Repair billing


#1

When billing for flat roof leak repair should you bill time + material or just time. If your billing stait time what is a good rate and if billing time and material what should be rate per manhour and should you make a profit off of materials also? I spent 3 years doing flat roofs but recently started working for a company that does mainly pitched residential shingle roofs but my employer is hoping to start doing flat roof leak repairs over the winter and im researching the billing and logistics of takeing his company in this direction in what is typically an off season for pitched roofs in west mich. would greatly appreciate any input that you might have.


#2

Hi,

Your boss should know what he needs an hour to run his business. We do not know.

I know what I need to run a truck with two people an hour.

How could you not charge for materials? Some repairs take $20 in materials, some $150. It may take the same amout of time to apply both.

I charge from the time I leave the shop till the job is done. Then the next job starts as soon as I leave that job.


#3

i charge between $75-100 per hr plus materials


#4

minumum charge of $199 + tax to do any repair. i price based on my quality / reputation/ overhead…and the alternative is…do it yourself or hire another hack “roofer”. i am in a fairly small community with very few “reputable” roofers to compete with. Also my price reflects my PROMPT service.


#5

I dont even know why all you good roofers responded to this. Your boss is a hack if he’s going to have you as a lead man on flat roofs with only 3 years experience. You dont know diddly squat. Put in some time and come back and talk to us. It’s people like you that give the customers a bad taste in their mouths before I ever even pick up my phone. I pity the customer that hires you and hope your boss is smart enough to carry a whole lot of liability at least.


#6

wow talk about a personal attack. at my prev employer i had made foreman before personal differences :i.e. no medical insurance: caused me to leave. i’m not saying that id be doing whole new roofs just finding a leak and patching it with w/e material is necessary be it modifies rubber tpo duralast ect. idk what your learning curve is like but if you cant envision installing a roof with 3 years of doing nothing but that for 40-60 hrs a week i wonder if any of your employees are highschool graduates let alone kindergarten. anyways ty for the input guys i’ve never handles the business portion of this field just filling out my time material cards and turning them in to my billing dept. so sorry for the rant just find it hard not to defend myself when being called a hack.


#7

all 96 of my employees are high school graduates.they have also completed 4 yrs of apprenticship classes. i guess that makes them all better qualified than you to roof any thing.


#8

Hey give this guy some slack. He has some education up there. I go by time and materials. So basically a 30 foot valley would cost somewhere in the 1300 dollar range. Now if you are in a more finacially diverse area then that same repair could go to 2500 like it has in the past. Hope this helps. If you need any other help dont feel uneasy to post or send me an email. Good luck on everything


#9

I’d be more comfortable if you WERE doing whole new roofs with specs and inspectors coming. Like I said, three years experience you’re still too green to know what you don’t know. I was a straight A student that ended up roofing because I couldn’t handle authority figures barking at me. That being said, 13 years and I dont know everything. I know enough for my roofs to last a while, but I sell what I know. Repair work in my opinion should be left to the veterans.


#10

I will agree with that severance


#11

Hi,

I was doing repairs my first year in business at age 25. That was 2 months after doing my first roof with my last employer.

Learned everything on the job. My jobs.

Never had call backs. Been doing business in the same town the whole time for 26 years.

Think like water. Pay attention when you tear off. That is where you learn the most.


#12

We all had to start somwhere. give the poor guy a break guys.
repair work is a great part of the industry, there are many tricks to learn but you can make good money at it.

RooferJim

J.Bennette Roofing inc.
Massachusetts