New roof questions


#1

Just had a new roof (total tear off) with dimensional singles on a walkable bungalow from a licensed roofer. Here are a few questions:

When is the clear plastic stripping removed from the singles? I’m noticing it on the overhang, but there were a few instances it was removed near the gutters not allowing me to put gutter guards underneath due to it sticking.

Where the singles meet the siding like on a dormer and/or porch, shouldn’t the roofer be filling that area in with caulk or roof cement to prevent
leaking? I noticed some areas were sealed, but other areas are not. I kind of get the feeling they left it for me to do or a siding guy to do (which I don’t plan on hiring any time soon)

On a valley that slightly turns, the cut line is flipped at the turn as it goes up the valley. Is that normal? All the roofs I’ve noticed in the area have a continuous line going up the valley. Also there is a slight bump near the valley.

Finally, how much of an overhang should there be on the sides of the
house? It looks about 2 inches over and the line is’nt cut straight. Kind
of jagged.

Overall, the roof looks good. No shingles coming up. But I feel the above mentioned was done kind of sloppy. Out of a 100% rating, I would give it a 85%.

Thanks for any input.


#2

Hi,

The plastic stripping is never removed. The shingles are used the way they are right out of the package.

All your other questions. We would need pictures before commenting. We could guess.


#3

I’ll try to answer some of your questions but excuse me as I’ll just go after each question.

[quote=“don222”]Just had a new roof (total tear off) with dimensional singles on a walkable bungalow from a licensed roofer. Here are a few questions:

When is the clear plastic stripping removed from the singles? I’m noticing it on the overhang, but there were a few instances it was removed near the gutters not allowing me to put gutter guards underneath due to it sticking.

The plastic on the shingles is meant to prevent the shingles from sealing together during storage. If the roofers made there own starter shingles (you can buy pre made metric 7in tall starters) there could have been some of the plastic left on the shingles when they cut them. For this reason a while ago I stopped making the starter shingles and started buying them. The wind will blow off most if there exposed but there actually suposed to stay on the shingle as it determins the manufacturer, design of shingle, assembly plant, date, etc. This is why you send in two shingles to a roofing manufacturer.

Where the singles meet the siding like on a dormer and/or porch, shouldn’t the roofer be filling that area in with caulk or roof cement to prevent
leaking?

If they used flashing you shouldn’t need caulk as it will only last 5-10 years anyways. If roofed correctly it won’t leak.
I noticed some areas were sealed, but other areas are not. I kind of get the feeling they left it for me to do or a siding guy to do (which I don’t plan on hiring any time soon)

If your roof was recently replaced you may not have had enough sun to seal down all your shingles.

On a valley that slightly turns, the cut line is flipped at the turn as it goes up the valley. Is that normal? All the roofs I’ve noticed in the area have a continuous line going up the valley. Also there is a slight bump near the valley.

If your valley is not straight and has a turn in it the valley cut line will not be straight, and you probabably have a pitch change as well which could indicate why the roofer may have changed the cut side that is of course if they installed roll vally metal and did the california style valley or closed valley. If you have a pitch change of 2 or more you have to shingle in the lower pitched roof first but if you have an equal pitch on the both sides and a lot more water runs on one side you have to roof the smaller section of roof in first. The bulge may be caused by a build up of shingles, ice and water shield, and vally flashing in the transition area, this is normal.

Finally, how much of an overhang should there be on the sides of the
house? It looks about 2 inches over and the line is’nt cut straight. Kind
of jagged.

Certainteed calls for 3/4in with no drip edge and 1/2in with drip edge. 2in on the rakes is a lot and it will bend over with time and if it’s not cut straight it will be an eye sore until it either gets cut straight or once the roof is done again.

Overall, the roof looks good. No shingles coming up. But I feel the above mentioned was done kind of sloppy. Out of a 100% rating, I would give it a 85%.

Call the contractor and ask if the edges can be cut back to 3/4in and if they could use chaulk lines this time!!!

Thanks for any input.[/quote]


#4

Thanks for the info. Much appreciated. I’ll post some pictures tomorrow for a clearer view.


#5

Here’s the photos:

photolava.com/code/1e54,1e55 … ,1e58.html

Let me know your opinions on this new roof.

What type of valley style is this?

Thanks


#6

yea here it appears they didnt use a starter shingle thats why you see the plastic .

To fix this detail is a pain now that the shingles are nailed at the rakes .

Also in thsi picture i cannot tell if there is a tin shingle run on the wall but the way the roof to wall ends (red circle) leaves me with an uncomfortable feeling .

http://img53.imageshack.us/img53/9736/11wu5.jpg

On this bottom one i can definetly see no rake starter and the roof to wall detail is pretty ugly .

And can someone tell me please what is this “roof to wall??” i never seen such thing


#7

Are these details I can complete on my own with some kind of sealant or is it the responsibility of the roofer? I’m certainly not going to correct the overhang. That’s beyond my experience to get a straight line. Also, I’m unsure of the valley (pic not included above, click on link). Starting to look like they’ll have to return for some detail work. We’re expecting rain this Monday. Does this job look waterproof?


#8

cant really tell from here .

Cant really comment , cant see all the installation

Some warranties get void if you touch the roof or someone else besides the installer.

You shouldnt try to fix it yourself if you just purchase it


#9

Listen Don, this roofing is not acceptable by any standard. It looks like they got their details from a Dr. Seuss book to me. And literally, somebody must have read some of this in a book and thought it looked easy enough. That roof to wall flashing is similar to what you might see in a book, but if you saw it in real life the bends are not so exaggerated like that. An experienced roofer wouldn’t do this even as a shortcut, because it doesn’t take less time. They simply had no clue what they were doing. Thats my take on it.


#10

Hello,

The roof to wall flashing looks similar to what we use to cover wall vent. It does not look like you have wall vent. This could be some leftover material from another job. (Just my thoughts)

Keith


#11

roof to wall probably is referring to the apron metal


#12

It’s the weekend, but I placed a call to the roofing company asking to meet with the owner regarding my concerns. Sent him the photos.

This roof was done by his crew using Tamko shingles.

Any suggestions on how to approach him.

Thanks again everyone :expressionless:


#13

[quote=“don222”]It’s the weekend, but I placed a call to the roofing company asking to meet with the owner regarding my concerns. Sent him the photos.

This roof was done by his crew using Tamko shingles.

Any suggestions on how to approach him.

Thanks again everyone :|[/quote]

Tell him to come here and see our points


#14

That is what I’m referring to. The one with the apron metal looks silly to me, and the other one doesn’t even have any flashing there (tar! dee, dee, dee!)


#15

That is not apron metal, that is a roof to wall flashing with a strengthening hem bent into it. Besides the fact that it is not terminated properly on the end, I see nothing wrong with the bend itself.

The other pics look not so good.


#16

hopefully it wont leak.

gweedo