Quotes on a New Roof


#1

Hello,

First of all, I wan to thank everyone in advance for their time and knowledge. This site is a great resource for all things roofing for all home owners and DYIers. On to my question, I live in South Florida and my insurance company recently notified me that my roof has reached the end of its life cycle and unless I install a new roof, they wont renew my policy. I find it funny that they would know with certainty my roof reached the end of its life cycle considering there are no permits filed with the County showing the previous date the roof was replaced. I’m not going to argue with the insurance company, the singles are stiff, showing signs of “curling”, etc, so I agree with their conclusion. I will start calling roofing companies in the coming days in order to solicit multiple bids (at least 4) in order to select the winning bid.

A few details about my home, it currently has architectural shingles and I will be using Landmark shingles which a lot of people on this forum recommend. The total area under AC is 1500 sq/ft which I believe works out to be 15 squares. There is an attached covered porch with a flat roof with a total area of approximately 300 sq/ft. This area is leaking badly and will also be replaced. I have a cathedral ceiling over the living room with no attic under it, so this area gets really hot during summer months here in South Florida. I’m hoping to address this issue by installing insulation boards between the felt paper and the shingles. After doing some research, this is what I have in mind:

  • List item
  1. The contractor I select must have been in business at least 7 years, be licensed and insured.
  2. Initially I was planning on using synthetic felt, but after a reading a post where roof_lover made a compelling argument in favor of #30 felt paper, I will be going with felt paper over synthetic.
  3. Ice & Water shield on the valleys, as well as, other areas where leaks could be a problem such as the area where the porch meets the house, etc.
    4.Insulation boards between the felt paper and shingles over the living room (cathedral ceiling).
  4. New drip edge
  5. Remove and replace rotten decking
  6. GAF Liberty self adhering system on the covered porch.

To all the professionals, what would a job like this cost? I understand there are many variables involved, I just want a guesstimate to have a reference point. Thanks to all.

The contractor I select must have been in business at least 7 years, be licensed and insured.


#2

If you add insulation on top of the roof deck you will need to add a layor of plywood on top of the insulation to nail the shingles to. You would want the felt on top of the new plywood and insulation, not the old. It might be cheaper to remove the old plywood, insulate the ceiling, install baffles and new plywood. You would probably get a better R value that way.

I am all about using quality 30# felt.

Look into landmark pro shingles. Here in pa they are less than 10$ per square difference. We have been using them as our standard for the past 5+ years.


#3

If your home is 1500sf,your roof is likely much larger. Depending on pitch and overhangs. 4/12,which I understand is pretty common in Florida would likely get closer to 20,22squares.
Just letting you know so your not surprised when you get the bids.

The other option for your cathedral section would be hunter panels. They have insulated nailable panels with a vent channel through them and are designed for that use. They are quite expensive however.


#4

Im thinking 25 sq if he does a good job trying to not get any side seams if possible on the flat.
Also thinking low slope 3-4 pitch
Im installing full ice and water shield on those
Even though i am only required by law to install it below a 4.(or two ply of any d.226 underlayment)
You are wanting to put Archs.
You must use the best underlayment.
Youve got cathedral ceilings.
Your contractor will be using the self-adhered,
Not felt.
You dont want the million simplex fasteners that the gov requires. Messing up your boards.

Your cost is going to be around the 10k mark.
That is if you dont whisper a single word about your insulation, decking.
If you do, the skys the limit.
Maybe 20k. Especially if you live on a busy road.
Or difficult access
Or i think you are going to be a difficult customer.

I have been praising certainteed and been a steady certainteed salesman and installer for 20 years straight. With short stints of using Owens Corning and Atlas.
I stopped using them because of Lot# issues.
Just never had to worry about that with Certainteed.
That is the superior reason over anything else.

Well, now i believe as of now that Atlas has overcome that problem.
And they have overcome issues that Certainteed has not.
Algae/streaking
A proper fastening area.

