Question about possible inadequate shingle overhang


#1

Hello,

I am a homeowner from Florida and I’m hoping that someone can give me some advice.

I had a new roof installed about 2.5 years ago, and I’ve just noticed that my wooden fascia has begun to rot in a few places due to water damage. After searching around a bit on the internet about fascia replacement, I found that many people recommend a shingle overhang of at least 1/2" over a drip edge. My roofer installed the shingles flush with the drip edge. Being a first-time homeowner, I was unaware of this requirement at the time and I didn’t notice anything wrong. Now, I suspect that the reason for the water rot is due to the runoff clinging to the drip edge, and through capillary-action dripping directly onto the fascia.

Most of the damaged areas appear to be centered around the fascia joints. Now I know that I should have made certain that these joints were properly caulked when I painted the fascia 2 years ago.

How important is having a 1/2" or so overhang? I’m assuming that they didn’t leave an overhang due to fears of hurricane-force winds down here, but I’ve read a few posts on this forum where people say that as long as the overhang is not excessive, it shouldn’t be a problem. When I go about repairing or replacing the damaged areas, should I somehow create a shingle overhang over the drip edge, especially on the lower ends of the roof? How would I go about this? Could I simply add a row of shingles under the starter row?

I don’t want to go through all of these repairs only to have the same problem again next year. Maybe tomorrow I’m going to remove some of my aluminum soffit pieces and poke my head in there to see if any of the damage extends behind the fascia.

Thank you,

Buckao


#2

No offense meant to anyone in this forum please.

Many regions don’t even use evedrip or they only use it sometimes or just at the eve.
That is acceptable in those regions.

Your evedrip is your overhang and fascial protection.

It is normal for the shingle to run even with the evedrip.

Some pics would be helpfull.


#3

In most parts of florida is would be against code to have the shingles overhanging. The wind concerns are the reason why.
That is why you see so much vinyl or aluminum fascia down here.


#4

We run our overhang roughly an inch but then again im in WI where it is currently raining and everyone has the day off. I have no idea about flordia but what RooferChris said seems pretty logical.


#5

I haven’t roofed in florida in 10 years and it was code then in Melborne. Just caulk the joints and keep good paint on the facia, and keep your fingers crossed. I personally don’t like exterior latex for facia, I have always used an enamal base paint and it seems to work better. I have seen water get behind latex paint and fill up with water and grow to the size of a watermelon.


#6

just a couple more points.
Years ago in Florida builders would mount a 1x2 on the outside of the fascia then go with the drip edge thus keeping water off the fascia. Most new builders have abandon the 1x2 and wrap the fascia instead. Also it can depend on the pitch of your roof.
Melbourne huh? From my neck of the woods. Brevard county here. Northern Cocoa.


#7

[quote=“RooferChris”]just a couple more points.
Years ago in Florida builders would mount a 1x2 on the outside of the fascia then go with the drip edge thus keeping water off the fascia. Most new builders have abandon the 1x2 and wrap the fascia instead. Also it can depend on the pitch of your roof.
Melbourne huh? From my neck of the woods. Brevard county here. Northern Cocoa.[/quote]

That ought to be a code as well ,1x2 shingle strips if they are running the shingles even with the drip edge. It seems water couldn’t get in if the trim coil is run under the drip edge but I see a lot of it coming loose and rotting the facia.


#8

by 1x2 i meant a firing strip, (a piece of wood that helps extend the drip edge off the fascia.) I hope I’m explaining myself correctly. Basically it moves the bottom of the drip edge about an inch off the fascia. The water then runs off the drip edge instead of down the fascia.


#9

We call them shingle strips here ,and like down there, homebuilders have stopped useing them .


#10

You can slide an aluminum Gutter Apron Drip Edge sheet metal flashing under the first course of shingles so the future water run-off will not directly migrate into the wood fascia board.

In Florida, the shingles at all perimeter edges are supposed to be sealed down with roofing cement as a precautionary measure against wind uplift.

Ed


#11

You are right Ed, makes for a messy job too.
Chris, we just did the Brevard DOC there last year in cocoa beach.