Roofing felt


#1

When rolling out felt I always thought it was suppose to go up vertical surfaces 3" instead of butting against the sheathing. I was told yesterday this is unnecessary because the step or head flashing does all the work and any moisture that does get under the flashing is minimal, and if enough water is getting under the shingles and flashing where the paper is constantly wet it will rot anyway and doesn’t help the underlying problem which is usually flashing done incorrectly. Does this make sense.


#2

On a BUR, you always want to turn up and stick it directly to the wall. No step flashing.


#3

We always try to. On existing it is about impossible. Judging from what we’ve seen tearing off, this is not a big issue, altho I agree that it is correct to back up the flashing.
I’ve also thought that it is a condensation issue as the metal can get the hot from inside and the cold from outside


#4

Hi,

You are asking about new work? Unless you are doing the siding on a reroof, it is not run up the wall.

The question is do I want to have a fool proof roof. Or do I want to do just enough to get by.

If you just want to get by. Listen to that guy. He can tell you all the corners to cut.

There are alot of things I do that do not have to be done. I did not get to be the best in my area, by doing just enough to get by.


#5

if you are going to nail the flashing through the felt you have turned up the wall, then you have just made the felt worthless.
if your flashing leaks and water gets to the nails in the flashing, it wont matter how many layers of whatever is under it.
the nails are going to rust away and thats were water will enter,
through the nail holes.
i cant beleive all the mortals here think that puttin somethin
under the shingles is going to help anything.
if you did not have to nail shingles on, then maybe you would be able
to make a better roof by puttin numerous layers of peal n steal under
the shingles.
until then worry about what your doin on top of the roof, not under it.

i have spoken.

gweedo


#6

Hi Gweedo,

You do not install felt under your shingles?


#7

Hey, you guys ever use a product called feltex?
Its awesome, really light and there is tons on a roll…
its like tarp on a roll but not slippery! :!:


#8

i have found that feltex is hard to work with and sticks to itself when rolled out. for a synthetic underlayment we use titanium. both come in 10 square rolls. but be cautious as it can trap moisture under it if there is inadequit ventilation.


#9

I dont know about if he felts or not, but gweedo has admittedly cut a lot of corners, and calls it done.


#10

I’m not sure what application you’re talking about but it sounds like a pitched app with asphalt shingles at a wall junction.

IMO you should be running a full 36" of ice and water barrier onto the deck and running it a minimum of 6" up your wall. THEN butting your felt paper over that to the wall.

The importance of the different facets of a roofing project can be debated but the simple fact is that if you pay attention to the detail of ALL of them equally you will produce a superior product.


#11

Hi TarMonkey,

If you put ice and water on the wall. The felt on the deck needs to be under it.


#12

“If you put ice and water on the wall. The felt on the deck needs to be under it.”

If he’s talking about a place where an apron flashing would be appropriate then yes. I thought he was talking about where a step flashing would be used though; in which case i’d have to disagree.


#13

some people call it cuttin corners.
i call it, not doin somethin thats not needed.

and yes you can put shingles rite over plywood.
i have torn off many roofs with no felt.
and the woods just fine.

felt paper has alot of uses and purposes,
to keep water out after it gets past the shingles is not
one of them.

gweedo.


#14

Hi Tar Monkey,

We are talking about where the steps are used.

You are wrong.

The storm guard can not be attached directly to both the wall and the deck. They move different ways and times. Thus it will tear. So it needs to be over the felt on the deck. So it can move.


#15

“The storm guard can not be attached directly to both the wall and the deck. They move different ways and times. Thus it will tear. So it needs to be over the felt on the deck. So it can move.”

Ok, so we are talking specifically about GAF Stormguard now? lol.
According to the GAF field guide you’re right. But since Grace makes the best ice and water barrier I’m going to have to side with them…they say the exact opposite. Unless I’m doing a GAF Golden Pledge job I’ll have to dare to be wrong and side with Grace, heh.