Roofer damaged siding - what is appropriate resolution?


#1

Hi,

I just had a new roof put on my house in the past week. We chose a very reputable local roofer, but it appears that the crew on our project was very reckless during the removal of the old roof. As a result, they severely damaged a Japanese Maple (a very expensive tree - 1.5K to replace), and approximately 20 dents, tears and scratches in our siding.

The roofer has admitted being at fault.

The roofer proposed replacing the siding at cost - approximately 9K. While that may be a fair deal (not sure), it would still require a big cash outlay - one that I really can’t afford in this economy.

What do you feel is an appropriate resolution? I don’t want to be unfair, but the damage is undeniable, and if we ever sold our house, we’d have to replace the siding.

I still owe 9K for the completed roof.

I welcome any thoughts! Thanks in advance!


#2

what type of siding do you have?


#3

The siding is standard, builder-grade 20 year old aluminum siding, 3.75 inch.


#4

Did you talk to him about going through his insurance to cover the repairs ?


#5

Regarding the insurance question - we haven’t approached that question. Would it be reasonable to expect them to replace all the siding on the house? It sounds like alot to expect, but on the other hand, spot replacement of the damaged parts is not an option.


#6

[quote=“Rollhigher”]Hi,

We chose a very reputable local roofer, but it appears that the crew on our project was very reckless during the removal of the old roof. As a result, they severely damaged a Japanese Maple (a very expensive tree - 1.5K to replace), and approximately 20 dents, tears and scratches in our siding.
[/quote]

 Did he sub your roof out? I can't believe he can keep a good reputation with that kind of damage?..DaveB

#7

They said they normally don’t sub out work, but admitted they did on our job…lucky us…


#8

It may be very reasonable to replace only the damaged panels if they are still available. If not, maybe replace the damaged area with the most similar material available. This should be done at the contractor’s cost.

There’s no sense in replacing all the siding, especially what they didn’t damage.

If I scratched a limo, should I be forced to buy the limo company 10 new limos because the freshly painted limo doesn’t match the other 9 anymore?

If you insist on having all your siding replaced, it would be fair to have the contractor pay for the damaged area in full and sell the rest of the siding job at a preferred price. You’d be getting utility that you didn’t have before, such as additional R value from fanfold insulation under the siding. Besides, after 20 years, aluminum siding is bound to get dented up.

But get other estimates to make sure he’s not jacking up the price to offset the repaired area.

But to be 100% honest, I have seen this before with owners that want to turn a small amount of damage into a large amount of free home improvements. Hope you ain’t that guy!


#9

You should conrtact his insurance company if you cannot come to a agreement. If he subbed the roof out the subs SHOULD have an insurance company to contact. Unfortunately if you did not check about the insurance before the job, in the end, you may be the one holding the bag. Hopefully, you can work this out, sometimes, it is better for all parties involved to let the insurance handle the situation.


#10

[quote=“Bodybagger”]It may be very reasonable to replace only the damaged panels if they are still available. If not, maybe replace the damaged area with the most similar material available. This should be done at the contractor’s cost.

There’s no sense in replacing all the siding, especially what they didn’t damage.

If I scratched a limo, should I be forced to buy the limo company 10 new limos because the freshly painted limo doesn’t match the other 9 anymore?

If you insist on having all your siding replaced, it would be fair to have the contractor pay for the damaged area in full and sell the rest of the siding job at a preferred price. You’d be getting utility that you didn’t have before, such as additional R value from fanfold insulation under the siding. Besides, after 20 years, aluminum siding is bound to get dented up.

But get other estimates to make sure he’s not jacking up the price to offset the repaired area.

But to be 100% honest, I have seen this before with owners that want to turn a small amount of damage into a large amount of free home improvements. Hope you ain’t that guy![/quote]

If the matching siding is not available,then yes he should replace all siding.It matched before they started and should when they leave as well.Any damage to a homeowners property should be repaired to the homeowners satisfaction.


