Ridge vents or not?


#1

I am replacing my roof which has gable vents and a power roof fan(with a thermostat). Contractor #1 tells me I should not add a ridge vent as the power fan will suck air and moisture into the attic through the ridge vent.
Contractor #2 tells me what #1 says is ridiculous, and furthermore if I do not add a ridge vent the shingle manufacture would void the shingle warranty. So who do I believe?


#2

Close the gable vents and add ridgevent.


#3

Remove the power vent and install ridge vents.
Make sure that your intakes are clear.


#4

number one contractor is correct,and like stated you would need to block off the gable vents to install ridge vent.


#5

Hi,

The power roof vent is the better system. The down side is it takes electric and you have to check on it. They can burn out. Then you are left with no ventalation.

The second contractor is not telling you the whole story. The warranty will be issued with a power roof vent.


#6

Provided you have adequate intake air.

A. None of the above, except Lefty

If you have existing gable and power vents, your priority should be installing soffit vents sized according to the power vent exhaust CFM.

There are too many variables to discuss in a short post, so you may want to check these links for more information.

roofingcontractorreview.com/Roof … ation.html
roofingcontractorreview.com/Powe … -Fans.html
roofingcontractorreview.com/Roof … -Myth.html


#7

With all those vents,your gonna short circuit the ventilation.Just kidding Dennis,lol


#8

Here we go again. 1 vent system can only be used on the roof. You can listen to dennis and he does some nice work, or you can go to http://www.airvent.com and learn all there is to know aobut roof ventilation from a billion dollar company. Dennis i respect you very much, but i can not stand by and read this much more. I asked my certainteed and gaf reps about gable vents, both said without asking other than open or closed gable vents they both said voided warranty on shingles for inproper ventilation. That sealed it for me.

As far as a power vent they used energy and burn up. WIthout the correct ammount of intake they both will not work, normally the power vent burns up without an intake source very quickly. Ridge vent is the way to go if you have enough ridge and the proper ammount of intake. It costs nothing to work but if you have a power vent and ridge vent then yes the ridge vent will suck in moisture.


#9

if power vent works good keep it,
dont need ridge vents.
if someone has to have a ridge vent up then
tell em to put one up and just dont cut the hole out.

gweedo.


#10

GTP 1003,

Have you read the GAF warranty lately?
They changed the limitations on coverage. They took out all the references to a “balanced system” and venting ratios and replace it with simply “inadequate attic ventilation”. They also replaced the wording regarding shingling over an unvented roof system.

Why do you think they would do that?


#11

A power vent is nice, but it uses a fair amount of electricity in the summer. A well insulated attic with plenty of clear soffit vents, and an adequate ridge vent like Shingle Vent II from Certainteed (Not Cobra vent) is sufficient to properly vent the attic.


#12

Theres always solar power vents.More costly and you would probably need a couple.


#13

The power vent is not coming out. I just replaced it last year. It obviously uses electricity but you have to remember the AC should run less. Anyways, when the last fan died(and it took about 2-3 weeks to replace it)
the 2nd floor was much warmer(about 10 degrees).

I don’t understand why among professional contractors there is so much disagreement over adding a ridge vent or not. This is not rocket science, although there is some physics involved.

So to ask again, the original roof has gable vents and a power fan. They are staying. Do you add a ridge vent or not?


#14

[quote=“motes2”]The power vent is not coming out. I just replaced it last year. It obviously uses electricity but you have to remember the AC should run less. Anyways, when the last fan died(and it took about 2-3 weeks to replace it)
the 2nd floor was much warmer(about 10 degrees).

I don’t understand why among professional contractors there is so much disagreement over adding a ridge vent or not. This is not rocket science, although there is some physics involved.

So to ask again, the original roof has gable vents and a power fan. They are staying. Do you add a ridge vent or not?[/quote]

Why ask,it’s not rocket science!!


#15

Hi,

You were told that you should not add a ridge vent.

You are going with the better exhaust system with the power vent.

The power vent will suck air from the point of least resistance. If you add a ridge vent that will be the closest point. This will make it an intake vent instead of an exhaust.


#16

Theres disagreements because there is more than one way to do it. Dont add the ridgevent if you dont want. Personally, I would not want to pay electricty for the power vent considering if the ventilation is done properly it will pretty much do the same thing. Then again, since this is not rocket science and every peter paul and mary know how to do a roof I do not understand why you have any questions?


#17

Bottom line is don’t have a ridge vent and power vent.


#18

I thought I was pretty clear.

[quote]If you have existing gable and power vents, your priority should be installing soffit vents sized according to the power vent exhaust CFM.
[/quote]

If you still have ventilation issues, ie. the attic is still to hot or there are moisture issues, add the ridge vent.

If you don’t have adequate soffit venting, the power vent will draw air from the path of least resistance. The other gable vent first, because it is less restricted than the ridge vent. Then the ridge vent, then the home interior.* Which ever is least restricted, not the closest.*

No, it’s not rocket science, it’s building science!


#19

fiesty poster huh?

gweedo


#20

[quote=“motes2”]The power vent is not coming out. I just replaced it last year. It obviously uses electricity but you have to remember the AC should run less. Anyways, when the last fan died(and it took about 2-3 weeks to replace it)
the 2nd floor was much warmer(about 10 degrees).

I don’t understand why among professional contractors there is so much disagreement over adding a ridge vent or not. This is not rocket science, although there is some physics involved.

So to ask again, the original roof has gable vents and a power fan. They are staying. Do you add a ridge vent or not?[/quote]

you state that the power vent is not coming out but I will surely tell you that I would remove it and cover the hole and install ridge ventilation because ridge vent provides more ventilation per sq. foot than the fan and also the fan uses electricity wouldnt it be smarter to save money for the life of that roof and also ensure the life of your roof with the proven most effective type of ventilation. everyone knows heat rises ,the ridge is the best point for that warm moist air to escape. The fan is in one central location and does not effectively and efficiently exhaust the attic compared to vent. I hope my opinion counts