New roof. New version of drip edge problem. Please help


#1

Hello again all. Three years ago I had 20 year three tab shingles installed. I had major problems with improper installation of which I asked for advice from this forum. One of the main issues was that when it rained, the water ran behind the drip edge onto the fascia.

I had a new roof installed in July 2007 with 30 yr Certainteed architechural shingles. The roofer cut back some of the fascia board, but did not cap it. My new problem is that when it rains, the run-off laps the drip edge and facia board. Another way to say this is that: The water runs down front of the drip edge and gets on to the wood.

The roofing company, is licensed, insured, reputable and has been in business for a long time. At first they tried to tell me that this is normal. Then they said that it was the wind blowing the rain back on to the wood. Then when he finally sent a crew out here who got on top of the roof with a water hose, and saw precisely what I had been complaining about, on a clear day with no wind. The foreman said that some roofs will do this. They left and I did not hear anything for over a month.

When I first contacted the owner for a roof replacement, I told him about my concerns about the old drip-edge. I asked him about a water membrane, a customized drip-edge that was wider at the top. He said that all of that was not necessary. When I reminded him of this, he now says that he was trying to keep his price competitive. :x

Today, the owner came by. He is now trying to blame the problem on the construction of the house. He has offered to place aluminum trim on top of the fascia to keep the wood from rotting. This is for a charge of over $500 plus the balance of the remainder of the roof replacement.

I have never heard of this procedure and I really do not like the way it sounds. If I cover the fascia, won’t this accelerate the decay of the wood over time? His solution sounds like a cover-up.

I find it ironic that he left 1/2 of the cost of the roof unpaid without a phone call about the remaining balance. He did not call me, I had to call him. I believe that he knows that his crew did something wrong and had decided that it was more cost effective to forfeit his balance than to correct his mistake. I just want the roof done properly.

Also, I am having very large puddles of water on the concrete in the morning. Water is literally running off of the house. Of course he said that this too was normal.

Can anyone help me with this? Please. I can post photos if needed. I am sorry that this post is long. Thank you for all of your help.


#2

I dont know if im understanding you properly but when the water runs off the roof where is it supposed to go? Where im from 90% of wood is wrapped in aluminum with gutters. I have never personally heard of different drip edge changing thw way the roof rids itself of water. Whats the problem with the wood being wet? The wood will not rott if its wrapped. Your going to have to show me some pictures so i know what is going on so i can give you a solid answer.


#3

I am not sure of what it is that you are asking.

From what I gather there is drip edge installed, correct?
Is this a “T” style drip edge or “L” style or something different?
Are the shingles overhanging the drip edge at all?
If the shingles are not extended past the drip edge by 3\8" - 5\8" the run off can flow down the front of the facia, like I think you are describing.

If this is the case it may be as easy as taking off the bottom shingles and extending them to overhang the drip edge.
Doing this will result in 1 or 2 short courses at the bottom of the roof.

Posting pics would be very helpful.


#4

Funny how we opened with the same thought GTP, I didn’t really understand either.


#5

definatly need pics. im not sure i understand your complaint about puddles on your concrete? it is ok to wrap your fascia with aluminum. it will probably prolong the life of your fascia.


#6

I just looked at the pics you posted from 6 months ago or so.

It looks like you have some decking issues as well as a facia that sits above the roof plane (that is how it appears).

I understand you have had a new roof installed since these picture were taken?
Was the decking fixed?
I am guessing that the facia was not trimmed as suggested in your thread from months ago.

Current pics would help.


#7

I checked out your photobucket pictures of the old 3-tab roof that was in place and the wrong style of drip edge metal was used.

Some guys use the t-drip, also call ODE, which has a 90* bend in it, and when the top portion slides under the shingles, the front part gets jacked up in the air highr than the roof plane.

If the new roofer used a Gutter Apron Drip Edge metal, that would come with a pitch already bent into the metal.

As far as water dripping downwards, that is called gravity.

You can have the wooden fascia board clad in an aluminum capping and make sure that the aluminum extends under the bottom portion of the drip edge metal. Water will now drip down on the exterior of the aluminum fascia cladding and not permeate the wooden fasci boards.

Your concers are a little over thought out though. That is why exposed wood gets painted, to prevent moisure inhibition into the organic wood compounds.

Unless he had included the aluminum fascia in his original contract or you had requested that he do it, then he most definitely should be charging an additional charge for the additionally required work to put your mind at ease regardin the fascia boards getting wet.