#11

[quote=“Bodybagger”]

But to be 100% honest, I have seen this before with owners that want to turn a small amount of damage into a large amount of free home improvements. Hope you ain’t that guy![/quote]

My goal is not to take these guys for free improvements. My dilemma is that I want a reasonable resolution, but I think it’s reasonable for a homeowner to expect that their home not be damaged during an installation. If replacement siding was available, I’d definitely go that direction, but we’ve looked into this and it’s not an option - the roofer agrees.

I’m still looking for additional views, so any comments from all would be appreciated!


#12

Can you post a pic or two? Damage to siding does’nt usually amount to much more than a few shingle scars from the rip. What about the jap maple?


#13

Tell him he is resposible for the damages not you. ANd yes hold that money!


#14

ditto what GTP said. It is his fault, he subbed out the job to a inexperienced bad roofer. nice guys get screwed in cases like this. he needs to make the jobsite like like they were never there. I would be seriously worried about a crew like this. Is the roof leaking or blowing off yet ?


#15

i think it would be fair that you would agree on a amount of money that the damage is worth…you have to consider that your aluminium siding is 20 years old wich is pretty much crap…the amount given by the contractor could pay parts of your future siding.


#16

Wants to replace all siding for 9k? Yet this guy was at fault in the 1st place, sounds like a win win for him to me, what’s coming next sod replacement. Get 3 quotes for damage , I would hold back that average amnt


#17

Now imagine this: A guy has a 4 year old tires on his car with MAYBE about 5,000 miles left on them before they are completely slick. He gets a roofing nail in one of them. Walmart won’t patch it because they say the tires are already too worn to repair. So he sends you a certified letter demanding $400 for 4 new tires at your expense, because after all, the car won’t drive right with 1 new tire and 3 bald tires.

In reality, the 60,000 mile tire with 5,000 miles left on it only has 8% of its useful life left. So its ACTUAL MONETARY VALUE due to depreciation is 8% of the replacement cost, or 8 dollars. So if you indeed punctured his tire, then you caused $8 of property damage.

Why should you replace a worn out garbage tire with a brand new one? Much less replace ALL the tires? Well, this exact scenario happened to us and we ended up paying even though we did nothing wrong just to keep our name squeaky clean.

What user "JeremieDoucet"pointed out (and what I tried to point out in my original post) is that siding depreciates in value over time, and 20 year old aluminum siding has depreciated A LOT.

A new siding job today probably will cost 5 times what the aluminum job cost when it was new back in the day! Much less the depreciated value today.

What I’m saying is that if I ran into a 1988 Toyota Corolla (that blue books for $750) at a customer’s job site, should I buy them a 2008 model for 16 thousand dollars just because you can’t buy a fender for the old model any more?

Now if someone maliciously set about to destroy your property, that’s another story, but this is an accident and you are entitled to be “made whole” which means you should be compensated for the actual amount of the damages.

Ask your accountant to calculate the depreciated value of your 20 year old siding given an expected service life of 30 years. Any compensation above this is is not “making you whole” but making you “better than whole.”

But indeed, withhold payment until this matter is resolved. Yes, this is his fault, but being at fault does not give the other party a blank check for getting a 2008 Corolla.


#18

I would expect the damaged siding to be replaced at no cost, but only the damaged panels.
It gets a bit confusing since it is often very hard to locate your type of siding.
I would strongly suggest contacting the contractors insurance.
I would also hold the 9k until your siding is repaired.


#19

I disagree. A good roofing crew knows how to work without destrying a custumers property.


#20

All,

I’m the original poster of this question. Thanks for all the feedback - you can understand why I asked the original question. There are alot of conflicting views, and I’ve struggled with coming up with the right, fair answer. If we had a new house, it would be an easy answer. The 20 year old siding makes it more challenging.

The damaged old car examples are somewhat valid, but if a car was in an accident, replacement parts could be purchased and with some additional repairs, the car could be brought back to original condition. That’s not the case for us, however. If we weren’t planning to replace the siding (which we weren’t), but have now been put in a position which would require replacing it if we were to sell, haven’t we been put in a significantly worse position as a result of the installer’s negligence?

Again, I don’t have the answers yet, but I continue to seek more feedback as I try to come up with a fair resolution for all!