Price Check on Aisle Ouch!


#1

I just purchase a 1928 Monterrey Colonial in San Marino California. The home needs a lot of work. First on the list is a new roof. The current 45 squares of roof is a mix of wood shake and shingle on about a 3/12 pitch. The city will only allow me to put on a class A sake/shingle system or Monier Cederlite. The one quote that I have received is for the Cederlite and includes:

  1. tearoff
  2. new plywood
  3. materials
  4. labor

Total $43,700

That is almost $1,000 a square which seems high to me… but I could be wrong.

I need advise from people wiser than me. What would you do? Limited of the house are at 1464virginia.com/

Thanks,

Ron


#2

After a quick check:

“Monier has discontinued the Duralite line and has limited the marketing area for CedarLite. See Eagle Roofing’s EagleLite line for alternate lightweight roofing tiles.”

Doubt I’d put something on my roof that was being discontinued… Will be hard to get replacement items later. Also tell the city building dept I said they were stupid as none of the materials they allow are made for low slope roofing. 3/12 is low slope material territory IMO.

1,000 a sq doesn’t sound too high for the Monier, the tile itself is very expensive. If in doubt get other quotes.


#3

[quote=“Tar Monkey”]After a quick check:

“Monier has discontinued the Duralite line and has limited the marketing area for CedarLite. See Eagle Roofing’s EagleLite line for alternate lightweight roofing tiles.”

Doubt I’d put something on my roof that was being discontinued… Will be hard to get replacement items later. Also tell the city building dept I said they were stupid as none of the materials they allow are made for low slope roofing. 3/12 is low slope material territory IMO.

1,000 a sq doesn’t sound too high for the Monier, the tile itself is very expensive. If in doubt get other quotes.[/quote]

The city is very much in the dark ages. They won’t even allow Romex wiring. What are your thoughts on class “A” wood shake/shingle systems?

Thanks again - Ron


#4

I am not sure if you are a member of one but usually some HomeOwner Associations here in my area on the fancy homes have this crazy appllication standards which only allow you to have a certain type of roof and it must be applied by their specs .

For example staggering all the pieces is one major increase in labor and material consumption rather then a standard straight application .

I am almost 100% sure thats the reason for your quote .

I believe some HOA’s even have their own inspectors who even the roof is installed right they still can complaint and make you re-do it .

One HOA i went to quote on wanted me to go and install one square down then schedule an inspection with their inspector for him to come out and approve it .

This is besides the regular city inspections !!

A complete waste of time if you ask me .

Make you take twice as long for a regular application.


#5

[quote=“QRFL”]I am not sure if you are a member of one but usually some HomeOwner Associations here in my area on the fancy homes have this crazy appllication standards which only allow you to have a certain type of roof and it must be applied by their specs .
[/quote]

It is not a HOA but a small city that has very strict building and design codes.


#6

** What are your thoughts on class “A” wood shake/shingle systems? **

My thoughts are irrelevant in your case because a 3/12 requires flat roof materials IMO, not shingles…of any type. You building dept. is:

a. Run by idiots

b. Unaware of your roof pitch and is giving you the wrong requirements.

c. Both a and b


#7

you are redeckin thats alot of work, so its not that high.
i guess.

gweedo


#8

[quote=“Tar Monkey”]** What are your thoughts on class “A” wood shake/shingle systems? **

My thoughts are irrelevant in your case because a 3/12 requires flat roof materials IMO, not shingles…of any type. You building dept. is:

a. Run by idiots

b. Unaware of your roof pitch and is giving you the wrong requirements.

c. Both a and b[/quote]

You forgot:

d: Whatever they did in the 1920’s was “better” then anything done today so well will make you repeat the mistakes of the past.


#9

Will the building dept (vs. the zoning or the city commission) pay attention to ICBO or NRCA or any other nationally recognized body that makes suggestions as to what is correct for that pitch?

The only other alternative I can see is to possibly re-truss & modify the pitch.

Either that, or go with the required product, but have it installed over the top of some kind of peel & stick base layer.

What if he were to use a 3/4 lap TriFlex 30 or something similar?

Shooting in the dark here…

Oh, & it sounds to me like if you’re having issues on this subject, you’d be best to put this house back on the market & get a home somewhere the “Beautification Police” don’t do hourly patrols.


#10

[quote=“swmrdrn”]

The city is very much in the dark ages. They won’t even allow Romex wiring. What are your thoughts on class “A” wood shake/shingle systems?

Thanks again - Ron[/quote]

I know this is a roofing forum and the others have covered how the local officials have their heads in a dark and unsanitary place…but if they don’t allow Romex wiring, what do they allow? BX? Conduit with pulled wires? Extension cords?

One more thing…from the looks of the house, I’d say get it done right. Saving a few thousand and ending up with a disaster on the roof, leaking inside, etc. would be a mistake.

I’d want a very established, reputable company with a lot of experience and a lot of insurance to do the work. Probably will cost more, but look what you’re preserving. Now, the added expense of the local building inspectors making sure every nail is driven to spec and using satellite imagery and laser measurements to insure compliance will complicate things, but it’s a little too late now. You bought it, you’re committed.

Ask around, I’m sure you’ll find someone who’s dealt with this pack of yahoos in the past and knows the buttons to push to make it run smoother.

Good luck!


#11

I have a few quotes from good roofers and will get it done right because as you point out the house is worth it.

The city will allow BX in applications under 6’ long otherwise I need to pull wire through conduit.


#12

OK, I figured it was some ridiculous thing like knob and tube wiring to “keep in the era”.

My mother and stepfather live in a town dominated by the “Hysterical Society”. He lives in the original bakery building for the town (old mining town) that was literally built with wood from dynamite boxes. It had an ornamental roof dormer that was leaking when it rained. The Hysterical Society would not let him remove or fix the dormer so it wouldn’t leak.

So, one day, a “branch from a tree” swooped across the roof and removed the offending dormer. Well now we had to fix the roof, of course, since it was wide open. They had a fit, but couldn’t stop us. They threatened legal action, but it was a hollow threat.

It was totally ridiculous what they would and wouldn’t allow and it was totally arbitrary.

Good Luck

Tony