Owen Corning solid strip of tar


#1

I try to do a search before posting. I couldn’t find the answer to my questions. I read that Owens Corning uses a solid strip of tar. I am worried about water getting behind the shingle and being trapped. I am going to use a architectural 50 year shingle. Is this something to worry about? Is Owen corning the only one that doesn’t use spotted strips? I am also considering GAF. Are they spotted? I don’t really like the colors as much though.


#2

GAF are spotted and in my opinion a far superior product.


#3

This was a previous post from a roofers response on the OWENS CORNING DURATION SHINGLE

please send all donations to gweedo/tampa bay.

the spotted sealant strip was developed to stop water from entering
at the sides and running inbetween, sideways, on lower slopes.
putting the sealant strips in spots helped alleviate this problem
the water that gets in the sides doesnt trail over, it is able to escape
out from inbetween. the lower the slope the more water enters at the sides, the more important the spotted strip .
i have allready repaired shingles with the solid strip.
everyone i lifted had water trapped inbetween and rusted away nails.

if you are installin shingles with a solid sealant strip, do yourself
a favor. stop.

gweedo

gweedo


#4

Bread, yes the water does get trapped iunder the shingles. about 12-13 years ago, I started seeing this problem, that was about the time OC went to the solid tar strip. I installed many OC roofs because of the solid tar strip and the hold down power of it. I started seeing probelms right away, usually in the valleys, on the house roof sides of the dormers. Finally after a lot of research, investigating and ripping the roofs apart, we came to the conclusion that yes, infact the water was getting into the butt ends of the shingles and not being able to get back out, so the water goes under the shingles at the butt ends below where the water came in. When we finally realized what was going on, I called the OC rep and asked what can we do about it. They denied the problem from the get-go. I even called the main office and asked them, they also denied the problem.

I was called out on a leak call years ago, the homeowner had already spent over $3000 to stop a roof leak, he wasn’t going to pay the roofer any more money. He called us to come out and look at the roof and his leak. I fixed the probelm for $45. I caulked the rain lines next to the valley. He would call me every single time it rained and thank me.

I have also seen this problem with the Oakridge in the field of the roof, never with the 3-in-1s though. The 3-in-1s have only had this probelm in the valley areas.


#5

How about architectural shingles? I can understand this being a problem with 3 tab shingles. Water could get behind any of the tabs. On architectural shingles, the water would have to get in the seam between shingles. There isn’t as many places for water to get behind the shingle. If you seal the vertical seems at valleys, I think these type of shingles should be alright.

Gweedo, were you referring to 3 tab shingles?


#6

nicely done mr Bob15201,
nicely done indeed.

i love the look on the faces of all the folks
when i tell them that i wont be warrantyin the
shingles they just bought, due to the solid strip.

they put em on anyway.
i love puttin roofs on and not
bein responcable for them.

really i doo.

gweedo


#7

[quote=“gweedo”]nicely done mr Bob15201,
nicely done indeed.

i love the look on the faces of all the folks
when i tell them that i wont be warrantyin the
shingles they just bought, due to the solid strip.

they put em on anyway.
i love puttin roofs on and not
bein responcable for them.

really i doo.

gweedo[/quote]

Gweedo,

Architectural or 3 tab? I don’t see it being much of a problem with the former. The only thing I would worry about would be the valleys. I might cement a ones in that area.