I just have to say that i think 90 percent of roofers are not talented or patient enough to nail the landmarks correctly which is especially important on a low slope roof.
Please take this statement seriously.
They will all be using nail guns.
Most will not know when they shoot into an air space and they are being told to use 6 nails per shingle.
They need to move the nail pattern up or down to miss the air spaces between your boards.
Certainteeds proper nail area is too small.
(most other manufactuers are even smaller)

Atlas has made their durable double thickness nailing area a dream come true for a quality installation. The height/width of the nailing area is superior.
And hopefully they have truely conquered Algae and streaking.
Something that happens with Landmarks at year 6 in north florida.
You would be recieving the shingles from the exact plants i buy them from.


#5

We don’t get atlas here in Canada, just how wide is the double thickness? That’s a major upgrade on any shingle.


#6

The nailing area on Certainteed is one inch tall.
Atlas is 1 5/8. And it is tapered between the upper meeting of the double thickness to single thickness.
Now i am getting most fasteners in the double thickness AND not correcting a bunch of exposed/low nails.

And the peace of mind to NOT be disapointed
With my own work after 7-8 years
Because of algae/streaking.


#7

The nailing area on Malarkeys is the same as the Atlas it sounds like.

I still nail them in the same place as I always have, right in the thickest part of the double laminate area.


#8

That’s a great upgrade. The small double thickness is a major flaw in laminated shingles. Back in the 3 tab days, you would see some single tabs blowing off,now it’s entire sections when they’re nailed even a 1/4" above the double.


#9

I think Someone here said that Pabco also has the superior nailing area height.
Though i am not in an area to be able to buy them along with Malarky. :frowning:

I think i heard you say Malarky is also a high grade Non- algae/streaking shingle.
Didnt you say they also partnered with 3m scotchguard?


#10

They claim that something like 7 1/2% copper/zinc content for the Vista line and 15% for the Legacy line.

It says Scotchguard right on the package.

IMO the Malarkey shingles are higher quality than Certainteed at a lower price point but most of the Certainteed shingles look nicer until streaking occurs.

I have never had an issue with a Cetainteed shingle in my entire time in business, I never sold the problematic lines.


#11

Right! Me either!
No
Mechanical issues , no defects!!
A long lasting good looking shingle
And that says a lot!!
Perhaps still the best reputation ever

But it just doesnt look great
long enough for me now.
Its just the algae/streaking issue i refuse to deal with any more.
I give a 10 year workmanship warranty.
I want all the shingles to look nice at least that long.


#12

BlockquoteIm thinking 25 sq if he does a good job trying to not get any side seams if possible on the flat.
Also thinking low slope 3-4 pitch
Im installing full ice and water shield on those
Even though i am only required by law to install it below a 4.(or two ply of any d.226 underlayment)
You are wanting to put Archs.
You must use the best underlayment.
Youve got cathedral ceilings.
Your contractor will be using the self-adhered,
Not felt.
You dont want the million simplex fasteners that the gov requires. Messing up your boards.

Blockquote

Thanks for the great information. @roof_lover, when you say you are now installing “ice and water shield on those” are you referring to “flat roofs”? I was wondering why more roofers aren’t applying ice and water shield to flat roofs given how durable the product seems to be. When you say “your contractor will be using the self-adhered” do you mean on the regular roof? In your professional opinion what is the best underlayment for arch. shingles? I went to Atlas’ and Malarkey’s website and it appears that there isnt a local distributor in the South Florida area…I could be wrong.

With regards to access, it shouldn’t be an issue. My neighbor across the street is currently having her roof redone by Paul Bange, a large roofing contractor in the area. From walking on the roof, I know for a fact there are a few rotten plywood sheets that will need replacing. Exactly how many, until the tear down is complete there is no way of knowing.


#13

Hey snakeo2,
Yes i was inferring to put “ice and water sheild”
Which is “self-adhered.
And putting it all over the entire low slope 3-4 pitch roof and also the flat.
If your roof is about 25 sq total
Then you would need about 13 rolls.
My favorite brands are polyglass TU,
Tarco ms300, Resisto and Griprite( made by resisto)
Hopefully your near by roofing store will have one of these.
Your hardware store will not.
But dont have your roofer torch over these products on the flat roof if they dont have the experience.
With certainteed torch-down flat roofing, the contractor is told to use their product “black diamond”
( or glass or organic base sheet)
That is their self-adhered flat underlayment for torch down roofing.
I think the product doesnt work nearly as well and is almost double the price.

