Ok here's my roof pictures


#1

I thought i’d post some pics of my roof.A few contractors have looked (4)
everyone says It is on it’s last leg.
Two have given bids on 2 ply mod bit roofs 14k & 16k.Two have given bids on a SPF foam roof 3 ply at 14k & 2 ply (coatings) 17k.
The mod bit offer 3 yr warranty and complete tear off of existing roof.
The SPF contractors offer 10 yr warranty , no tear off spray foam over existing roof.

So I am torn between the two systems.

look at the images and see if something is blatant about it.

Thanks

http://home.att.net/~fast996/DSCN0830.JPG
http://home.att.net/~fast996/DSCN0829.JPG
http://home.att.net/~fast996/DSCN0831.JPG
http://home.att.net/~fast996/DSCN0832.JPG


#2

If that were mine, I would make some minor repairs, prep and spray a 60 mil polyurea membrane over it. Strong as any other system, been in use for over 22 years of proven history.


#3

im not a mod bit pro though its the first roof I ever installed as opposed to laboring and it never leaked. I thought it was an easy installation compared to some, however, ill comment anyway from my limited knowlege… I see no signs that this roof is finished. I think this roof can be repaired. doesnt look like bad workmanship on the majority of it, except the skylight flashing which is flimsy and skeptical. The “tar” repairs if thats what it is raises an eyebrow to me. I was always told tar does not chemically react well to modified bitumen. Chasing leaks on a flat roof is an art form, how did they determine where the leak is coming from? I saw even draws on all seams, with a few over draws, but still nice and no blisters or curling at t laps. I’d get some more opinions at least.


#4

There are no flashings, for one.


#5

elaborate if you will aaron. now im asking. youve got parapet walls flashed in flimsy oilcanned aluminum mill finish. Skylights flashed in the same flimsy oilcanned aluminum, mill finish. But they don’t look like theyre leaking to me. I re-evaluated the pictures and saw clearly that the pipe didn’t look too good. looked like signs of leakage coming in from the cover strip in front of the boot from the discoloration. I say the cover strip in front of the pipe boot is the leak. What do you see as a more experienced professional on the subject than I? Additionally, after re-evaluating the pictures, the first pictures seam didnt appear to have any draw… but what else.


#6

Is the patient dying? Or are they telling stories on me .Really have to hear some honest opinions as I am on a fixed income,bought the condo last year in which it leaked in the right rear section just to the right of the fireplace.
To be honest it doesn’t look that bad to me.
One contracter said “all the seams are separating” “you have fishmounts &
alligatoring badly” “along with a very high maintanance factor”.
Unfortuneatly I am unabble to climb or get up there due to a disability or I’d go up there.A friend of mine went up at snapped these images today
so I need help.
Arron,Cerb and all should I just flash it and have seal it and then get a good cool coating and be done.

Thanks you guys for all your kind help on this.

Gary


#7

Based on the photos, it doesn’t look like the roof is too bad. Who ever installed it did you no favors though, because they forgot to flash the soil stacks, skylight bubbles, etc.

If you are on a fixed income and want to pospone the inevitable, here is what I would do.

  1. Have the roof cored in a couple of place to see whether the roof insulation is wet.

  2. If the insulation is in relatively good condition, and you don’t have a lot of entrapped moisture, I would have a roofing contractor install lead flashings on all of your soil stacks, skylight bubbles (but I’d actually get rid of those pieces of crap).

  3. Repair your fishmouths, open seams, blisters, and major ridging.

  4. Install base flashing around large skylight curbs, chimney, etc., but I’d probably let the tie-in to the cedar shake slide for now.

  5. Strip-in all the repairs made with roofing cement with new modified bitumen membrane.

  6. Coat the roof with an elastometric membrane.

Now, the more I look at the photos, the more it looks like you may have some poor adhesion between the roof membrane and substrate. I can’t judge from the photos, but if it is bad you may be better off replacing the roof.

One thing for sure, whoever installed the original roof should not be allowed back onto your roof to install the next one. Anyone that would install a mod. bit. roof without flashings is either a moron, or is looking for repeat business in the near future.

The easy answer is to replace your roof, but if you go the repair route you may be able to buy a few years before you have to replace the existing.

