Roller coaster front eave


#1

Planning to tearoff two layers of asphalt shingles and install GAF-ElK timberline shingles. Front eaves are not straight across, rather up and down, roller coaster type design. Do they make a flexible drip edge for curved eaves or will I have to contact a metal shop to bend the metal drip edge? Also, the edges of the shingles at the rakes are curved. Was this wrap method done to facilitate installation by the roofers who installed the second layer,or a method used to enhance the architectural design. Should I continue the wrap design? I don’t think there’s a drip edge along the rake edge, currently. Gable style roof


#2

Post a photo of the house design in question.

If it is similar to one that I did many years ago, that curved edge detail is an architectural design.

The one I worked on, had 3 foot arced radius gables and eave edges.

I will post a link to the thread from where that discussion took place.

Ed

edit: Here is the link.

contractortalk.com/showthread.php?t=37277


#3

Do they make a flexible drip edge for curved eaves or will I have to contact a metal shop to bend the metal drip edge?

They don’t make a flexible drip edging that I know of. For something like that we would make our own drip edge out of copper and use a shrinker/stretcher to form the radius needed.

Also, the edges of the shingles at the rakes are curved downward toward the brass gutters.

Eave is the horizontal edge of the roof, rake is the vertical, perhaps you have these confused? I’ve never seen brass gutters. Normally when shingles are curled at the edge like you describe it is because they were left to hang over the roof edge too much. Won’t know if that is the case or not without pics.

**
Was this wrap method done to facilitate installation by the roofers who installed the second layer,or a method used to enhance the architectural design. Should I continue the wrap design?**

I doubt it. Chances are good from your description that it was poor installation. Unless maybe it’s one of those pre-fab SEARS rounded eave/rake nightmares.

Post some pics if you want better advice please.
What’s up with that nick, man? You some kinda hit man or something? lol.


#4

Tried sending images, but unsuccessful. I can attach the images onto an email to you. My email address is my-company@sbcglobal.net
Thanks for responding!
Milt


#5

For those interested in what his roof looks like that he is referring to, click on the link that I have in my previous post and the one that I did has more swells and valleys to it, but you will get the idea, if you think of just the eaves being curved.

Some call it a Cotswald Cottage roof

Some say simulated Thatch Style

Some say Mushroom style

Others say Gingerbread Style

The more accurate term is Old English Cottage. It has rolling hips, valleys, dormers and eave and rake edged details on the fully designated architecture.

Ed


#6

Only seen those roofs in pictures never seen one in person. It would be tough to run those crooked rows after running only straight rows for so many years. Perhaps a few drinks could help? LOL!!!


#7

You assuming it is that style of roof, Ed or did he send you photos via email? Because from his description, Front eaves are not straight across, rather up and down, roller coaster type design. I would be more inclined to picture a flat but wave like fascia. Also there would be no need to ask how to put drip edge on a rounded rake/eave…it doesn’t have any.

Anyways figure out how to get some pics up on the web somehow or you already have what limited help I can give without them. /shrug


#8

you can make drip edge conform nicely by several old indian tricks. One is to take a pair of downspout crimpers and crimp the face. it will then form around an arch or radius flawlessly. some guys will notch it but they dont have to. If you use this trick you owe me a coffee.


#9

He sent me 2 e-mail photos. I haven’t ever created a gallery here yet, so I will add these photos to that other link, because that seems simpler to do.

Yes, it is a minor version of my photos in that thread.

Ed


#10

You da man. :smiley:


#11

If you do notch a radiused metal edging, make sure to use the Greens and Reds so that the overlap feathers upward, so you do not see any of the seams from the ground.

Can’t even tell it was cut that way. Then, for a tighter fit, use blind pop rivets to secure the flaps together.

Ed


#12

Ed,

Would a drip edge along the rakes and eaves be necessary, given the roof style? I plan to install
Gaf-Elk timberline arch. shingles. I don’t think theres any drip edges currently along the rakes. Not certain about the eaves, though.

Milt


#13

It would not be necessary due to the arc feature profile of those edges. The curved eaves do not bestow themselves for that requirement.

Ed


#14

If you have curved eave and rakes, bending architectural’s over them could be a problem.
It will definitely need to be warm when you do this.
You may want to look into a non laminated shingle for this application, something like a Hatteras or slateline.


#15

Axiom,

That is exactly what was wonderful about using the architectural style shingles on the job in the contractor talk link that I did back in 1991.

Those were the former JM Woodlands 25’s that we used and they formed perfectly over the radius.

It still looks just as good today as it did 17 years ago.

Did you check out the OP’s photos I placed in that thread? Those are currently done with 3-tabs and look awful.

Ed


#16

I’ve never done a curved eave/rake, never had the opportunity, they look like a major PITA…
If it works I bet it looks nice.
I guess it works, I can’t see doing it in the cold though.