charges.
All it takes is an insurance companies SIU to audit an insured. Or the Texas Department of Insurance to investigate. tdi.state.tx.us/fraud/index.html

See Chapter 35 Insurance Fraud Section 35.02(7)(B)

BUSINESS & COMMERCE CODE

CHAPTER 27. FRAUD

§ 27.02. CERTAIN INSURANCE CLAIMS FOR EXCESSIVE
CHARGES. (a) A person who sells goods or services commits an
offense if:
(1) the person advertises or promises to provide the
good or service and to pay:
(A) all or part of any applicable insurance
deductible; or
(B) a rebate in an amount equal to all or part of
any applicable insurance deductible;
(2) the good or service is paid for by the consumer
from proceeds of a property or casualty insurance policy; and
(3) the person knowingly charges an amount for the
good or service that exceeds the usual and customary charge by the
person for the good or service by an amount equal to or greater than
all or part of the applicable insurance deductible paid by the
person to an insurer on behalf of an insured or remitted to an
insured by the person as a rebate.
(b) A person who is insured under a property or casualty
insurance policy commits an offense if the person:
(1) submits a claim under the policy based on charges
that are in violation of Subsection (a) of this section; or
(2) knowingly allows a claim in violation of
Subsection (a) of this section to be submitted, unless the person
promptly notifies the insurer of the excessive charges.
© An offense under this section is a Class A misdemeanor.

Added by Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 898, § 1, eff.
Sept. 1, 1989.

PENAL CODE

CHAPTER 35. INSURANCE FRAUD

§ 35.02. INSURANCE FRAUD. (a) A person commits an
offense if, with intent to defraud or deceive an insurer, the
person, in support of a claim for payment under an insurance policy:
(1) prepares or causes to be prepared a statement
that:
(A) the person knows contains false or misleading
material information; and
(B) is presented to an insurer; or
(2) presents or causes to be presented to an insurer a
statement that the person knows contains false or misleading
material information.
(a-1) A person commits an offense if the person, with intent
to defraud or deceive an insurer and in support of an application
for an insurance policy:
(1) prepares or causes to be prepared a statement
that:
(A) the person knows contains false or misleading
material information; and
(B) is presented to an insurer; or
(2) presents or causes to be presented to an insurer a
statement that the person knows contains false or misleading
material information.
(b) A person commits an offense if, with intent to defraud
or deceive an insurer, the person solicits, offers, pays, or
receives a benefit in connection with the furnishing of goods or
services for which a claim for payment is submitted under an
insurance policy.
© An offense under Subsection (a) or (b) is:
(1) a Class C misdemeanor if the value of the claim is
less than $50;
(2) a Class B misdemeanor if the value of the claim is
$50 or more but less than $500;
(3) a Class A misdemeanor if the value of the claim is
$500 or more but less than $1,500;
(4) a state jail felony if the value of the claim is
$1,500 or more but less than $20,000;
(5) a felony of the third degree if the value of the
claim is $20,000 or more but less than $100,000;
(6) a felony of the second degree if the value of the
claim is $100,000 or more but less than $200,000; or
(7) a felony of the first degree if:
(A) the value of the claim is $200,000 or more; or
(B) an act committed in connection with the
commission of the offense places a person at risk of death or
serious bodily injury. (d) An offense under Subsection (a-1) is a state jail
felony. (e) The court shall order a defendant convicted of an
offense under this section to pay restitution, including court
costs and attorney’s fees, to an affected insurer.
(f) If conduct that constitutes an offense under this
section also constitutes an offense under any other law, the actor
may be prosecuted under this section, the other law, or both.
(g) For purposes of this section, if the actor proves by a
preponderance of the evidence that a portion of the claim for
payment under an insurance policy resulted from a valid loss,
injury, expense, or service covered by the policy, the value of the
claim is equal to the difference between the total claim amount and
the amount of the valid portion of the claim.
(h) If it is shown on the trial of an offense under this
section that the actor submitted a bill for goods or services in
support of a claim for payment under an insurance policy to the
insurer issuing the policy, a rebuttable presumption exists that
the actor caused the claim for payment to be prepared or presented.

Added by Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 621, § 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.
Amended by Acts 2003, 78th Leg., ch. 605, § 1, eff. Sept. 1,
2003.

Amended by:
Acts 2005, 79th Leg., Ch. 1162, § 4, eff. September 1,
2005.

§ 35.03. AGGREGATION AND MULTIPLE OFFENSES. (a) When
separate claims in violation of this chapter are communicated to an
insurer or group of insurers pursuant to one scheme or continuing
course of conduct, the conduct may be considered as one offense and
the value of the claims aggregated in determining the
classification of the offense. If claims are aggregated under this
subsection, Subsection (b) shall not apply.
(b) When three or more separate claims in violation of this
chapter are communicated to an insurer or group of insurers
pursuant to one scheme or continuing course of conduct, the conduct
may be considered as one offense, and the classification of the
offense shall be one category higher than the most serious single
offense proven from the separate claims, except that if the most
serious offense is a felony of the first degree, the offense is a
felony of the first degree. This subsection shall not be applied if
claims are aggregated under Subsection (a).

Added by Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 621, § 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995


#12

i want some of those 200k claims!


#13

the focus of my business is to get the homeowner ALL of the monies they are rightfully entitled to from the insurance claim. If they choose to use me for their roof great! If I make O & P simply because I line up all of their work that’s fine too!
case in point,
they have damaged hvac, window screens, covered porch etc.
the homeowner is entitled this money as per their coverage. for instance:
5k roof
100.00 for hvac
500.00 for screens
1250.00 for porch
total claim 6850.
deductible 500
net payment 6350
if they give me 5k for the roof and they handle the rest then it’s no case of fraud. Am i paying their deductible no not at all. they are paying it as it will cost them that to fix their screens straighten their coils etc, either in real money or in real time if they choose to do it themselves…

just my 2 cents


#14

tejaus, You are my hero.


#15

ttruman13

What you’re doing is legit. Just let the insured know that if there is another storm and they didn’t get those ancillary items repaired that they can’t claim them again and they’ll lose their depreciation. The insurance company can also cancel a policy if the underwriter feels the insured is not keeping up the place. I’ve seen it happen with roofs not getting replaced and they get put on the mortgage company’s policy which ain’t cheap.

My point is really for roofers to stop with this deductible nonsense. You have to sell on service not price. Once you start competing on price alone is a slippery slope and everyone looses. If an insured asks about helping with their deductible show them the statutes.


#16

Tejaus,

I agree with you completely and wish/hope regulations like that were truly enforced.

I was just asking the OP questions about how he or others conduct their business to get a better feel for the situation.

Welcome to the site.

Ed


#17

Any roofer should be getting at least $100 profit per square, if you are not you are in the wrong business. I have salesman making more than many roofing owners. If you know what you’re doing its pretty easy to get.

This is in Texas, don’t know if this applies anywhere else. I do know that in Texarkana the profit per square sucks.


#18

Are you doing any Houston work?

I’m here now doing a project we started bidding on two months ago (& got approved for one month ago; have been waiting on bank financing) & even on the W side of downtown, there is substantial damage.

For those who don’t know, Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown is the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the United States with a population of 5.6 million as of the 2007 U.S. Census estimate.

If only 5% of the houses here “in the area” were damaged to the point that would interest those of us who post here, that would be 280,000 roofs.


#19

Ranchrand whats with the village idiot dancing?LOL


#20

He is happy for all the work to Choose from.