Roofers are gone, questions for you before I call them


#1
  1. There’s a lot of debris in the gutters (wood, shingle pieces, 1/4" of granular debris). Is the roofer typically responsible for this clean-up, or is this typically the home owners responsibility?

  2. Same goes for the attic. This one I assume is my responsibility. But not sure. No biggy.

  3. I can still see light around the chimney from attic. I don’t see a direct shot to sky, but I do see some light on both sides. Is that a problem, or is that something that can be seen even if the job was done right?

  4. Broken storm window. I found it. No note, or mention from them.

  5. They didn’t install a under eave vent for our bathroom exhaust. Our contract said, “I’d buy the vent they’d install”. They didn’t.

I’m fine with roofing the job they did. My real question is what items should I ask them to fix/do, and in what manner is best way to talk with them about issues. I don’t want to be difficult, just want fairness all around.

Thanks very much in advance.


#2

they should clean gutters.

typically you clean attic.

they should replace window (even if they were unaware they broke it)

talk to who ever was the salesman about bath vent (i would put it through roof not under eve. probably was a communication error)

chimney we would need to see pictures from outside.


#3

I agree with M. Attic normally gets dirty, i have never cleaned one out for a customer since notne have complained. Chimney if you can get on the roof please post some pics. Altho i have cleaned a garage out for a lady. Funny story she called the city since she thought we did something wrong and well she had a dozen code violations on her property but nothing wrong with the roof we just laid. Funny if you ask me.


#4

they should have cleaned the gutters.

If you can see light around the chimney then that is not good. Post a picture for us to see.


#5

In my estimate it includes gutters to be cleaned. It would be safe to say we clean out more stuff thats been in the gutters prior to working than what fell into the gutters while on site.

Never cleaned an attic but the only time it would get diry is on old space sheathing roofs. Certainteed says the best way to approach the situation is to put down canvas tarps in the attic prior to ripping. It’s not a bad idea.

The light comming in from the chimney sounds like a problem if it rains were your house is.

You should confront the contractor in regards to the broken storm window.

You should have the contractor stop by to show them the issues you have in a polite manner.


#6

Thanks all very much for your replies. I’ll have them back to look at the chimney. In my first post, I said light was coming in both sides. Turns our the left side (once I got a flashlight up there) was just light shinning though a rubber membrane. But the right side does have daylight see upper right from inside. Hard to shoot. Here’s the best I could do. And I couldn’t get to the chimney this morning all the way (shot from a lower roof), couldn’t shoot above, or view of top. Thanks again–Peter

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227445364.jpg

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227445413.jpg

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227445430.jpg

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227445447.jpg


#7

Marshall and Dougger hit on the other points correctly.

The flashing looks very poor. It is not mortared or caulked in at the joints.

Also, the photo revealing the light seems to depict the front left corner where the folded lap does not cover the front lower base flashing enough.

Also, it looks like they used a one piece system and al flashings are supposed to be two pieces when done properly.

Lower Side:
Base front apron flashing with a counter-flashing on top.

Left and Right Sides:
Step flashing baby tins first and then a counter-flashing on top.

Rear Top Side:
Pan Apron Style Flashing with a Counter-Flashing on top.

It will leak from a wind driven rain.

Ed


#8

I should point out that this is the old flashing material that they worked with, not a complete redo.–P


#9

The brick above the roof line looks a lot better than the brick under the roof line.

The roofer should have replaced that flashing. What they should have done is installed riglet flashing. It’s a small chimney and wouldn’t take very long to do.

Caulk would only be a temp. repair at best for the existing flashing.

Either get a big bucket for the chimney or get those roofers back out. Roof looks steep in the pictures so you won’t want to go up there.


#10

They should have figured the cost of replacing it into their bid.

It is extremely rare when I find that a chimney flashing is done correctly, so I replace about 80-90 percent of the ones I run into.

Ed


#11

[quote=“ed the roofer”]They should have figured the cost of replacing it into their bid.

It is extremely rare when I find that a chimney flashing is done correctly, so I replace about 80-90 percent of the ones I run into.

Ed[/quote]

80-90% is about right. Some chimneys have extremely thick flashing that can last several reroofs. If the roofer didn’t charge you for new flashing on the chimney they may just caulk it and call it good. Looks like they put on laminats which is good.


#12

We always put new counter flashing on,we clean gutters,never an attic,get roofer to put in bathroom vent,and confront about window,it is possible roofer doesnt know about window.


#13

One point I would like to make about cracked windows, and I am NOT insinuating that this is your case.

