Nit picking or serious?


#1

Fighting with a contractor that did not follow instructions on OC installation to meet with contracted OC warranty. This was due to the contractor not removing old felt and installing over clear and clean roof deck. Contractor says they can get the warranty contracted through exception. Then today when new gutters went up we were inspecting and found a screw trapped between the facia and gutter and had to get ladder to pull it down. it was too tight and while up on ladder figured I would check for proper nailings. first lift of shingle I discovered nails not in the OC keval nail tape. This section has been replaced twice… I don’t what to have to rip off the roof but this is a problem.


#2

In my experience, you have somewhere around a 1 in 400 chance of having a manufacturers warranty issue. I’ve seen a manufacture come out for one warranty issue ever and he didn’t get on the roof. In other words, chances are tremendously in your favor the felt left on won’t come back to haunt you as far as your warranty goes.

With that said, it sounds like your roofer was very sloppy. I would try to find a competent inspector in your area come out and inspect your roof thoroughly even if you have to pay them. Only way you’re going to know the difference between sloppy and fatal.


#3

If decking is secured properly and there is no rotten wood, than it is actually better to install new underlayment over the old underlayment.


#4

Leaving the old felt does not effect the new roof, except for the warranty issues. It is good practice to remove the felt to inspect the deck. Without removing the felt there is no way to tell if there are defects, rot, ect.

The improper nailing is a much bigger concert. Are the nails above or below the nail strip?. High nailing can lead too a lot of problems down the road. Do you have any picture?

I would recommend doing some more investigation. If you can safely do so, check the nailing in a few different areas to see if it is a wide spread problem and go from there. Owens Corning in particular makes it pretty straight forward as to where the nails being.


#6

You can easily tell if there is rot. You walk all over every single sq ft of roof in the tear off process. If there is rot you will feel it. But yes I agree that the nailing could possibly be a concern.


#7

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#8

Yeah, that’s some pretty bad nailing. Is the whole roof like that?


#9

That nail is way too high and also very close to the seam, both indicators of sloppy work. Would defiantly look at the rest of the work or have an inspection done.


#10

Thanks everyone. We are having a third party inspector come out today. This is just one of many issues I as a laymen have seen.


#11

Hi Yes I have pics


#12

You have every right to question this roof!
I see a huge gap between the step flashing.
I see shingles that were not cut again after they realized they cut them too big and now they are buckling against the wall.

It is fixable but is a sign how they treated the rest of the roof.

The pic with high nail and next to the seam??
I hope thats the only one…


#13

The pic of the shingles against the wall finally loaded for me. That is horrible work… Just scary if that is they finished product.


#14

The roof inspector I hired said there needed to be a 2" gap between the wall and the shingles. But I cannot find a standard for this only for the siding coming down vertically. So to get rid of the bunching where they are shoved up against the wall, obviously I am making them tear it off and redo, but how much space should be there?


#15

2" is excessive, 1/2" is fine.