Rigid ridge vent appearance on 4/12


#1

You guys were so helpful with my previous question, I can’t help but ask another.

On my current roofing renovation plan, I have specified an externally-baffled rigid vent like the ShingleVent II / Cobra.

My house is a simple ranch house, straight 4/12 roof, about 52’ x 28’, sitting parallel to the street and about 5’ higher than the sidewalk. The plane of the roof meets my eye at about 20’ from the house.

Since I try to do everything ‘right’, I specified the Shinglevent type vent over the typical mesh / Scotchbrite roll vent that everyone else has around here. I got the impression from the roofers bidding the job that the rigid vents are rarely done by them, and they added that the mesh kind is ‘barely visible’.

Now that I think about the bigger picture (beyond pure performance), I am concerned about the possible negative appearance (excuse the cliche - ‘curb appeal’) of the rigid vent on my house possibly outweighing the performance benefits. I think they look realy good on steep pitch roofs, but I’m not sure it will on mine where you don’t see much of the roof beyond a few degrees above the plane. I’ll probably move from this house in 2-3 years and doubt the average homebuyer will comprehend the airflow benefits or read a whitepaper on the subject…

Am I being too anal retentive in wanting the rigid vent? Or am I be for even caring about the appearance…?

Anyone had any comments from homeowners or other on the appearance of rigid vents on lower / 4/12 roofs?

Also, does anyone have experience using the colored ShingleVents? I was thinking the charcoal or gray might work better than black with medium to dark gray/slate shingles. Of course I get the feeling that having to special order colored vents might get me dropped by my bidders for being too picky…

Thanks again.

JMorgan
Northern Virginia


#2

I can not comment about the eye level appeal, but I install the SV II on many 4/12’s and it looks just fine.

The other guys just do not want to hand nail the better rigid vent product in place and it costs more than the brillo pad vents.

Ed


#3

I can not comment about the eye level appeal, but I install the SV II on many 4/12’s and it looks just fine.

The other guys just do not want to hand nail the better rigid vent product in place and it costs more than the brillo pad vents.

Ed


#4

I can not comment about the eye level appeal, but I install the SV II on many 4/12’s and it looks just fine.

The other guys just do not want to hand nail the better rigid vent product in place and it costs more than the brillo pad vents.

Ed


#5

Thanks for the input, you are probably right. I figure I’ll go ahead and do it. I’ll probably never look up on the roof again a day after it’s installed…

They are quoting about $5-6/ft. for it though…


#6

Around here that is about half price.

It is well worth the better investment, as long as they are familiar with the specifications and install it correctly.

The good guys use 2 1/2" to 3" long hand roofing nails. Nail down the plastic vent sections first and then nail in the shingle ridge caps with the same nails.

Ed


#7

Lets just hope you have enough ridge to support the roofs ventilation needs.


#8

make sure they dont install it with a gun!!


#9

I had Shinglevent installed on my house and not the mesh type.

I had Owens Corning lifetime duration shingles installed and the hip and ridge shingle have a high raised profile look - much higher than a typical hipo and ridge shingle. Although the extra heigth looks great on my garage where I have no ridge vents with the combination of the high shinglevent and the raised profile hip and ridge it is a bit undesirable to look at! But I know I have a good product installed so I am OK with it.


#10

If you are concerned about the visibility from the street side, there is also the possibility of a “half vent” - it’s essentially a ridge vent, but only one half (you’d point it to the back) is going to ventilate. The ‘street side’ is essentially flush to the roof deck.

One thing I don’t know about is how much NFA (net free air) you get out of this, so I suggest you ask your local ROOFING SUPPLY HOUSE (not a generic lumber yard) if they have any brochures - then compare what they list as the air exchange or volume. I would assume it’s 1/2 of a regular (full width) ridge vent.

I know Atlas makes one & I think the Smart Vent co. has one as well.


#11

If you want it to be “right” you should use the best product for the job, the product with the most Net Free Area.
It is supposed to rise above the ridgeline, that is why it works.
It may look funny to you at first but it will soon blend into the roof and you won’t even notice it.
I think a house doesn’t look right if it doesn’t have ridgevent…
Ya know what looks funny is the 10’ aluminum ridgevents, they work great though.


#12

Axiom is correct in the ‘right product for the right application’… after about 2 weeks, you won’t even notice it & if it’s a buyer that you are concerned about, chances are they won’t notice.

Let me tell you what’s 10x worse: having a painter do your house & for some unknown reason, they decide to paint all the vent pipes IN A CONTRASTED COLOR in comparison to the shingles. Talk about ugly.


#13

Thanks!

I’m going to go ahead with the ShingleVent, and it will be what it is! (although the idea of the half vent is interesting). Hopefully they know how to install it correctly of course.

Yes, I’ll probably get used to it quickly and never think about it again…likely because I will be off being anal about something else…