Question about roof aprons


#1

Hi folks…

I had roof apron installed during my roof install and now that the gutters are going on, seems that the first gutter they are installing slopes AWAY slightly from the drain end…resulting in rainwater from last nights rains rising up to almost the top edge of the gutter on the downside, and almost none on the drain end…which means water will end up just sitting there…this is about a 20 foot long piece. Making it worse, the gutter for the porch that will tie into it hasnt been hung yet, so an overflow situation is definate.

They have the gutters hung on the flange of the roof apron…I was told by the contractor that this system is meant to “just hang” on the roof apron with no detectable slope"…but it was also mentioned to me that they may have to raise the low end of the gutter up (well, I could have told them that) but my question to the experts here is , won’t that open up a channel between the apron and gutter that water can back right up into, thus negating the whole idiea of the roof apron to begin with? Or is this a non issue?

Thanks for your advice folks.

Shadango


#2

pictures would help here, but I am going to guess that possibly the porch gutter might be the additional downspout location that currently is backing up.
When it is completed, this might go away?

As far as the apron being the only attachment for the gutter system…there’s something missing, like the hangers. Check out the alcoa website, there may be something there that shows you what I am talking about.

Hope this helps!!

David


#3

Thanks David, and sorry for the lack of detail on my part…

The house has a porch that juts away from it…

The gutter in question is the one that goes acorss the back of the house…on the gable end of the house, it terminates in a drain…on the other end, it goes up to the edge of the fasica om the side of the porch…there will be another gutter on that side of the porch, and the drain ends up over top of the first gutter, at a right angle…so it feeds into the first one…right at that “intersection”, the end of the first gutter, the water is up to the top of the gutter…at the other end (the drain end) it is barely wet. So obviously the gutter is not level.

The issue here is that the contractor claims that these types of gutters are meant to just be hung with no slope…that doesnt make sense to me…I have always have great running gutters, and they have always had the required amount of slope (I think its 1/4" per 10 feet of run?)…but they nailed directly into the fascia…This system hangs on a “j” channel on the back of the roof apron all the way acorss and then also has some brackets that tie in to the roof, under the first course of shingles.

The contractor is saying that the roof apron is simply following the sheathing of my house, so if there is negative slope, its the fault of the house and that the only way to fix woud be to physically raise the gutter on the downside up a bit, thus not utilizing the j channel at that end and creating a gap…

That doesnt seem right to me.

Or am I missing a fundamental? Will try and get some pictures tonight if that would help.


#4

that’s the problem with the roof apron…
the gutter line is always parallel to the fascia board/ sheathing intersection. There fore the gutter will go
along with the levelness of the structure.

possibly, another downspout can be added at the lower end and allow this to go into the lower porch gutter.

the other option would have been to use a fascia apron…similar theory, but becomes part of a two piece flashing, tieing into drip edge. The roof apron design is meant to be used as a combination drip edge and gutter hanger. I always use an additional drip edge over this apron and install the gutter and hangers before installing the roof. Hiding and sealing the hangers as I go along


#5

[quote=“baycompany”]that’s the problem with the roof apron…
the gutter line is always parallel to the fascia board/ sheathing intersection. There fore the gutter will go
along with the levelness of the structure.

possibly, another downspout can be added at the lower end and allow this to go into the lower porch gutter.

the other option would have been to use a fascia apron…similar theory, but becomes part of a two piece flashing, tieing into drip edge. The roof apron design is meant to be used as a combination drip edge and gutter hanger. I always use an additional drip edge over this apron and install the gutter and hangers before installing the roof. Hiding and sealing the hangers as I go along[/quote]

Thanks for the reply…

The end of the gutter in question is below the upper gutter that takes rain from the roof…and there is no way to add a downspout there unless a new drain line was dug-in and tied into my existing one at the other end…

I guess i will have to live with them just bumping the gutter out of the channel at this point and screw the backs into the fascia.

I called Alco and spoke with their tech (VERY helpful guy) and he said pushing up behind wasnt his concern but dropping the other end (the drain end) down and out of the channel was…I think tehy can probably put that end back in and then raise the low end and all should be well…I hope…


#6

For better answers, if you did actually use the Alcoa system you provided a link to, maybe you should describe the Gutter Apron as a Gutter Receiver or Cleat Style Hanger.

The link I looked at is not what is typically referred to as a Gutter Apron.

Ed


#7

…er…well, I dont believe I ever called it “gutter apron”…I called it “roof apron”…and thats what Alcoa calls their product and that is the only terminology I have been exposed to …


#8

You are correct. Word play in the mind when you are so used to certain terminology, sometimes being misused.

Ed


#9

Gotcha.

I guess at this point I just ahvwe to go with my gut and hope that no long term issues pop up…


#10

Hi,

Sometimes the house makes for hard drainage. Putting in a false bottom may be the only solution. This is rare though.

You install the gutter so it will drain properly. Then you deal with the apron.

This problem is a major deal. Find another contractor that knows what he is doing.


#11

I had looked into the possibility of
re-bending the roof apron.
The problem is/ was…I really like the 20 ft
lengths ( I think 20 anyways.)

It wouldn’t take much of an adjustment to make the re-bend, but too much pitch makes for a really sloppy
gutter bar hanger detail.

The idea of an internal add-on might work…
maybe just cutting off 1/2 inch from the front and back of another gutter and setting it into gutter seal
with spacers to re-direct the pitch would be simpler to do.

that make sense?

David