More photos would help, especially in the area where it looks like there is a lot of ridging and disbonded membrane. Have someone core the roof, and that can ultimately help you make an informed decision.


#8

Cerbeus,

Image 1,2,3 is my roof with the solatubes and the 1 skylight with the directv secured with block.The last image is looking from my neighbors
condo towards my roof area.She has the large skylights closest in that image.Half of the roof is hers the roof farthest is mine.

Hope that clarifies things a bit.

I will talk to a roofer tommorow about the points you mentioned and see
how it goes.

Thanks,
Gary


#9

Yep, I think that if this roof os only leaking in one place, and the base is firmly in place, then you should be able to do like Cerberus says. You should expect to pay for the inspection and survey report, though.

Then, when it is time to roof it, look into polyurea for time-tested long term waterproofing sloutions. :smiley:


#10

I want to apologize for possible bad advice. Your roof might still be repairable, but I think I was looking at your neighbors roof, which looked ok to me :mrgreen:


#11

Well I made a decision on everybodys excellant advice. I am having a 1.5 inch 3.0 foam roof installed. Here are the specs. I also wanted to say that in my area it is pretty dry so I went the cost saving route with a acrylic coating. Again Thank You.

  1. Preparation:

       A.  Establish parking restrictions and provide necessary barricades and notices.
    
       B.  Prime all areas to accept foam with neoprime primer.
    
       C.  Install sheet metal pan under A/C unit.
    
       D.  Replace 3 vents for proper height.
    
       E.  Install edge metal over copping.
    
       F.  Cut one row of shingles and install flashing metal.
    
    1. Polyurethane foam application: Foam to be sprayed at temperatures above 70

                                                            degrees and wind not exceeding 12 miles per hour
      

      A. Mask all areas not to accept foam to protect from overspray.

      B. Apply 1.5 “3.0 pcf polyurethane foam. All foam will terminate in clean

          straight lines.
      

      C. Apply 1.0â€


#12

Make sure you have the foam applicator core the roof in several places to ensure there is no moisture entrapped within the existing roof. If they find wet areas, I recommend they remove them and build up the area with insulation prior to applying the SPF.


#13

Sure dont like item F. They should be able to remove and replace those shingles as necessary.

Why not a white top coat? This will provide the best UV reflectance. you will want 70% or more reflectance aged 3 years.


#14

Aaron we are talking about the shingles on the bottom row in pics 2 & 3, I will ask him to replace those after the flashing.

The building is tan on the exterior so he thought it would match niceley. I will change it to white, that was a option.

I also will investigate the DOE tax credit, the tax would bring the total down to $4 bucks a foot.

Thanks again, you do a great service here along with the other regulars.

Gary


#15

FWIW, just thought I’d point out that you don’t have any shingles in photos 2 & 3. Those appear to be cedar shakes, not cedar shingles. The difference being that cedar shakes are split and cedar shingles are saw cut. Not that it matters to you, just thought I’d provide the information for educational purposes.

I agree with Aaron, white is your better option for coating color.


#16

I thought I would post a pic of the SPF roof in progress. Here is the roof with the foam applied and also the first base coat of 208. The 2nd coat of base was done this morning and the final coat of Permax 115 with SRI #8 sand will be done on Thursday.

I can already tell a difference in the climate in my house, it is warmer and it is also quieter. Amazing as it seems to make the house just feel different.

http://home.att.net/~fast996/spf1rd.JPG


#17

Those base coats were Permax 108 instead of 208.


#18

How do you take out the bottom row of shakes without getting a leak putting them back… I’ve pulled them out on siding, but thats a straight wall. Its not like slate and asphalt shingles, try to get the nails out with these and you just end up with a bunch of snapped shakes is my experience with trying…


#19

yeah good for you gettin the foam on and feelin the sound profing and structural strengthenin properties.
the best thing about it is the roof there goin over.
dont have many problems goin over a torchdown roof.

gweedo.


#20

I must say I am truly impressed. In the last 24 hours the tempeture variation in the house has been 2 degrees total. No heating or AC just changed by outside climate and the low last night was 42 and the high 72. The temp varied from 66 to 68.