Certainteed torch-down modified bitumen is still my favorite for flat roofs.
But i’m Always looking for something improved.


#14

Hey roof_lover,

thanks for the clarification. I think I have a better understanding now. When I meet with roofers over the next few weeks I will ask for the following:

-For underlayment, I will request Polyglass TU for both the flat roof and low pitch roof over the rest of the house.

-Landmark or Malarkey arch shingles (with the wide nailing area to ensure proper nailing) depending on availability in my area.
-Replace any rotten decking ( I have 10 plywood sheets leftover from last year’s hurricane)
-New Drip edge around the entire roof
-Will not insist on the insulation over the cathedral ceiling, instead I will consult with an HVAC contractor as to alternative ways to better cool the living room area.


#15

Excuse me ,i brain farted.
i didnt mean to say the TU. Im sorry.
Im Glad you posted a pic.
I meant to say the IR-X
Polyglass polystick IR-X.


#16

No problem at all. Essentially, the Polyglass polystick IR-X is a superior underlayment over conventional #30 Felt and ice and water shield as it offers waterproof protection and rubberized asphalt that seals around nails. it is self adhere so installation should be quicker. I’ll be honest, not a lot roofers in my area are using this type of underlayment. I agree that it is a better product…hopefully the roofers I meet with will know what I’m talking about. I mention this because I spoke to one of the guys working on the new roof across my house (Paul Bange Roofing) to get a business card and ask if they were using ice and water shield on the valleys and eves and the guy had no idea what that was.


#17

what roof pitch would you say this is? That’s a picture of my roof


#18

It seems like you’ve done some research and really want to make sure this is done right. What do you do for a living?

You are deep enough now that you can step into the contractors shoes. Most States allow you to. Check your local regulations and building codes though. This may sound crazy, but…

Pick out all that materials you will need for your roof, exactly what you want. Read about the warranties and proper installation. Educate yourself a bit, you’re about to be a project manager.

Go to Lowe’s or home depot or and find some cheap labor. Just for the removal process. Have them sign a waiver stating that if they get hurt, you will not be liable.

Now for those estimates, find a roofing company that would provide you with labor only and agree to pay them 20% above that. 10% for overhead and 10% profit. You can research the Overhead and profit issue if you’d like. Tell them you want proper installation and find a company that can offer the extended manufacturer warranty. If you live where you hardly get ins. claim level storms, this could work in your favor. Some manufacturers even offer labor warranties through approved contractors.

This is the life of a contractor… Could you or would you make a living doing this?


#19

There is a free app you can get on most smart phones which is a pitch guage.
The most accurate place to check is the bottom of the rake
Drip edge metal right there on the side of your house.

It looks like a 5 pitch but maybe it is a 4.
If it is a 5 pitch than no i would not use the ice and water shield.
I would use asphalt saturated 15# felt D.226.
30 pound if you like.
I dont like to use the 30# alot because
If you dont dont finish the roof before dark and you dont tarp it
It will wrinkle over night from the dew and will not lay down flat perfectly when the sun hits it.
15 d.226 will lay back perfectly flat.

Which ever underlayment you use in this discussion, big wrinkles need to be sliced with your knife right before the shingle is laid.
Make the slice through the center of the wrinkle from end to end.


#20

@FreeLancingLife

Thanks for the great tip. The thought of redoing the roof as a DIY project did cross my mind, but I feel the valley(close cut) is too crucial and I would not be comfortable doing it. I did consider doing exactly what you suggested but wasnt sure if a licensed roofer would agree to just getting paid for labor. As with most businesses, I imaging the profit margins on materials is where most roofers make most of their profits…I could be wrong. Assuming I can find a licensed roofer willing to accept the job and only bill me for labor, I would not have an issue hiring labor for the tear off, and replacement of rotten decking. To the professional roofers reading this, is this type of arrangement common in the industry?

@roof_lover,

I found an app (pitch factor) which lets you take a picture of your roof and it determines the roof pitch. I will try to use it tomorrow. I’m really hoping it’s a 4 pitch as I would prefer to use Polyglass polystick IR-X over the #15 or #30 felt paper.