Roofing cement in valley


#1

Hello,

My father and I took on a small project of roofing his small cabin over the weekend. The cabin had two very small valleys in which we overlapped the shingles and cut the top shingle - 2 inches about valley line (I believe this is a closed cut)

anyway, I took some time off and when I came back my father used roofing cement under the cut shingles. He figured this would keep water from coming in. I didn’t think this was needed and it doesn’t look the greatest with the cement coming out a little. Is this the correct procedure?

Also, the line he cut down the valley was a little crooked. What is the best way to make this cut look proper - Snap a chalk line a cut it with a utility knife!

Thanks for you advice!


#2

My father and I took on a small project of roofing his small cabin over the weekend. The cabin had two very small valleys in which we overlapped the shingles and cut the top shingle - 2 inches about valley line (I believe this is a closed cut)

Yes. Correct.

anyway, I took some time off and when I came back my father used roofing cement under the cut shingles. He figured this would keep water from coming in. I didn’t think this was needed and it doesn’t look the greatest with the cement coming out a little. Is this the correct procedure?

I wouldn’t have done it that way but I don’t see anything wrong with it either. The large draw back is that it makes it much harder to repair.

Also, the line he cut down the valley was a little crooked. What is the best way to make this cut look proper - Snap a chalk line a cut it with a utility knife!

Yes. You can use a hook type blade in a utility knife in the warm weather or a pair of large metal shears (like scissors) in the cooler weather.


#3

Hi,

Yes your father did it right.

You may want to leave the valley cuts alone. With the roof cement under the shingles, it may look worse after you cut it.
**
[size=150]Most important… Leave it alone do not say anything about the work. Except to tell your dad what a great time you had doing the roof with him.[/size]**


#4

Hi,

That is an extra charge to cemnet the valleys. The high end customers pay us for this type of craftsmanship.


#5

Roof cement and craftsmanship are words that should never be used in conjunction of one another, lol.


#6

ifin you read the wraper on a bundle it reads cement under the cut side


#7

lefty knows of what he speaks :wink:


#8

i wish lefty was my dad!!!


#9

“ifin you read the wraper on a bundle it reads cement under the cut side”

  1. Maybe I’m out of touch I haven’t read a shingle wrapper in quite a few years.

  2. I know what “ifin” means as I lived down south for almost 9 years. However i really can’t take someone seriously that would actually use it in a sentence.

  3. I must be an amazing roofer because I have for years and years laid asphalt shingle valleys that don’t leak without cementing them. (I always crop cut.)

Hey, whatever you think is best is fine. As I stated there is nothing wrong with tarring the valley. Call it good practice if you must but don’t call it craftmanship. Creating a slate spire or a true standing seam barrel roof is craftsmanship. Slinging tar I could hire a monkey to do, hence my sarcastic pseudonym. Only grade school kids consider mushing goop “crafting”, lol.


#10

everything has a place,you seem to have a high opinion of yourself,good for you


#11

hmmm…
Just replaced some asphalt shingles because the tar caused water to pond under the tar sealed laps. It ate away the felt and installed a waterfall! I guess a waterfall installed in a home is nice craftsmanship but only when it was planned. :mrgreen:


#12

“…you seem to have a high opinion of yourself,good for you”

Says the guy who named himself “god”, nice.


#13

:shock:


#14

I learned the trade to also not cement or hand seal my vallys. just dont need to. they did not use I&W when I started roofing either. just felt or roll roofing in vally, 1980s. some of the roofs I did then are still doing good. We did have a big problem in the north east with the Bird shingles class action suit.

RooferJim

www.jbennetteroofing.com