The MRCA, (Midwest Roofing Contractors Association), just recently changed their advice regarding labor warranty length. Previously,they reasoned that if there were to be a workmanship issue, it would surface within One Years time after completion. Now, they recommend the warranty length to be for Two years from completion.

The environment and the quality of the product installed would have much more to do with problems any farther down the road than that.

Ed


#8

Howdy. Coonass here; cuz lives in Denham Springs & works @ LSU.

OK, down to bidness.

  1. Photos… yup, gotta see some photos.
  2. These are 2 of the more common types of drip edge. For low sloped roofing where I’m concerned about water blowback, I get a T channel made with a 6" cap portion; that’s the deck covering (T Channel is what we actually call “DL” in these parts, which is Central Texas).
    http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s153/RanchHandRoofing/Technical%20Details/DripEdgeProfiles.jpg

If anyone wants to post the PhotoBucket link, I’ll look @ it & agree / argue / ignore you. :smiley:


#9

From my observations the water is supposed to fan out, run over the edge of the bottom shingles then fall paralell to the ground. If you stand and look at the overhang of the soffits, when it rains you should see a line of water sheeting off uniformly.
Roof edge != rain water
!!!
!!!
!!!
-------------------------------- Ground
This is what I have:
Roof edge
!!! !!! !!! !!! !!! Corner
!!! !!! !!! !!! !
!! !! !! !! !
! ! ! ! !
! ! ! ! !
-------------------------------------------Ground

In my case the water the water streams off the shingles then back over the top of the lip of the drip edge and on to the fascia. The run off does not have the sheeting effect of the water being spread out. Intead it has a gushing effect, I can stand in certain spots and fill up a cup like I have turned on a faucet. I know it is hard to articulate. I wish that I could upload a video.

Axiom. <<From what I gather there is drip edge installed, correct?
Is this a “T” style drip edge or “L” style or something different?
Are the shingles overhanging the drip edge at all?>>

Yes there are shingles that overhang the drip edge by about 1/2 inch. I will measure to be sure. How can I tell if I have an “L” or “T” drip edge?

[quote="-Axiom-"]
It looks like you have some decking issues as well as a facia that sits above the roof plane (that is how it appears).
Was the decking fixed?
I am guessing that the facia was not trimmed as suggested in your thread from months ago.[/quote]

They trimmed back some of the facscia. They installed some new decking.

RanchhandRoofing>> I will get you guys some photos uploaded tommorrow.

Thanks Again.


#10

Er… I’m 100% positive that description will make sense once photos are posted.

For now… I’m confusalated.


#11

Just trying to diagram. There are spaces in between the exclamation points that tapers off in a stream.


#12

Ranch,

Can you draw a diagram of what a regular “Gutter Apron” Dripe Edge Flashing looks like.

The type that is bent to the pitch of a residential shingle roof, if you guys use that in TX.

Ed


#13

Ed, I am not 100% sure of what it is; I’m thinking it’s not really a drip edge but goes under siding where it meets an apron of roofing.

Can I think of it as an L shape but not 90 degrees; maybe like 110 degrees or so?


#14

Think of the dl style with the face flush against the facia when installed.

So it is like dl but a different angle between the lip and the face.

hardwareworld.com/33009gv10 … 0K9GC.aspx

I was thinking of something like this with a 1\2" lip on it.


#15

Thats it, except for the way they have it shown, does not show how the top part goes on the sloped roof.

Print it and then turn the paper so the part that goes down is vertical.

Ed


#16

Like this?

If this is correct, what sets it apart from the ‘normal’ drip edge detail posted /\bove ?

Other than not having a little kick @ the base of the fascia, I don’t see a lot different other than maybe the angle being wider so the face is fully vertical & the deck covering portion is more like what the true deck angle would be like in relation to the facia.


#17

Now add a lip to the deck cap portion that extends past the face cap 1\2", like a “T” or “DL” style.

The only difference between dl and gutter apron is the angle between the deck cap and face cap is bent to match the slope of the roof.
And the deck cap and face cap are both longer for the gutter apron.


#18

Sounds to me like that roof is not square to the ground in any way. But like we have said add pictures of what now is happeneing.


#19

Ranch,

If the T-Drip as you call it is not nailed in close to th front or solidly down, this can happen.

Ed

[quote=“ed the roofer”]I checked out your photobucket pictures of the old 3-tab roof that was in place and the wrong style of drip edge metal was used.

Some guys use the t-drip, also call ODE, which has a 90 bend in it, and when the top portion slides under the shingles, the front part gets jacked up in the air highr than the roof plane*.
If the new roofer used a Gutter Apron Drip Edge metal, that would come with a pitch already bent into the metal.

Ed[/quote]