New to industry


#1

Hi. I’m a 4 month veteran of the residential exterior remodeling industry (Minneapolis, MN). I’ve got great resources as is, but I’d prefer to keep them selling while I learn details. I’ve browsed the forum and noticed that there are some very knowledgable people contributing. I’d like to start by thanking each and every one of them for their time and expertise. I will be reading daily and contributing as much as I can, but I do have a few minor details that I’d like to get some perspectives on. I hate to take up any more of your time than I have to, but here they are:

  1. 3-tab vs. dimensional on less than a 4/12.

Does the laminated part of the shingle make for slower/improper drainage? Why else would that be recommended?

  1. Chimney flashing - why would riglet/reglet (not sure of the correct spelling) be required to flash a chimney vs. standard bent (110 degree?) sheetmetal?

  2. Bidding - after “measuring” for surface squares, is adding 2-3 bundles of starter (20 yr 3-tab) and 5 bundles of ridge (Timbertex, for example) for a bid price standard? Or is the majority of the world bidding surface squares (due to customer anality)? (quantities are arbitrary) (i use “measuring” in quotes because of shortcuts (counting 3-tabs, fascia, etc))

Insurance will generally pay for surface area on removal, then add hip/ridge and starter for the installation. I believe that they should start with surface area, add waste, then hip/ridge and starter.

  1. How low of a pitch will you go before you use rubber?

  2. Who needs a tape measure to bid a roof with 3-tab?

  3. Who also subs out siding?

Thanks for any response, I truly appreciate it.


#2

This has peeked my interest. First of all, you always should measure the roof reguardless of what material is down. If you dont you will be short more than half the time. A guy i worked with a few years ago worked like that and well he was back at the sites several times a week bringing materials that he shorted himself of. Rememeber there are squares and triangles on a roof nothing more. I use a wheel alot faster and never been short yet and doing for over 10 years.Your not in this business to guess you are here to be right and correct on take offs.

You never and i mean never just add a few bundles for starter. If you can not figure out how much starter is needed when you measure then you should not be doing this work. And the same goes for ridge. When you are short first you lose money second, you look foolish.

3 tabs seem to be the way to go with a 3/12 lower than that i would go with a peel and stick to match color. Dont feel comfortable with that low of pitch with shingles. 2 layers of felt must be used with a pitch 4/12 and lower.

Are you an estimator that is learning or are you trying to be an estimator? reason why i ask is selling is either you are good or you starve. its the harest high paying job or the lowest easy job in the roofing gig. If you are in need of help email me and i can give you some pointers.


#3
  1. A reglet is not " required ", but it’s a better install detail.

I don’t use a true reglet detail. That requires a separate flashing piece " receiver " in the mortar joint that the counter flashing is inserted and locked together.
I will chisel out the mortar, bend the counter flashing into the joint with a small lip at the backside, and re mortar the joint.
%between%http://roofersreview.com/d/520-5/K_chimney_done.jpg

This chimney flashing is over 80 yrs old, a little different style.
%between%http://roofersreview.com/d/5937-4/old+copper+chimney+step+flashing.jpg

And this is something new, counter flashing bent and caulked. ( I will be replacing this in a couple weeks.)
%between%http://roofersreview.com/d/6104-2/Flat+tile+and+chimney+flashing01.jpg
%between%http://roofersreview.com/d/6107-2/Flat+tile+and+chimney+flashing04.jpg

:smiley:


#4

thats some purty copper,dennis


#5

Replacing that craftsmanship would be shame, Dennis. Thats why the good roofers slapped all that mammy on it…they didn’t want to ruin the masterpiece… :shock:


#6

[quote=“TheBestRookie”]Hi. I’m a 4 month veteran of the residential exterior remodeling industry (Minneapolis, MN). I’ve got great resources as is, but I’d prefer to keep them selling while I learn details. I’ve browsed the forum and noticed that there are some very knowledgable people contributing. I’d like to start by thanking each and every one of them for their time and expertise. I will be reading daily and contributing as much as I can, but I do have a few minor details that I’d like to get some perspectives on. I hate to take up any more of your time than I have to, but here they are:

  1. 3-tab vs. dimensional on less than a 4/12.

Does the laminated part of the shingle make for slower/improper drainage? Why else would that be recommended?

  1. Chimney flashing - why would riglet/reglet (not sure of the correct spelling) be required to flash a chimney vs. standard bent (110 degree?) sheetmetal?

  2. Bidding - after “measuring” for surface squares, is adding 2-3 bundles of starter (20 yr 3-tab) and 5 bundles of ridge (Timbertex, for example) for a bid price standard? Or is the majority of the world bidding surface squares (due to customer anality)? (quantities are arbitrary) (i use “measuring” in quotes because of shortcuts (counting 3-tabs, fascia, etc))

Insurance will generally pay for surface area on removal, then add hip/ridge and starter for the installation. I believe that they should start with surface area, add waste, then hip/ridge and starter.

  1. How low of a pitch will you go before you use rubber?

  2. Who needs a tape measure to bid a roof with 3-tab?

  3. Who also subs out siding?

Thanks for any response, I truly appreciate it.[/quote]

  1. Laminates are fine on low pitch roofs. Never heard any warnings about laminated shingles on low pictched roofs causing problems. Actually with no eye lines the chance of leaking would go down.

  2. Riglet works good but re-using old counter flashing also works well if in good condition, painted of course when finished to match the air vents.

  3. Insurance companies should be paying to tear off ridge and starter shingles. I’ve told homeowners and builders when they supply the materials that the ridge and starter shingles don’t put themselves down. IMO Minnesota average insurance pay of $50 per square to tear off is too cheap. Average labor for installing new construction $50 a square in MN for 6-8/12’s and installing Winterguard if the builder pays yeilds $20-30 a 2 sq roll. Insurance companies pay high on the shingles and labor to install, Winterguard, and felt. Roofing for 10 years now Installing is much easier the tearing off.

  4. Ever see or hear of metric three tab shingles? Most of the roofs with these shingles are long gone but I’ve seen two so far this Summer.


#7

BTW, Good Luck!!!


#8

welcome thebestrookie,

  1. flat roof product, from flat - 2/12/p
    3tab or other one peace shingle 2/12/p - 4/12/p
    two peace demensionals or any other shingle 4/12/p and up.
    3 tab shingles do not trap water like demensionals.
    also if there is a solid sealant strip ( not spotted) on any shingle, you will be sorry if you lay them. the spotted sealant strip on shingles is done that way for a reason, it is to let water, that enters at the sides, to exscape out the bottom and not run sideways to the next shingle butt, or roofing nail.
    im starting to notice more and more manufactures going to the solid stickem strip.
    not good.

  2. like the single copper flashing. dont need 8 peaces of metal to go around a chimney.

  3. add a foot to each measurement ( up and over), get your sqaures, xs by whatever, and get the hell outta there.
    dont spend a bunch of time gettin every little detail, till ya got some money in your hand.

  4. 2/ 12/p is my cutt off from flat roof product to sloped roof product.

  5. i dont need a tape to bid any roof.

  6. no siding.

good luck.

gweedo.


#9

For craps’ sake, gweedo is still saying to goop stuff up…

You dont need eight pieces…a nice jackleg classic statement…but you DO need skills.


#10

I dont know im a firm believer in measuing the roof correctly. But hey thats all i do everyday so what do i know. Maybe i was taught to do things right the first time.