I have had at least 3 occasions in about the past 5 years, which upon completion, the Home Owner had suggested that our crew had broken a window.

I always look into it. Also, we a pretty good about taking on job start photos. On those 3 occasions, the pre-job start photos clearly indicated that they already had broken glass, totally undue to our presence.

Now, this is not to insinuate that any of these 3 home owners were being deceptive either, but it probably was that they never had walked around there property looking for any issues prior to giving their home the final once over.

So, is there asphalt stains on the glass or framing or siding near-by?

Also, on other occasions, where I did not have clear proof to vindicate our crew, the window was immediately called in for an on-site glazing repair by a glass contractor.

I even paid for 3 windows on one home, where the crazy lady we did the job for was shown the pre-job start photos and she still would not budge, and I just wanted to get paid for the end of the job, so sucked it up to experience.

Ed


#14

One thing that I learned over the years is that…
pictures don’t lie…I take very close up “Before” pictures, and after pictures. I also do a walk around with a two page checklist of every little thing imaginable…lights working, doorbells ringing, storm windows not opening/ closing, window sashes painted closed, chimney flashing not adequate, gutters already damaged, downspouts missing, plants and shrubs etc.

as far as the day light on this chjimney flashing…I can see the places where the light can come in from here, on the ground. Chimney flashing replacement is not an option on my bids. I include them, same with pipe flanges, boots, etc. Just remember, your customer is thinking that when you tell them that you will match or beat any and all competitors bids, they are being sold a deluxe package…including everything…even though you might have never discussed this with them…some one else has, and now they expect it from everyone.


#15

Agreed it’s a good idea for everyone to take photos. First is a whole house photo with plywood on lower roof (from roofers) a day before they really started (window not broken by door). Next is a cropped image of the window from that photo, lightened a bit in Photoshop (not broken), hard to see if it is or not, I agree. Next is a close up, the morning after they finished (broken).

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227495379.jpg

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227495405.jpg

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/7105/img_1227495420.jpg


#16

What’s concerning me now is that there appears to be some hooded ghost in the 2nd photo! LOL, interesting…


#17
  1. We are supposed to clean out the mess that we put into the gutter. Shingles,nails,trash.
    There was already 1/4 inch of granules laying in the gutter when we got there.
    I will clean a good portion of this out too but it will not look spit-shined when i am done. There will still be granules in there.

The roofer is responsible… but is only reasonably responsible for the debris that he created.

  1. debris in attic. no.
    although it would be wise to warn the homeowner during a re-deck that they should remove valuables in attic or cover them up.
    ON the other hand, If the homeowner didn’t think of this on his own, then the things in the attic must have not been too valuable to them.

There shouldn’t be to many large pieces of anything falling into the attic. It should really only be basically dirt,nails,granules,chips of roofing paper.

3.Chimney, If he wasn’t going to replace that flashing, He should have at least re-sealed the top of the flashing. You need some grey vulkem or grey NP1.
Both are quality polyurethane.
Lead is a lifetime product but it needs some work.
The mortar has fallen out in a couple of spots.
I would just go buy two tubes myself and hand them to the roofer when he gets there. That way he doesn’t have to come back or attempt to use some other product. Tell him you want it “massaged in” or
"tooled in"
I hate a roofer that just uses his caulking gun but doesn’t use his finger. They suck and are inexperienced.

Window, be polite, the company owner might not know it ever happened. Be cool either way. It can be worked out.


#18

A new roof will put a layer of granules in your gutters because it will shed the loose granules.

We generally remove the gutters and reinstall them after we are done. The granules will appear anyway.

As far as the chimney goes, I can see there has been a lot of leaking going on there over time. They should have paid very close attention to this.

On a side note… do you have one or more gas appliances exhausting into your chimney? Is it lined?

The products of complete combustion of gas are carbon dioxide and water, which hydrolyze into carbonic acid and destroy the mortar in your chimney.

Wood fires don’t do this nearly as bad because the soot protects the chimney.

That chimney is in terrible condition and needs to be tuck pointed by a mason. That would be a good time to mortar new flashing in. Of course, you could just demolish it - that would be cheaper.

If I was doing this roof, I’d be afraid to touch that chimney.

And they should definitely send a handyman back there to glaze a new pane of glass in.


#19

god that chimney flashing looks terrible… hahha i can’t believe you’ didn’t say anything… in my life i swear i’ve never done’ anything remotely that shotty not even on a sheet of ice and in a down pour god that looks like shit…